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Old 07-06-2014, 01:19 AM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,813 times
Reputation: 1953

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Depends. Apartments with rent control are like gold in the "inner Bay Area." No one leaves until they get married, seriously coupled or buy a place. :P
Yeah, and it's the same thing in New York. My dad lived in a rent controlled apartment (that he "inherited" from his aunt) for 20 years. But New York and San Francisco aren't really representative of the rest of the country.

To the limited extent that rent controls exist they're a major distortion to those local markets. When renters do move it's often for work, family, lifestyle reasons, etc. and not because of prices. Even for homeowners it's rare for people to live in the same house for more than 20 years and my dad never would've stayed there for that long (or moved back to that neighborhood in the first place) if that opportunity hadn't been available.

IMO, "rent control" should just be a part of every lease and that would mean that rents could only rise a certain % each year. You wouldn't have people staying in units for decades to enjoy ridiculously undervalued rents and as a renter you'd also be able to predict your max increase in rent from year-to-year and be less hesitant about moving in the first place knowing what to expect when you did.
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Old 07-06-2014, 01:22 AM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,813 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
This is hyperbole. There are still cities in the south with industries - I live in one of them. But I agree that poverty is migrating to the suburbs and it can be more painful because of the added car expense.
It's not hyperbole.

Sure, there's plenty of industry around but big cities don't have a monopoly on it more. There's not a strong connection anymore between blue collar jobs and urban neighborhoods. You can still have a blue collar job in a big city but you could just as well commute from the suburbs.
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Old 07-06-2014, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Madison, WI
4,811 posts, read 1,630,997 times
Reputation: 1056
Quote:
Originally Posted by RegalSin View Post
I am not going to make a big statement about this yet.

GINGERFICATION is what is it caled. Basically whiting out the world itself.

We have the gay-k-k. which are the non-heterosexuals who are really white supremacists. "Flag Wars 2003"

Then we have the yuppies ( Hipsters ) who comes into town and donate their money, wasting time in college. Over time they become pro-racism"King of the Hill HIPSTER episode"

Among them we can have some non-Europeans, so we all can say everybody is equal.

It is like a reversal racism, and you do not realize it is really a take over. Even Latin/Asian/Indian/Oriental/X-religion people do it as well. Basically buy out the entire neighborhood, get all the non-Eurpeans into lower income housings.


.................................... IT IS CALLED GINGERFICATION. If you know somebody from the HEARTLAND AMERICA, and they are an college student, in your area, staying in a dorm ( safehouse ). Chances are by the time they leave, they will have temendous hate from everything non-European, or whatever their culture is. However it works in reverse as well. People from around the world, looking for fun and excitement, and they go back home appreciating what they had all this time.


BUt the process repeats itself over and over again, till everything becomes too expensive. Basically college students are living in ghettos, that was once party stops, but are really tourist traps for the HYPE of going to college. .................................................. .................................................. ................................................. Many feminists are like this, as well as unsuspecting women, who becomes victims of this lifestyle. Men are also victims, but it does not matter, until the money runs out.
I just laughed really hard at "gingerfication" because I pictured all these red-headed people walking around the neighborhood, peeking out of their windows...camera zooms out and everything is infested with redheads haha
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Old 07-06-2014, 11:19 AM
 
5,691 posts, read 8,758,435 times
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I'd rather people didn't laugh at Regal. All these discussions about gentrification and we finally hear from someone who has been pushed out by it. It's valuable insight.
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Old 07-06-2014, 08:45 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
I'd rather people didn't laugh at Regal. All these discussions about gentrification and we finally hear from someone who has been pushed out by it. It's valuable insight.
If you can make sense of it I'll have what you're smoking . . . to me it's only partially coded, racist, homophobic ramblings that border on incoherent.

Opinions are valuable when they're at least partially fact based.
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Old 07-06-2014, 09:05 PM
 
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d c, I see it as someone who's struggling. Immigrants or yuppies have moved into his neighborhood and forced him out. It wouldn't surprise me if he has mental health issues as a challenge as well. Sure, some of the language is offensive, but he is trying to make sense of a cultural shift that has turned against our country's poor.
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Old 07-06-2014, 10:28 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,813 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
d c, I see it as someone who's struggling. Immigrants or yuppies have moved into his neighborhood and forced him out. It wouldn't surprise me if he has mental health issues as a challenge as well. Sure, some of the language is offensive, but he is trying to make sense of a cultural shift that has turned against our country's poor.
The culture of the US has always been anti-poor. The policies have also been mostly anti-poor except for the relatively brief period between FDR and Carter. All you're seeing today is the last vestiges of the social contract being broken as we slide back to the Gilded Age. The important difference between then and now is that humans are increasingly redundant as machines, the internet and apps replace a lot of us and all of the profit from those efficiencies flow to fewer and fewer people.

Mental health problems (if that's the case) have nothing to do with people who may or may not be moving in to his neighborhood. If anyone has those problems they have them regardless of where they live. In any case it's no excuse for what amounts to hate speech.

People don't move because they're black or white or gay or straight - they move because they want a different house or because they want to be closer to work, family, friends, a park, fresh air, whatever. No one is helping anyone or advancing the conversation by spouting bigoted misinformation.
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Old 07-07-2014, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,923,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
This is hyperbole. There are still cities in the south with industries - I live in one of them. But I agree that poverty is migrating to the suburbs and it can be more painful because of the added car expense.
I'm guessing that in most cases southern cities which still have industry don't have the typology that northern cities used to - basically having the mill adjacent to the residential area, allowing local working-class people to walk to work. This was how the rust-belt cities traditionally worked through the early 1980s. No longer. Even if there is some industry left in the cities, generally the factories left employ only a few dozen people at most, to the point that the "neighborhood industrial district" is not much of a community asset.

In our city, it was announced recently that our floundering local newspaper is selling its building to cut costs. The editorial staff will continue to work downtown in rented space somewhere. But the pressmen (who had the last manufacturing jobs downtown) will be relocated to an industrial park out near the airport. While these are good unionized jobs, and by no means poverty level, this is a side of "gentrification" - the displacement of jobs - which is seldom discussed. Blue-collar jobs require huge square footage compared to office jobs, and there's really no way to integrate them into the modern "mixed use" walkable neighborhood.

Or, for that matter, I can discuss how my neighborhood has changed as it gentrified. Seven years back, when I first bought a home here, parking was easy. Often when I got off the bus a bit early I would find my car was the only one on the street, because all my neighbors who actually had cars drove to work - since they didn't work Downtown and didn't have a choice. As gentrification has continued, and a bus has been added to the university district, things have changed. Now not only are there twice as many cars on the street, but the cars never move. Most new residents take the bus to work professional jobs, bike, or work from home. But they mostly still own cars which sit idle most of the week.
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Old 07-07-2014, 02:28 PM
 
5,691 posts, read 8,758,435 times
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There are some large industrial operations, and in my neighborhood a sewing operation, that employ a lot of people. But d c is right, a lot of the workers commute in from the suburbs and rural areas. The high skill worers (machinists) likely want something nicer and the lower skill workers something cheaper (rural trailer).
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Old 07-07-2014, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,110,077 times
Reputation: 3982
I can see what the OP means. In Los Angeles the former would be places like Highland Park, Boyle Heights and Culver City. The latter would be places like Koreatown, Hollywood and the Historic Core.

Not sure it is so cut-and-dry that it's an either-or situation as there are places that fit both criteria.
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