U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-25-2014, 10:10 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,563,164 times
Reputation: 4048

Advertisements

And sometimes, that lower COL area is the street!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-28-2014, 01:11 PM
 
10,920 posts, read 9,330,470 times
Reputation: 6613
No, in general there should be no subsidized housing. Specifically for seniors, there are a vast number of private, non-subsidized housing developments specifically for them. If they're priced out of where they live, or cannot function there, they should move to these. These also tend to be in lower cost regions, which will help them with their financial situation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2014, 01:33 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
I'm not a huge fan of subsidies, but many seniors cannot afford these "chi-chi" senior apt/condo complexes. If we're going to have subsidized housing for everyone else, why not seniors?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2014, 01:35 PM
 
10,920 posts, read 9,330,470 times
Reputation: 6613
The thing about seniors, and I'm being a little blunt about this, is that they die off. This leaves a lot of affordable estate resales in senior communities.

And we should not have subsidized housing for everyone else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm not a huge fan of subsidies, but many seniors cannot afford these "chi-chi" senior apt/condo complexes. If we're going to have subsidized housing for everyone else, why not seniors?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2014, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,737,509 times
Reputation: 32304
Default Wow! A raw nerve with me - SENIORS!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayorofnyc View Post
I'm against any kind of government (ie Taxpayer) funded housing. The way it's supposed to work is that seniors should have enough money from savings to retire comfortably while living in a home that's already paid for, if they so choose..otherwise, they should relocate to a lower COL area like many other seniors have done. Unfortunately having low rent is not a right.
I am 70 and I was so glad to read your post. I, too, am against any kind of government funded housing subsidies, including section 8. Why should I have to pay for my own housing (which I gladly do) and also pay for other people's housing?

As for seniors specifically, I have little sympathy for all the whining and crying about us. We are already getting significant government help, namely Medicare. In addition to Medicare, low-income seniors get all kinds of other help, such as Medicaid (which supplements Medicare), food stamps (yes, I know, it's called something else now), and free or reduced cost transportation (at least in many localities).

In the small city where I live in Los Angeles County there is a free van service called Senior Ride which is available seven days a week. That is absurd overkill. Why have such a service seven days a week? It could (and should) be five days a week max; seniors can get their groceries and have their doctor and dental appointments Monday through Friday.

In any case, in the small city where I live, everything is within walking distance of everything else anyway. Even at age 70 (and with a genetically sub-standard body in almost every respect), last weekend I walked four miles to an art house cinema in a neighboring city, watched the film, and walked home. I do have a car, but I enjoy walking and it was a good way for me to get my exercise for that day. It only takes an hour to walk four miles, or a little longer if one is not very tall or if there are lots of traffic lights to wait for. (I am 6' 1" so I have a longer stride than some).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 10:02 AM
 
29,779 posts, read 34,867,277 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
Most of the seniors will have family and support systems nearby. So you might theoretically save some money on rent but the seniors could need a lot more services they are now getting from family. Besides the cost issues, the seniors could have a much lower quality of life.
Bada Bing and that family support as they age is critical as is their long term social network. Perhaps the initial question is why do we house so many non working poor in high income areas like San Fran. They are the future poor elderly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 10:22 AM
 
29,779 posts, read 34,867,277 times
Reputation: 11705
There are people who live in low cost housing often subsidized for years. Many are employed in low paying jobs. In some affluent communities they are teachers and public safety employees who can't afford housing in or near where they work but those communities want them close by if not in their community. In some areas incomes of 60k with family will qualify you for offered affordable housing. In urban neighborhoods it is often a matter of safety to house vulnerable seniors in clustered dedicated housing designed with them in mind. Many towns want to give their off duty police officers cars to drive while officially off duty. Yet in their work district are they really off duty? Do wrong doers when seeing a police car really care?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 02:37 PM
 
29,779 posts, read 34,867,277 times
Reputation: 11705
Another bit of food for thought is that rent assisted senior housing often involves state and mist importantly local and charity funds. Hard to convince tax payers in low COLA areas that they should foot the bill for someone else's seniors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-03-2014, 07:31 AM
 
56,609 posts, read 80,910,543 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Another bit of food for thought is that rent assisted senior housing often involves state and mist importantly local and charity funds. Hard to convince tax payers in low COLA areas that they should foot the bill for someone else's seniors.
They are going to pay for it anyway in terms of infrastructure and services, one way or another. That may be why you may get some backlash from natives in regards to people moving into there formerly lower COL area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-03-2014, 01:16 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,789 posts, read 54,455,776 times
Reputation: 31093
[quote=Katiana;35309899]Well, true, but. . . Most seniors "retire in place", no matter what the fluff articles in the Sunday papers say. Whatever happened to the idea of "diverse" housing?[/quote]
It simply doesn't work. people on welfare or making minimum wages are just not comfortable living among the upper middle class, driving an old beater while their neighbor has a big Class A RV or ski boat in the driveway.

In our area a large development that started as an "urban village planned community" and is at about 10,000 people and still growing. Apartments there are running $1,400-1,600 for 1 bedroom. A local housing coalition has tried to make affordable housing available there for more diversity, with smaller condos that are selling for the low $300,000s. To qualify the income limits are about $79,000. The median home price is now at $800,000 but there is a YWCA Family Village. The Y is next to a 5 story commuter Park & Ride in the commercial area while the homes are all up in the hills. The requirement to live at the Y is to have an income less than 60% of the area's median income. Since that's $140,000, to qualify you only have to make less than $84,000. That's not exactly going to result in much diversity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top