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Old 07-16-2014, 08:22 PM
 
Location: CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Here's your logic fail, assuming the bold. Plenty of suburbs in metro Denver are " cohesive, connected, and contiguous communit(ies)". I'm not sure what a "contiguous" community is, anyway. The suburb I live in has plenty of community spirit. So do most all the Denver burbs. The big, bad, behemoth, Aurora, certainly is a city in its own right; it has everything most cities have including the University of Colorado health science center campus, which includes the U of CO Hospital, Children's Hospital of Colorado, a VA hospital, the medical, dental, physical therapy and public health schools of CO, and much more.
I think one of the biggest issues with Aurora is that there is no real "downtown" as stipulated by the OP. Yes, they have a revitalized "arts district" but that's not quite the same. Aurora is now the hub for medical centers so it is self-sustaining in that people can live and work in the same town, but if people in Aurora talk about "going downtown" they mean Denver. This is true of many of Denver's suburb-cities. Even Centennial and Highlands Ranch can't claim a downtown, whereas nearby Englewood and Littleton can. If a real downtown matters, this does make a difference.
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Old 07-16-2014, 08:39 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,991 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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True, but, some of that "downtown" stuff is a matter of semantics. Littleton's downtown is mostly restaurants, galleries and such. You don't really go there to buy things you really need. I haven't been to d/t Englewood in ages; I'm guessing it's similar.
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Old 07-16-2014, 08:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Here's your logic fail, assuming the bold. Plenty of suburbs in metro Denver are " cohesive, connected, and contiguous communit(ies)". I'm not sure what a "contiguous" community is, anyway. The suburb I live in has plenty of community spirit. So do most all the Denver burbs. The big, bad, behemoth, Aurora, certainly is a city in its own right; it has everything most cities have including the University of Colorado health science center campus, which includes the U of CO Hospital, Children's Hospital of Colorado, a VA hospital, the medical, dental, physical therapy and public health schools of CO, and much more.
I'm talking about how many suburbs aren't physically contiguous. Think cul-de-sacs and subdivisions. The communities can and often do have community spirit; suburbs can have those as much as any other kind of development. But the problem is that sometimes those communities develop as separate entities from one another and this deprives them of interaction with one another. You end up with tightly knit communities that aren't connected at all to one another. It's great for those small communities, but it's detrimental to the larger metro community. Being raised in a suburb, I've seen this personally. Everyone knows everyone within their borders, but other subdivisions are mysterious unexplored lands full of strange beings. It makes the overall metro community seem smaller than it is, and while this might seem like a benefit to some, it makes the whole metro pretty provincial and closed-off, and thus unwilling to progress and accept new ideas or people. The small town, everyone-knows-everyone mentality is nice, but when it is isolated from the rest of the community it's not quite so great. And it's the result of modern land development methods that usually take place in today's suburbs.
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Old 07-16-2014, 09:43 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,673,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
True, but, some of that "downtown" stuff is a matter of semantics. Littleton's downtown is mostly restaurants, galleries and such. You don't really go there to buy things you really need. I haven't been to d/t Englewood in ages; I'm guessing it's similar.
That's an interesting point, but I have to counter that a centrallized area/downtown is usually what connects the city to the outside world. When outsiders go to [insert city/town name here], they usually look for the place where everything is-the jobs, the hotels, the bars and restaurants, the shops, etc. While some things might be further out, people coming to an unfamiliar city generally look for where everything is concentrated for ease of navigation; if a city is more decentralized, it will be harder to navigate. Basically, centralization makes the city more accessible to outsiders and thus better connects it to other communities.
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Old 07-16-2014, 10:07 PM
 
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Folks who grew up in suburbs are already pretty used to cities without a center. Of course suburbs can be cities, they're just generally not very interesting ones.
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Old 07-16-2014, 10:34 PM
 
Location: CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Folks who grew up in suburbs are already pretty used to cities without a center. Of course suburbs can be cities, they're just generally not very interesting ones.
But on the other hand, we are used to having the amenities of the big city close by, but with the added value to many of us of being close to everyday needs such as supermarkets, big box stores, and the like. And don't forget the advent of the "urban lifestyle destination" which has replaced many former suburban shopping malls, offering retail and residential mix. These faux town centers present a welcoming appearance with tree-lined shopping streets, fountains, sidewalk restaurants, and mainly- people - interacting and enjoying the feel of a "downtown."
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Old 07-17-2014, 01:48 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Large suburbs can be cities for sure (e.g. Parramatta in western Sydney).

A small suburb is just a suburb or a 'town'.
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Old 07-17-2014, 02:15 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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Suburbs are smaller cities where the wealthier choose to live to avoid the hustle and bustle of the big city. Either because it's too crowded, the crime is too high, or they just want somewhere with more land.

What's interesting, and what many people in suburbs probably don't realize, is how dependent their suburb is on the city metro they are apart of. Franklin Tennessee would be nothing without Nasvhille, Carmel Indiana would be nothing without Indianapolis, Mountain Brooke Alabama would be nothing without Birmingham, Madison Mississippi would be nothing without Jackson. Even though they take the wealthiest and most well to do citizens and some very bright urban planners who are creating the ultimate walkable small town complete with lots of nostalgic looking store fronts, these suburbs can't really exist on their own. Most of their citizens work in the city.

Where the line gets kind of hazy is in the much larger cities. The Inland Empire in California is a host of cities living together, all interconnected and interdependent. Besides Los Angeles, there really is no host city, and none are typical suburbs, just small municipalities, and lots of them.

Newark New Jersey wouldn't be what it is without New York City, but it is truly an independent city, across state lines with its own bustling downtown, own mayor, own city laws, etc.

Then you have cities like Atlanta which are ruled by the suburbs. 430,000 people in Atlanta, over 5.5 million in the metro. 5 million people live in suburbs, not the city.
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Old 07-17-2014, 02:17 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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Hope there are no Fort Worth posters around, but isn't Fort Worth a suburb of Dallas?
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Old 07-17-2014, 05:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Hope there are no Fort Worth posters around, but isn't Fort Worth a suburb of Dallas?
No Fort Worth existed before suburbia and has it's own economic distinction. It exists with or without the influence of Dallas.
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