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Old 07-30-2014, 09:33 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
As we all know, statisitics don't mean much regarding individual people.
Ancedotes aren't a good way to make a general statement, though they sometimes ok for giving more detail or contradicting someone posting an overgeneralizing.

Quote:
There is no question the movement to the suburbs hugely accelerated in the post war years, and I don't mean post Vietnam or Desert Storm, I mean WWII. We've only talked about this for the past 4 years of this forum, with people posting supposedly horrifying pictures of the first Levittown, etc. Taking a look at Pittsburgh's population, the city's population reached its peak in 1950. Pittsburgh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The metro area, however, continued to grow until 1970,when the steel industry started to decline. In fact, the metro grew about 50% from 1950 to 1960.
Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States - Peakbagger.com
That doesn't disagree with what I was saying, though.

Yes, the movement to suburbs accelerated or started at the beginning of the postwar years, but it didn't stop after a decade or two. One of your examples, Pittsburgh continued to decline population after 1970, although its at the high end of decline compared to most cities due to economic collapse. I could bring up other numbers later, drivecarephilly has shown some good neighborhood numbers showing post 1970 decline, at least of the white population (previous city residents).

 
Old 07-30-2014, 09:40 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
^^Pittsburgh is one of the whitest cities in the country.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,651,778 times
Reputation: 35449
Interesting comments based on generalities. People will do whatever they have to do depending upon their individual circumstances. There are a lot of assumptions being made here as to how everyone lives. Maybe it's the norm maybe not.

I am a Senior Citizen of 68 years. I detest the appellation of "Baby Boomer" but I am in that category many are using to describe my generation.

I have never owned a car and have always used public transportation to get around. I grew up in Chicago but lived in the PNW for 36 years. I recently moved to a rust belt city because it was much less expensive and my retirement income goes a whole lot farther. I still don't drive. The public transportation is good enough for me. I am in an inner ring suburb which also offers a pick up service that will take me to doctor appointments, grocery stores etc. The RTA, our transit system also has this service for seniors. Many cities have these services.

Many older people who no longer drive live in over 55 communities which have vans to take them where they need to go. Some have friends or relatives who can help out. After my dad who was healthy enough to drive well until his upper 80's retired, he was happy to drive his friends around who could no longer drive.

No one need worry when people of any age are unable to drive. That's been happening for decades. They work it out. I just think it's sad how much human beings have become such slaves to their automobiles that there is so much concern as to the possibility of living without them.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
56 posts, read 27,493 times
Reputation: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Your dad is one person. I'm glad he's getting around. However, having worked with many elderly as a visiting nurse, it's more likely that by the time they can't drive, they can't walk to the bus stop or down the street to the coffee shop, either.
I'm not sure you can generalize the experiences of elderly people who need visiting nurses to the elderly demographic at large.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 10:05 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^Pittsburgh is one of the whitest cities in the country.
Yes, I know.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 10:41 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemissa View Post
I'm not sure you can generalize the experiences of elderly people who need visiting nurses to the elderly demographic at large.
I have worked in senior wellness programs. Point is I've seen a lot of seniors, not just my relatives.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,371 posts, read 21,218,356 times
Reputation: 24208
Similar responses could be obtained with the question: You've had too many DUI's, will never drive again, how do you cope?

Meet my roommate, in his 50's, who will never drive again, too many DUI's!

And? With his bike with a super big basket, after 6 years, doesn't even miss driving his car!
 
Old 07-31-2014, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,327,543 times
Reputation: 3562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh, for Ford's Sake! Can the armchair psychology, Dr. Sigmund Fraud. rwiksell's parents do not have dementia. They are in their 60s! They're probably still working. Surely you have co-workers in their 60s who you consider your colleagues. Adult kids regularly tell their parents to "MYOB", and we parents have learned to NEVER offer advice. These people have managed their affairs successfully for 40+years. Why do they need some whippersnapper telling them to sell their house b/c the whippersnapper, not the parents, thinks it's too big? The whipper also thinks there's going to be a housing crash. Well, maybe there will be and maybe there won't be. The parents are still likely to get way more back than they paid for the house.
Thanks for always being such a wonderful example.
 
Old 07-31-2014, 06:52 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Thanks for always being such a wonderful example.
Of what?
 
Old 07-31-2014, 07:40 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,877 posts, read 42,085,992 times
Reputation: 43276
Montanamama:

The Millenial Generation is larger than the Baby Boomers. They're called the Baby Boom Echo for a reason.

The Echo Boom Or Millenial Generation Impact.
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