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Old 07-31-2014, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
3,044 posts, read 4,014,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
As everyone knows, the 70-80 million boomers will reach geezerhood shortly. Many will lose thir driving ability. While most will be retired so getting to work not an issue, they still need to get around. Quite a few will try to age in place. Not all have children willing to drive them. Since many, if not most, live in suburbs devoid of anything walkable or local mass transit (though they may have commuter trains to center city). What will happen. Driving enthusiasts note: this could happen to you someday.
In the beautiful Okanagan, land of newly weds and nearly deads, we have a large number of kids driving, and seniors not giving up their lifelong right to drive. Even for summer the cities give trucks out to kids that OBVIOUSLY haven't driven much, and it shows. For seniors, the trucks aren't big enough. They usually drag the boat around with the diesel.

I don't make left hand turns, and park as soon as I'm downtown. Avoid the new WalMart at all costs,
including the imaginary savings, and don't drive unless you have to. Pull over often, and let the RV's
continue on. Get extra insurance. Plan your outing.

 
Old 07-31-2014, 03:20 PM
 
Location: LA, CA/ In This Time and Place
5,433 posts, read 3,504,915 times
Reputation: 5063
If they have sense and decency then they would stop driving. I wish more elderly people would stop driving if they can't drive. Some do drive well though.
 
Old 07-31-2014, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
6,105 posts, read 7,263,306 times
Reputation: 4485
More cities and towns are looking into increasing shuttle services or adding services if none are in place.
 
Old 07-31-2014, 05:25 PM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,621,421 times
Reputation: 4358
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
As everyone knows, the 70-80 million boomers will reach geezerhood shortly. Many will lose thir driving ability. While most will be retired so getting to work not an issue, they still need to get around. Quite a few will try to age in place. Not all have children willing to drive them. Since many, if not most, live in suburbs devoid of anything walkable or local mass transit (though they may have commuter trains to center city). What will happen. Driving enthusiasts note: this could happen to you someday.
Dear builders did not account for that part...they're screwed. Especially in FL! Here they go missing and get into accidents! Or run into post offices.... Take your pick...that's when they're not dead on the front lawn from heat exhaustion working hard to keep the lawn nice for the HOA's to stop b'ing.
 
Old 07-31-2014, 06:27 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,827,437 times
Reputation: 9769
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Why has the boomer generation always resented the "greatest generation"?
Partly because the name is obnoxious. Blame Tom Brokaw, he coined it. Kinda near topic: My grandfather fought in WWII and is thus in that generation; he still drives though not much. The small generation in between is the "Silent Generation" or the "Lucky Few" according to Wikipeidia.

The reason the boomers, SPECIFICALLY, resent them is they are the boomers' parents.
 
Old 07-31-2014, 07:19 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,999 posts, read 102,581,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montanama View Post
Thanks for the link; I hadn't heard them called that.

In this case, the linked articles from the beginning of this thread both rely on, essentially, the idea that the next wave of homebuyers won't want larger, suburban homes because....they aren't cool?

Am I missing something?

I am not a newbie to real estate/markets. I can buy that IF most Boomers choose to downsize (which is not a given) and/or WHEN most Boomers die and their houses are sold, that there will be a plentiful supply of "move-up" level larger suburban houses, which would likely soften prices. In some areas.

A crash the likes of 2008?

Because hipsters want to live in cool urban neighborhoods?

This is silly.
Darn right it's not a given. Our parents didn't do that to any great extent. Neither did "The Silents". Why should we?

Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
What a terrifying thought. The baby boom generation has a history of selfishness, so my guess is that a lot of them will refuse to relinquish their keys and drive anyway. I bet they use their numbers and financial influence to change the laws to protect their "driving rights". In ten years the roads will be packed full of elderly boomers who cant see, forget where they are and mix up the gas and break peddles. No mailbox will be safe, pedestrians will have to run from their lives and our highways will be like a demolition derby. Look at the parts of Florida which are clogged with retirees in the winter, their roads are horrible to drive on because of this, that is what all of America will look like. The "greatest generation" had more of a sense of civic duty, most of them understood that old age made driving unsafe. The boomers are a whole different animal, they are and always have been out for themselves.
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Why has the boomer generation always resented the "greatest generation"? Anytime someone says something positive about them, boomers chime in about their flaws or shortcomings. It was that generations time tested values that the boomer rebellion (60s and 70s) was so focused on. Even after the boomers won that battle (by changing America beyond recognition), the boomers still feel threatened by the greatest generations acomplishments and contributions. The greatest generation won the world war, created the wealth that we still today take advantage of, and they attempted to preserve traditional values in the face of 60s insanity. That older generation loved America and was concerned with the country as a whole, not just individual goals. The difference is clear even in this post. Boomers want to have it their way right to the end, they want self driving cars created for their old age, REALLY? I do not want to drive on roads with driverless cars, no way that is safe and it never will be. A human needs to be in control of their vehicle. If that means millions of boomers have to go live in a facility and rely on others for help in their old age then then that is what it means. What makes the boomer think he is so special??? every other generation has faced this reality, the boomers will too. My generation (generation X) is right behind the boomers, we are now middle aged and in 20 years we will also begin face aging issues. Twenty years is not that long, but aging is something we all must face. I truly hope I can face it with dignity when it comes.
Good Grief! Someone got up on the wrong side of bed!
************************************************** *

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
You contradicted yourself. You said:



But you had already said:



It doesn't look like the Greatest Generation has been any better than one can expect of any other.

More likely, as I have said, we Boomers will demand that automation keep us on the road longer.

Preferrably, there will be a device that will notice if we have hade a heart attack and steer the car right to the nearest emergency room.

And if we have Alzheimer's, the car should know where we intended to go and just go there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
No I did not contradict myself, those retirees in Florida are not of the "greatest generation", as most of them have already passed on. Todays Florida retirees are those just a few years older than the boomers. We are talking about people born in the 30s and 40s that are not quite boomers, but certainly not the "greatest generation". They are the ones who were teens in the 50s, sock hops, poodle skirts etc. Also a lot of the Florida retirees are in fact the first wave of baby boomers, those in their late 60s. Think of WW2 vets, the are of the "greatest generation" and as we all know they are hard to find these days. Most of them have gone to the Lord.
I have news for you, danielj. People have been complaining about elderly Florida drivers for decades, since the Greatest Generation started retiring down there. Even now, the OLDEST Boomers are just this year turning 68. Most of us are still working.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
Dear builders did not account for that part...they're screwed. Especially in FL! Here they go missing and get into accidents! Or run into post offices.... Take your pick...that's when they're not dead on the front lawn from heat exhaustion working hard to keep the lawn nice for the HOA's to stop b'ing.
See above.
 
Old 07-31-2014, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,507,136 times
Reputation: 15950
The "Greatest Generation" is also the first "statist" generation; for better or worse, no generation before them had its lives so completely intertwined with the workings of government.

In fairness, this is a phenomenon happening in every industrialized democracy, and much of the framework was laid out in places like Britain, Germany and Scandinavia well before the stresses of Depression and global war essentially forced its application here. Putin and the usual collection of Islamic hot-heads aside, economic integration has likely mitigated the chances of a global-level conflict.

But the larger economic arena also increases the temptation to tie down more "safety valves" , pushing the entire process further into uncharted territory and straining the relationships between nations -- so we don't know what's going to happen if the current shaky accommodation between the mature and developing economies is further strained. We ned to recognize that we already have an example of an entire nation damaged by unrealistic plans and expectations --- and for whatever reason, it's Japan -- the most insular of the mature economies, the oldest in terms of median age, and luckily for all of us, the one least capable of a return to militarism.

And it needs to be emphasized that while the generation that clawed its way out of the Depression and fought the war the saved Western civilization is no more to be blamed than the generation that steered us through a prosperity that extended more of the benefits of life in a mature economy to more of us -- diminishing, if not eliminating many of the old obstacles of racial, sexual, and other forms of discrimination.

It appears to be central to the character of a lot of people involved in "Urban Planning" that they view themselves as guardians of a finite, if not shrinking supply of resources. But options for personal transportation and mobility represent a technology that evolved and expanded as the economy grew; therefore, the path toward further evolution toward a more efficient system can more easily borrow from what worked before.

In other words, when there's not enough bread to go around, the best solution is to find a way to bake more bread, rather than to ration a supply which too many pessimists see as fixed.

The old adage to "think globally, and act locally" should not be a generational issue.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 07-31-2014 at 08:40 PM..
 
Old 07-31-2014, 08:10 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
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Please keep any discussion on urban planning, general generation discussions is off topic for the forum.
 
Old 07-31-2014, 08:14 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,883,976 times
Reputation: 23217
Our county has a transportation system for seniors and handicapped. Some people pay a small fee; others pay nothing. You give them a call and set up a time. They even go into the next county for medical appointments.
 
Old 07-31-2014, 09:59 PM
 
6,353 posts, read 5,158,773 times
Reputation: 8527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
You contradicted yourself. You said:



But you had already said:



It doesn't look like the Greatest Generation has been any better than one can expect of any other.

More likely, as I have said, we Boomers will demand that automation keep us on the road longer.

Preferrably, there will be a device that will notice if we have hade a heart attack and steer the car right to the nearest emergency room.

And if we have Alzheimer's, the car should know where we intended to go and just go there.
Yeah, that was some post. Better to disregard it.

Anyway, we're going to ride around in driverless cars. Sooner than you think. Until then, we'll take Uber, and Lyft, and you name it the market will come up with it.
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