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Old 08-12-2014, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Within the city of Pittsburgh, most of the neighborhoods which have seen gentrification over the last few decades have been majority white. Most notable on this list is South Side and Lawrenceville, both of which were working-class white rowhouse neighborhoods which have changed dramatically. Indeed, probably more black people live in Lawrenceville today than 20 years ago, despite it being more gentrified/expensive now.

Gentrification has also hit some black neighborhoods however. The Northside of the city has some of the best Victorian housing stock, and portions of it are steadily whitening. That said, to the best of my knowledge Allegheny West and Deutschtown were never majority-black, and while the Central Northside was at one point, it was never a 90%+ black ghetto, as the gentrification process started there in the 1970s with hippies buying historic houses (e.g., before racial turnover had even faded). Still, it's been a long, block-by-block process, and will likely be a few more decades before the last of the low-income black renters are pushed out.

The other major example is East Liberty, which was around 2/3rds black but is now gentrifying rapidly. This is with heavy assist from outside agencies however - the closure of public housing projects has resulted in the poor black population of the neighborhood dropping considerably, and the local community development corporation is actively buying out problem landlords and kicking out "problem" tenants, which is having the side effect of slowly whitening the neighborhood.

The 90% black neighborhoods just don't gentrify though. I can't think of any which are even considered hip, or places where white people are willing to live, even though a few have beautiful houses and are low crime. Manchester comes close, as it's around 80% black and has some stunning remaining Victorian architecture which goes for a pretty penny. But that part of the city has little besides beautiful houses (e.g., no business district), so it's not really gentrifying with any rapidity.
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Old 08-12-2014, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Grand Boulevard in Chicago seems to be gentrifying, but it seems to be driven mostly by blacks.
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Old 08-12-2014, 10:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Agreed, though I'm not sure how that connects to what I was saying.
I was taking issue with the quote that you quoted . . . which is why I quoted it and responded to it.

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Though plenty of white people aren't bothered by living in a neighborhood 90%+ white and it seems some black people are fine with a middle class and overwhelmingly black neighborhood.
It has nothing to do with whether or not white people are bothered by living in a hyper-white neighborhood. It has everything to do with statistics. In a country that's more than 2/3 non-hispanic white it's not statistically possible to not have hyper-white neighborhoods and still have (non-white) ethnic enclaves.

Quote:
As to the bolded, there's a number in NYC. Most are Hasidic Jewish (found a 97% white tract in Borough Park) but those areas are in an ethnic ghetto in the classic sense. Except one the residents want to live apart.
meh, you could say the same thing about the amish but the Hasidim are far enough outside the mainstream and small enough in population to be irrelevant when it comes to neighborhood preferences for your average, white urban dweller.

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The most residentially segregated black neighborhoods (in the sense of overwhelming black) in NYC are middle income or well off (household income $75k +) in southeastern Queens. Most extreme example is a census tract that's 97% black and a median income of about $90k. Various historical factors are responsible, but like Prince Georges County, the residents must not be that bothered by the lack of diversity. At least in recent decades, they have the means to live elsewhere.
PG County is around 2/3 black - that's not what I would call hyper-segregated and I have a feeling your examples in Queens are going to be similar . . . cases of homophily, not segregation, where people are buying into a specific neighborhood precisely because it already has a lot of people of a shared socio-economic background.
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Old 08-12-2014, 10:48 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,963,874 times
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The 90% black neighborhoods just don't gentrify though. I can't think of any which are even considered hip, or places where white people are willing to live, even though a few have beautiful houses and are low crime. Manchester comes close, as it's around 80% black and has some stunning remaining Victorian architecture which goes for a pretty penny. But that part of the city has little besides beautiful houses (e.g., no business district), so it's not really gentrifying with any rapidity.
This is just it . . . because the trope that poor, black neighborhoods are being besieged by wealthy white people just doesn't stand up outside of a few anecdotes. The neighborhoods that are 90%+ AA are usually also poor and with all of the attendant social problems that go along with being poor. The neighborhoods that are 80%- AA are usually not poor and that other 20%+ in those neighborhoods is usually a mix of blue collar whites and latinos. In cities like Pittsburgh, Philly, and a lot of midwestern cities, there's also a high rate of homeownership in those neighborhoods so they're a lot less likely to see any rapid changes in the first place (unless there's been an extreme level of abandonment).
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Old 08-13-2014, 05:12 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
I was taking issue with the quote that you quoted . . . which is why I quoted it and responded to it.
I know you were taking issue with the quote. However, your response appeared to me to have no connection to what I was saying or my point.

Quote:
meh, you could say the same thing about the amish but the Hasidim are far enough outside the mainstream and small enough in population to be irrelevant when it comes to neighborhood preferences for your average, white urban dweller.
I didn't say they are relevant to the average urban dweller. The Amish don't count here since you said neighborhoods within cities.

Quote:
PG County is around 2/3 black - that's not what I would call hyper-segregated and I have a feeling your examples in Queens are going to be similar . . . cases of homophily, not segregation, where people are buying into a specific neighborhood precisely because it already has a lot of people of a shared socio-economic background.
I was describing both as cases of homophily, I didn't say it was hyper-segregrated. Sections of SE Queens are 90% black or near it, but others are more divers.
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