U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-20-2014, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Shore of Cayuga Lake
796 posts, read 1,376,185 times
Reputation: 417

Advertisements

Hello everyone.

I had an argument with someone that this particular town in New York is more urban than suburban, to which the other person disagreed and said it is the typical suburb. However, in my mind, suburbs are usually far more rural than that.

I encourage all of you to throw Garden City, NY 11530 into Google Maps or Google Earth and take a look for yourselves.

What would you guys say? Is Garden City, NY more urban than suburban or is it the stereotypical suburb? It is 1.5 miles from the city limits of New York City and it has a population density of 4200 per square mile.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-20-2014, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,094 posts, read 16,138,912 times
Reputation: 12696
Very suburban. More suburban than your typical suburb, more "exurban" than "suburban" but without the exurban location.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Shore of Cayuga Lake
796 posts, read 1,376,185 times
Reputation: 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Very suburban. More suburban than your typical suburb, more "exurban" than "suburban" but without the exurban location.
You wouldn't say it's more developed and built-up than the average suburb? When I think of suburb, I think of something like Franklin Lakes, NJ
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 08:18 PM
 
2,776 posts, read 3,598,319 times
Reputation: 1380
It looks suburban to me (but older than many suburbs I'm used to). Nice big trees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 08:55 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,589,829 times
Reputation: 4048
"Suburban" is a subset of "urban." So it's both urban and suburban. Suburbs aren't rural.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,476 posts, read 11,979,561 times
Reputation: 10579
For me, the dividing line between suburban and urban is the widespread presence of driveways. I don't see any of the residential neighborhoods in Garden City lacking driveways. It seems like it was all built out with cars in mind, albeit mostly between 1920 and 1945, so it doesn't have the same built aesthetic as postwar suburbs.

I will say that the commercial corridors along 7th and Franklin look nice from the street side. Nice consistent street wall in places, and a good mix of retail and apartment buildings. Still, too many of the commercial buildings are only one story, which takes away from the urban feel. And there is a sea of parking behind literally every commercial building. This coupled with the low-density of the residential areas, means it's not particularly walkable, except for people who live in the apartments located in the business district.

On Google Maps you can see the village boundaries, and interestingly you can directly see the zoning changes between Garden City and adjoining areas. Honestly, I'd say the residential portion looks a lot less urban than most of the areas nearby. I say this because while all the nearby residential areas also seem to have driveways, they at least have smaller lots than Garden City, and in a lot of cases, smaller setbacks as well. The general housing stock seems identical in terms of age and mix of styles however - it just seems like Garden City was built out with wealthier residents in mind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2014, 04:23 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,110,497 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Very suburban. More suburban than your typical suburb, more "exurban" than "suburban" but without the exurban location.
In what way is it exurban? Part of it is an old railroad suburb, the rest postwar infill. All is expensive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2014, 04:25 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,110,497 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinuzzo View Post
You wouldn't say it's more developed and built-up than the average suburb? When I think of suburb, I think of something like Franklin Lakes, NJ
It's not unusually so. The Garden City lots are rather large. Compare Garden City to over spots nearby. It's mostly less dense than those.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2014, 04:29 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,110,497 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
For me, the dividing line between suburban and urban is the widespread presence of driveways. I don't see any of the residential neighborhoods in Garden City lacking driveways. It seems like it was all built out with cars in mind, albeit mostly between 1920 and 1945, so it doesn't have the same built aesthetic as postwar suburbs.
That's an odd standard. Driveways can be added by infill. Most old New England neighborhoods have driveways. Somerville has driveways, and is probably more urban than almost all Pittsburgh residential neighborhood.

Quote:
On Google Maps you can see the village boundaries, and interestingly you can directly see the zoning changes between Garden City and adjoining areas. Honestly, I'd say the residential portion looks a lot less urban than most of the areas nearby. I say this because while all the nearby residential areas also seem to have driveways, they at least have smaller lots than Garden City, and in a lot of cases, smaller setbacks as well. The general housing stock seems identical in terms of age and mix of styles however - it just seems like Garden City was built out with wealthier residents in mind.
Garden City was built and planned as a wealthy suburb. Its known for its wealth in the area. The adjacent suburbs not so much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2014, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,094 posts, read 16,138,912 times
Reputation: 12696
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
In what way is it exurban? Part of it is an old railroad suburb, the rest postwar infill. All is expensive.
As you said, most of the typical affluent suburban amenities (TD Ameritrade, Schwab, Franklin Templeton, big box shopping, outlet shopping, chain stores) are recent additions. It looks like what it is, a railroad exurb that's been swallowed up and become a bit less of a total bedroom community. But it still has total segregation of zoning whereas most suburbs are more commingled with neighborhood shopping mixed in, and a country club for every 7,500 residents.

Being built around the railroad as transportation rather than the automobile of course puts a floor on density. Form follows function. 1+ acre lots would be highly inconvenient.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top