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Old 06-30-2014, 11:10 AM
 
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It's definitely suburban, but it's very cohesive. It's an older suburb with a street-grid, sidewalks, narrow streets, older homes, and some walkability. Many of the schools appear to be older buildings that are well maintained.

I definitely "leans" urban compared to newer suburbs. I don't see any subdivisions or six-lane arterials.

It reminds me a lot of a suburb near where I live. It looks nice.
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Old 06-30-2014, 11:14 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,190,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
It's definitely suburban, but it's very cohesive. It's an older suburb with a street-grid, sidewalks, narrow streets, older homes, and some walkability. Many of the schools appear to be older buildings that are well maintained.

I definitely "leans" urban compared to newer suburbs. I don't see any subdivisions or six-lane arterials.

It reminds me a lot of a suburb near where I live. It looks nice.
That could describe much of Nassau County, though Garden City is older than most of the area. But less dense. Just outside Garden City is an intersection like this. Big arterial not very pedestrian friendly:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Garde...2.09,,0,-12.67

Right next to the biggest mall on Long Island. What do you mean by subdivision?
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Old 06-30-2014, 02:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That could describe much of Nassau County, though Garden City is older than most of the area. But less dense. Just outside Garden City is an intersection like this. Big arterial not very pedestrian friendly:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Garde...2.09,,0,-12.67

Right next to the biggest mall on Long Island. What do you mean by subdivision?
Yes, your link is not pedestrian friendly at all. That is what I associate with modern/current suburbs, in contrast to Garden City.

Here are couple examples of what I mean by a subdivison:
Belmont Grove Oak Creek — Stonecrest Shores Town of Yorkville — Isabelle Farms Germantown — Destiny Homes — Victory Homes of Wisconsin

Maybe it's a colloquialism... but I'm referring to neighborhoods that are built off of arterials or county highways and don't interconnect with a street network. I grew up in an exurb, and when describing where we lived, we would give the name of the the subdivison we lived in.

Last edited by Pete.; 06-30-2014 at 02:44 PM.. Reason: grammar
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Old 06-30-2014, 02:47 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,190,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
Here's a couple examples of what I mean by a subdivison:
Belmont Grove Oak Creek — Stonecrest Shores Town of Yorkville — Isabelle Farms Germantown — Destiny Homes — Victory Homes of Wisconsin

Maybe it's a colloquialism... but I'm referring to neighborhoods that are built off of arterials or county highways and don't interconnect with a street network. I grew up in an exurb, and when describing where we lived, we would give the name of the the subdivison we lived in.
I've heard someone from Michigan used that term. Is the subdivison the name of the developer? I wouldn't think that many people would know the development name unless it's really new. Who owns the green space surrounding those homes. There's very little on Long Island built like that, thoughI guess some of the newer developments in New England are kinda similar, though they wouldn't be off gridded or number road of course. I guess these developments near farmland are similar:

https://maps.google.com/?ll=42.36165...01766&t=h&z=16

https://maps.google.com/?ll=42.33843...35319&t=h&z=15

this is a fairly typical Long Island layout:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Massa...+New+York&z=14

the suburbs surrounding Miluwakee look a bit similar to the above, maybe this one:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=West+...Wisconsin&z=13

maybe not. Housing stock looks much older in West Allis.
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Old 06-30-2014, 03:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I've heard someone from Michigan used that term. Is the subdivison the name of the developer? I wouldn't think that many people would know the development name unless it's really new.
Makes sense - I'm from Wisconsin (as you could tell). Most subdivisions that I can think of have big signs by the entrances with the name of the development. It's usually something whimsical. In my previous post the names were "Stonecrest Shores" and "Isabelle Farms".

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Who owns the green space surrounding those homes. There's very little on Long Island built like that, thoughI guess some of the newer developments in New England are kinda similar, though they wouldn't be off gridded or number road of course. I guess these developments near farmland are similar:

https://maps.google.com/?ll=42.36165...01766&t=h&z=16

https://maps.google.com/?ll=42.33843...35319&t=h&z=15
Usually the green space surrounding the development is farm land. Those New England links look very similar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
this is a fairly typical Long Island layout:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Massa...+New+York&z=14

the suburbs surrounding Miluwakee look a bit similar to the above, maybe this one:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=West+...Wisconsin&z=13

maybe not. Housing stock looks much older in West Allis.
Much of West Allis is quite urban and the streets follow Milwaukee's grid. It definitely looks similar density-wise. The outer suburbs of Milwaukee are more of the "subdivision" variety.

Garden City reminded me a bit of Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin.

Dowtown: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.1185...flVw!2e0?hl=en

Residential: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Wh...ac510f62?hl=en
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Old 07-02-2014, 06:21 PM
 
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It looks like an older suburb, more tight together for when people had one car and mom needed to walk places. Long Island generally looks more urban-ish than other suburbs due to the size of the lots and age of the neighborhoods. I live in Farmingdale and some areas around the tracks and main street can be described as urban in nature even though most of the village is suburban to the bone.
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Old 07-04-2014, 09:57 AM
 
112 posts, read 108,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
Yes, your link is not pedestrian friendly at all. That is what I associate with modern/current suburbs, in contrast to Garden City.
haha I bike that all the time but I have family members who are terrified of crossing that intersection on foot lol
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Old 07-07-2014, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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It's definitely more suburban than urban, but it does have some urban parts, mainly around the mall.
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Old 07-07-2014, 01:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Very suburban. More suburban than your typical suburb, more "exurban" than "suburban" but without the exurban location.
Garden City, NY? Garden City is 100% walkable, with multiple rail stations offering 24/7 service to Manhattan. It has a downtown, with department stores, apartments, and pedestrian-oriented everything.

It doesn't have high density, because it has a bunch of parks and private open space, but it's, at the very least, inner suburbia.

If that's "exurban" then what would be your definition of "suburban"? Brooklyn?

I would say that Garden City is best described as "streetcar suburbia" or "inner suburbia".
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Old 07-07-2014, 01:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by bigjretrac View Post
While I enjoy walking along 7th and Franklin Avenues, behind those walkable buildings are huge parking lots. They put them behind the buildings to give the perception of a built up downtown. Walkable? Yes. Urban? Hardly.

OP, what parts of Garden City do you consider to be urban?
If presence of parking means an area isn't urban, then there is almost nothing urban in the U.S. outside of NYC.

I mean, every single new building in Chicago has a giant parking garage at the base. Does that mean that downtown Chicago isn't urban? Of course not.
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