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Old 06-19-2014, 08:21 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by memph View Post
Basically their present (not future) rankings are just based on % of retail/office in walkUPs. But walkUPs have to be big (>340k sf retail or 1.4million sf office) so I think a fair bit of small neighbourhood scale office/retail won't count. As for whether those nodes are walkable or not, part of it is walkscore (has to be >70), but for the retail nodes, pretty much anything with that much retail will have >70 walkscore.
Depending on condensed a walkUP is defined as, much of NYC doesn't even count for this ranking. Much of the outer boroughs is high density but not very centralized, so few nodes would reach the retail or office thershold. Despite a rather high fraction of shoppers and workers walking to the shop/workplace. An infill or greenfield mall in the outer boroughs would count, even if it's rather unwalkable for city standards.

However, look at the title, it's ranking "walking real estate projects" not how walkable the metro is overall.
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Old 06-19-2014, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Depending on condensed a walkUP is defined as, much of NYC doesn't even count for this ranking. Much of the outer boroughs is high density but not very centralized, so few nodes would reach the retail or office thershold. Despite a rather high fraction of shoppers and workers walking to the shop/workplace. An infill or greenfield mall in the outer boroughs would count, even if it's rather unwalkable for city standards.

However, look at the title, it's ranking "walking real estate projects" not how walkable the metro is overall.
That's how the article describes it, which might be more accurate, but the report itself describes it simply as "ranking walkable urbanism".

Regarding NYC, based on the report linked in post#20, most of Manhattan was included it seems, but for the outer boroughs, they just have:

-Fordham Road/Belmont
-Melrose/Concourse
-East Bronx
-Forest Hills
-Sunnyside
-Astoria
-Long Island City
-Downtown Brooklyn/Atlantic Ave
-Park Slope/Prospect Heights
-DUMBO
-Williamsburg

Which probably covers the most important nodes of walkability but still leaves out a fair bit.
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Old 06-20-2014, 11:45 AM
 
Location: The City
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Originally Posted by memph View Post
I agree, they should also consider how many people live in these walkUPs.

This lists all the walkUPs
http://business.gwu.edu/creua/includes/foottraffic.pdf

For the present ranking, where Philadelphia ranked 13th, it only includes five suburban town centres, and parts of the city proper, i.e.. not very much compared to other cities like Atlanta and D.C. The is evidenced by the fact that Philadelphia's walkUPs all have very high walkscores, mostly above 90, with the lowest at 83. D.C. and Atlanta included a lot with walkscores in the 70s and 80s. So based off this, Atlanta should rank lower, Philadelphia should rank higher, New York should rank ahead of D.C. and Houston and KC should rank lower too.

You can actually see a few places listed as walkUPs even though they failed the report's criteria of 70 walkscore at the most walkable intersection.

-South Waterfront in Portland
-National Harbour, Baileys Crossroads and most of Tysons Corners in suburban D.C.
also this excludes NJ and DE from Philly

odd list has trenton in NYC etc.
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