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Old 07-29-2014, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I can think of plenty of people of Baby Boomer-ish generation who grew up in a city and moved out to the suburbs.
Well that is not what is talked about on this forum. We talk about how people started leaving "the city" in the 1950s. Those heads of households were members of The Greatest Generation.

 
Old 07-30-2014, 06:13 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,169,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well that is not what is talked about on this forum. We talk about how people started leaving "the city" in the 1950s. Those heads of households were members of The Greatest Generation.
Eh. I've started stated the leaving to the suburbs continued past 1970. Note: started, not ended.

Last edited by nei; 07-30-2014 at 06:25 AM..
 
Old 07-30-2014, 06:20 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
I'm not claiming any such dichotomy. Most of those in-between places are suburban.
If you're talking about the NYC metro area, barely half of the in-between is suburban; the rest is outer boroughs, and a number of old satellite cities and suburbs. Most other metros the majority is suburban, but there's often a large difference from the outer burbs and the inner burbs, but it depends on where.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Eh. I've started stated the leaving to the suburbs continued past 1970. Note: started, not ended.
Continued, perhaps. Started in the 50s. And the early 70s were more the Silent Generation's purview than the Boomers, who just started turning 25 in 1971. The birth rate didn't hit its peak until 1957, so by 1970 those people were 13 years old, not exactly prime household-forming age. Many "Greatests" were still buying houses in the 70s as well.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 07:35 AM
 
20,306 posts, read 11,268,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well that is not what is talked about on this forum. We talk about how people started leaving "the city" in the 1950s. Those heads of households were members of The Greatest Generation.
There was also a mass migration of Greatest Generation from the farms to the suburbs. They were going to the suburbs from both directions.

It should be noted that the development of suburbs was both marketed and subsidized by the federal government for veterans. The soldier moving off the farm with his new wife didn't really have a desirable option to move into the urban area. Choice: Off the spacious farm into an expensive old row house or apartment versus off the spacious farm into a nice, inexpensive all-modern tract house with a yard. No contest.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 07:38 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Continued, perhaps. Started in the 50s. And the early 70s were more the Silent Generation's purview than the Boomers, who just started turning 25 in 1971. The birth rate didn't hit its peak until 1957, so by 1970 those people were 13 years old, not exactly prime household-forming age. Many "Greatests" were still buying houses in the 70s as well.
Ok, however what I was referring to, the parents of people I know moved in the 80s or late 70s.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 07:39 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
There was also a mass migration of Greatest Generation from the farms to the suburbs. They were going to the suburbs from both directions.
How big was this movement? I certainly haven't met many people whose families were farmers and moved to the burbs.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 07:40 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,004 posts, read 42,337,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
How big was this movement? I certainly haven't met many people whose families were farmers and moved to the burbs.
The people who got out of farming and sold their land to developers had to go somewhere.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,356,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwiksell View Post
I've learned my lesson trying to debate with you in the Kansas City forum, so I'll say my peace and call it good, especially since you are addressing my opinion of my own parents. I doubt you'll consider my perspective, since you never do. But here goes..

I'm not saying they've got one foot in the grave. But I happen to know (because they're MY parents) that they will be retiring within the next five years, and aren't going to want to keep paying to maintain 3 times as much space as they need, on a fixed income. I'm sure their health will be fine for many years, so that's not the issue.

And yes, they're free to make their own decisions. But as the eldest child, I take responsibility for at least engaging them in discussion, and presenting the facts as best I can. How can you claim it's none of my business? Perhaps you mean that it's none of your business!
People saying "it's none of your business" are people who are fearful of their own situation and in my opinion will only hurt themselves. Having a child as thoughtful as you to be thinking of their well-being and ability to enjoy their later years without being restricted is a wonderful thing. IMO our society would be so much better off if people were responsible enough to be open to discussing these sorts of things collaboratively to make things better for everyone.
 
Old 07-30-2014, 07:47 AM
 
20,306 posts, read 11,268,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I can think of plenty of people of Baby Boomer-ish generation who grew up in a city and moved out to the suburbs.
The suburbs continued to be cheaper than the city by the square foot through all of the 20th century.

It has been alluded to before, but there isn't really a difference in generations in this specific aspect but more a difference in lifestyles.

People who marry and have children wil most often want more space. "Married with children" households have traditionally demanded more interior room, bigger yards, et cetera. Generation has not particularly mattered in this regard (yes, there will be people who want to raise their kids in urban apartments "Family Affair" style, but they are statistical outliers).

There is also an effect of relativity compromised with price in this regard. A married couple living in a small NYC apartment planning a child may satisfy their "more space" family requirement merely by moving into a townhouse...but the "more space" desire still applied.

Where there may eventually prove to be a difference is in the proportion of "married with children" households versus "no children" households from one generation to the next. But it remains to be seen how that will pan out for Millennials, whose lifestyle progression has been slowed by at least a decade by a poor job economy. We'll have to wait until Millennials are in their late 30s and early 40s before we can make judgments instead of predictions.
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