U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-28-2014, 09:40 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14810

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I don't know if Dunkin Donuts qualifies as a coffee shop. People go there mainly for the donuts. They are a donut shop. McDonalds sells coffee too but are not considered a coffee shop. Not counting Dunkin Donuts would you say Starbucks dominates the coffee shop business on the east cost? I think they are definitely a monopoly on the west coast.
No, people go to Dunkin Donuts for the coffee more than the donuts. It's a place to stop and get coffee. The donuts are snacks, similar to the way Starbucks has snacks, too. I don't think starbucks is a monopoly, it might be #1, there a lot of independent coffee shops here. Manhattan has 201 Starbucks, so it's a monopoly there.

Blogger Vows To Visit Every Starbucks In Manhattan CBS New York

I visit Think Coffee more than any other Manhattan coffee shop:

Think Coffee - Greenwich Village - New York, NY | Yelp

Rather popular with NYU students. And oddly, Korean tourists. It made it a Korean TV show, and became a must see for Korean tourists.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-28-2014, 10:20 AM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,565,237 times
Reputation: 4048
It's kind of a different market segment, though--Dunkin Donuts coffee is plain, workmanlike drip coffee, and while they recently added espresso drinks, it's more of a niche segment of their market, while Starbuck's is much more focused on espresso drinks and their assorted caffeinated milkshakes. And while Dunkin has a rep for coffee, the proportion of their stock and display is very focused on the donuts--in Starbuck's, pastries are along the side and the coffee is front & center. Dunkin moves a lot of coffee but they're primarily a donut shop in form and function--and quality.

I'm not a big fan of Starbuck's coffee (they over-roast it for greater consistency and to balance it against the massive amount of sugar in the aforementioned caffeinated milkshakes) but Dunkin coffee is far worse. Last time I bought a cup (I like their donuts) I ended up tossing it in a trash can after a few sips. Went to Caribou instead.

We don't have Dunkin Donuts on the west coast, but Starbuck's is far from being a monopoly. Regional chains and local stores punch back at Starbuck's blow for blow--Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf in southern California, Peet's in northern California, (and Java City, RIP) and specialty third-wave shops like Blue Bottle and Temple. In Oregon and northern California they have other specialty chains like Dutch Brothers...I suppose in Seattle Starbuck's is closer to a monopoly but they're also a local coffee shop for them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2014, 12:17 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
And while Dunkin has a rep for coffee, the proportion of their stock and display is very focused on the donuts--in Starbuck's, pastries are along the side and the coffee is front & center. Dunkin moves a lot of coffee but they're primarily a donut shop in form and function--and quality.
Maybe, but it's thought of as a place to get coffee and more people go there for its coffee than the donuts. From this link 60% of sales are from coffee. I was surprised that there are fewer Dunkin Donuts than Starbucks in the US. This is why:

Starbucks vs. Dunkin Donuts - Boston.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2014, 12:47 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,943 posts, read 7,598,673 times
Reputation: 9263
While our city is full of much of the same big box and chain stores as anywhere (Walmart mostly excluded, thankfully), the downtown itself and our neighborhood in particular is quite a pro local business model. Our neighborhood especially has gone out of its way to promote the local, "no chains" aspect and has become a destination locale for others shopping or dining from all over the city because of it. Enough so that news organizations often do stories about it.

From being a down on its luck area as recently as 15 years ago it has become the darling of the urban core neighborhoods here, specifically because of its very active business community of the small village area promoting it. They started by creating a quarterly evening Walkabout, where local businesses open up their doors enticing those in with complimentary food and beverages to encourage folks to discover the neighborhood; it has been officially discovered! There were few businesses here when we moved in 17 years ago and now there are nearly 100 in a very small neighborhood, many expressly promoting locally crafted wares or food- some especially amazing like a Chocolatier/Restaurant Wine Bar, one of the best Pizzerias in the country and many unique, fun stores. I love keeping my money in the neighborhood, Christmas shopping is divine- simply walking up the street to the great friendly stores to get some great unique gifts and maybe stopping for a beer, glass of wine or coffee to chat with the proprietors and neighbors, no parking hassle or rude, stress-crazed co-shoppers to contend with. We do have one Starbuck's that snuck in and a 7 Eleven that was established decades ago but that's about it. We don't have the local hardware store anymore (that became a Yoga Studio) and it's now mostly boutiques but it still is a viable place to be and spend some money while enjoying the experience .

SOUTH PARK San Diego
http://southparkscene.com/Map.June2013.pdf - and this is out of date by a year, several new places have opened since.

I figure might spend an extra $100-200 a year for all the local shopping I do as opposed to online or big box retailers but in a purely economic standpoint I definitely am still coming out ahead. Living in a popular, walkable neighborhood full of local stores has increased our property values 10s of $1000s a year while making it even more enjoyable to live here. I honestly feel that folks who shop exclusively online (of course I do sometimes) or retailers like Walmart (never spend a penny there) are just crapping on their own community and don't care one whit about it. To build an enjoyable local community you have to support it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2014, 10:48 AM
 
10,926 posts, read 9,333,955 times
Reputation: 6621
Give me a break. There's no way they're a monopoly anywhere. How many delis, diners, and restaurants sell coffee to go or stay? In many places, though, there were the first and only place that was coffee-centric, and really introduced what could be called "coffee culture". That's why they can dominate this market. But that market is a small part of overall coffee sales, and they very often get local and other chain competition.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Starbucks is the biggest poster child for a monopoly I have ever seen. It amazes me how governments, local and federal, have allowed them to so easily and completely dominate the coffee shop business. I guess the anti-trust laws really are worthless.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2014, 03:51 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,266,947 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post

I'm not a big fan of Starbuck's coffee (they over-roast it for greater consistency and to balance it against the massive amount of sugar in the aforementioned caffeinated milkshakes)...
Maybe they can get away with doing that, because, you know, they have a monopoly or near-monopoly on the coffee shop business.




Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post

We don't have Dunkin Donuts on the west coast, but Starbuck's is far from being a monopoly. Regional chains and local stores punch back at Starbuck's blow for blow--Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf in southern California, Peet's in northern California, (and Java City, RIP) and specialty third-wave shops like Blue Bottle and Temple. In Oregon and northern California they have other specialty chains like Dutch Brothers...I suppose in Seattle Starbuck's is closer to a monopoly but they're also a local coffee shop for them.


Coffee Bean Tea & Leaf? I only remember seeing one of those in the whole of Orange County CA and maybe just one or two in the LA area that I remember coming across when I lived there. They seem to be very few and far in between (I always wondered why that is because to me their coffee tastes so much better than Starbucks and yet you can hardly find them anywhere). On the other hand, Starbucks are as common as McDonalds. You find them on almost very corner in almost every city in the country. Dunkin Donuts, Coffee Bean and others aren't even close to that kind of market saturation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
Give me a break. There's no way they're a monopoly anywhere. How many delis, diners, and restaurants sell coffee to go or stay? In many places, though, there were the first and only place that was coffee-centric, and really introduced what could be called "coffee culture". That's why they can dominate this market. But that market is a small part of overall coffee sales, and they very often get local and other chain competition.

I'm referring to the coffee shop business in particular, not just coffee. They are two different markets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2014, 04:12 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
On the other hand, Starbucks are as common as McDonalds. You find them on almost very corner in almost every city in the country. Dunkin Donuts, Coffee Bean and others aren't even close to that kind of market saturation.
Again, in the Northeast, it's Dunkin Donuts that's almost everywhere not Starbucks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2014, 09:55 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,520 posts, read 17,740,343 times
Reputation: 30806
Dunkin Donuts needs an image overhaul to compete if they don't want to be seen as a fast food donut shop.

Obviously the name should stay, but the decor screams, "Come in, buy a donut and a coffee, and get out." I am convinced their lighting, color scheme, and furniture are made to be eye-catching (in the sense of being immediately recognizable, but not attractive) but discomforting at the same time. It is stuck in 1980s environmental pychological marketing.

I am not saying they need to turn into a turn of the 20th century drawing room, but something that says 'relax with coffee' not 'toys for kids'.

In short, if Dunkin Donuts want to compete with coffeshops, it has to dress and act like a coffeeshop, no matter how competitive its product and services are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2014, 11:07 AM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,266,947 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Again, in the Northeast, it's Dunkin Donuts that's almost everywhere not Starbucks.
Are you saying Dunkin Donuts are the Starbucks of the northeast? If thats the case then its still a monopoly or near-monopoly. Or more technically an oligopoly where a few very big players dominate the market. Either way I don't think either of these large corporate chains would qualify as buying local (unless maybe you live in Seattle). They're certainly not mom and pop operations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2014, 11:17 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Are you saying Dunkin Donuts are the Starbucks of the northeast? If thats the case then its still a monopoly or near-monopoly. Or more technically an oligopoly where a few very big players dominate the market. Either way I don't think either of these large corporate chains would qualify as buying local (unless maybe you live in Seattle). They're certainly not mom and pop operations.
Dunkin Donuts is definitely a different style than Starbucks, but it has rather large part of the coffee market of the Northeast, not quite monopoly but big. Starbucks is smaller but has made big inroads in places. Still plenty of independent coffee shops for those who care. All coffee of course isn't local.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top