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Old 05-03-2015, 07:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by the city View Post
A suburb today can be a city under the influence of a larger urban area. Where as a suburb of the 60s, the one I think of, is a white-picket fence suburban housing developments with a mall, schools, churches, parks, markets, and a 80% of the population commuting into the city for work and usually incorporated due being able having large retail tax revenue.
I think you're mixing up different types of suburbs. The white-picket-fence suburban is associated with the Levittowns, which did not have much retail; Levittown, NY and Levittown, PA were not incorporated, while Levittown, NJ took over the existing Willingboro Township.

Not sure where the complete planned suburban community concept arose; the best example I know of is Columbia, Maryland. Columbia is neither incorporated (it's organized as a homeowners association) nor a bedroom community; it was always intended to be a city in its own right, with job centers, and while I'm not sure how well that worked out, I suspect most of its commuters are suburb to suburb.
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Old 05-03-2015, 08:10 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,892,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
I think you're mixing up different types of suburbs. The white-picket-fence suburban is associated with the Levittowns, which did not have much retail; Levittown, NY and Levittown, PA were not incorporated, while Levittown, NJ took over the existing Willingboro Township.

Not sure where the complete planned suburban community concept arose; the best example I know of is Columbia, Maryland. Columbia is neither incorporated (it's organized as a homeowners association) nor a bedroom community; it was always intended to be a city in its own right, with job centers, and while I'm not sure how well that worked out, I suspect most of its commuters are suburb to suburb.
Then that's a planned city like Irvine.

There are planned bedroom communities too like Ladera Ranch.
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Old 05-04-2015, 09:48 AM
 
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Of course Ferguson is a suburb. Words have different meanings in different contexts. In the political sense, yes it is a "city" because it has its own municipal government. But many suburbs have their own municipal governments. It is still a suburb of St. Louis.
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Old 05-04-2015, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,111,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
In California, it's hard to say what is a suburb and not these days since there are centers of employment scattered across all urban areas. A true, like a bedroom community, will have limited economic engines and be a place where people sleep, eat, and shop.

I think now a days the correct term would be a bedroom community. When I think of a suburb, I think of a suburb as a residential community within a large city like how much of the San Fernando Valley in LA was. It was clear the suburbs were bedroom communities to LA. Now, you can have a suburb be a bedroom community to several different cities.

Do any states in CA still use the term "suburb" officially anymore in any city planning policies or laws? If I believe correctly, there hasn't been a definition of what a suburb is since the 60s.
These days, with Universal City, Studio City, Encino/Van Nuys/Sherman Oaks, Warner Center, and the Canoga industrial areas, the San Fernando Valley has quite a few job centers and is not really a bedroom community anymore. It would be difficult to categorize many areas of the SFV as being suburban. I personally find the San Gabriel Valley to be more suburban in a traditional sense of a bedroom community - other than Pasadena and City of Industry there are very few job centers.
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Old 05-04-2015, 01:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by stateofnature View Post
Of course Ferguson is a suburb. Words have different meanings in different contexts. In the political sense, yes it is a "city" because it has its own municipal government. But many suburbs have their own municipal governments. It is still a suburb of St. Louis.
Then define "suburb".
In the legal sense it is a city just as St. Louis is a city. Ferguson is not part of St. Louis.
If Ferguson is a "suburb" of St. Louis, then St. Louis is a suburb of Ferguson.


sub:= under, below, beneath
urban:= characteristic of a city or town

As its own city, Ferguson is certainly not a "suburb" nor "suburban" by definition.
Because it is an incorporated area with a municipal government just like neighboring St. Louis, it is not a "suburb" of St. Louis any more than St. Louis is a suburb of Ferguson.
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Old 05-04-2015, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
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Ferguson is a small railroad town founded near the end of the 19th century, that turned into a streetcar suburb at the beggining of the 20th century, reached its pinnacle as a post war spawlsville, and is now a declining inner ring suburb in the greater St. Louis area. With about 20,000, Ferguson holds a little less than 1% of the St. Louis regional population of 2,800,000. Ferguson is NOT a city in the traditional since. It may be a township or a municipality, but it is definitely NOT a city in the sense of having primacy in the metro area. Its definitely not the Fort Worth or St. Paul or Newark or even Long Beach to St. Louis City.
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Old 05-04-2015, 01:55 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
Ferguson is a small railroad town founded near the end of the 19th century, that turned into a streetcar suburb at the beggining of the 20th century, reached its pinnacle as a post war spawlsville, and is now a declining inner ring suburb in the greater St. Louis area. With about 20,000, Ferguson holds a little less than 1% of the St. Louis regional population of 2,800,000. Ferguson is NOT a city in the traditional since. It may be a township or a municipality, but it is definitely NOT a city in the sense of having primacy in the metro area. Its definitely not the Fort Worth or St. Paul or Newark or even Long Beach to St. Louis City.
It's a city. It's legally organized as a city.
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Old 05-04-2015, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,627,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Then define "suburb".
In the legal sense it is a city just as St. Louis is a city. Ferguson is not part of St. Louis.
If Ferguson is a "suburb" of St. Louis, then St. Louis is a suburb of Ferguson.


sub:= under, below, beneath
urban:= characteristic of a city or town

As its own city, Ferguson is certainly not a "suburb" nor "suburban" by definition.
Because it is an incorporated area with a municipal government just like neighboring St. Louis, it is not a "suburb" of St. Louis any more than St. Louis is a suburb of Ferguson.
Now that's a stretch and factually incorrect.

Suburb - (Noun) - a district lying immediately outside a city or town, especially a smaller residential community.

St. Louis is THE PRINCIPAL CITY in the greater urbanized area of Metro St. Louis. By definition, St. Louis could not be a "suburb" of Ferguson, for the simple fact that the urbanized area is contiguous and Ferguson is a much smaller municipality woven into that larger urban fabric of Greater St. Louis. I feel that the media gave an inaccurate portrayal of what Ferguson is, its not a "small town", its not a "struggling little city", its a declining inner ring suburb of St. Louis. Its like people have this idea that Ferguson is some small town in the middle of a cornfield 30 miles from the urban fabric, when its actually part of the urban sprawl. Ferguson is not be any means a self sustaining city and if St. Louis were to fall off and float down the Mississippi River, Ferguson would cease to exist in the capacity it does today.
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Old 05-04-2015, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,627,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
It's a city. It's legally organized as a city.
Its a municipality.
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Old 05-04-2015, 02:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
Its a municipality.
It is called the city of Ferguson: Ferguson, MO - Official Website | Official Website
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