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Old 08-03-2014, 05:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, yes. That is what I was trying to say.

There's actually more of a total lack of interest in schools by the urbanists than anything else.
I think it depends on who it is, as some are going the private route anyway. So, public schools may not be an option for some urbanists if they have children. Some may deal with the public schools anyway, in spite of general information, as they may be more involved in their children's education and certain schools may have program options that may interest some parents(gifted, IB, vocational, tech, arts, etc).
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Old 08-03-2014, 06:19 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I think it depends on who it is, as some are going the private route anyway. So, public schools may not be an option for some urbanists if they have children. Some may deal with the public schools anyway, in spite of general information, as they may be more involved in their children's education and certain schools may have program options that may interest some parents(gifted, IB, vocational, tech, arts, etc).
There are only a couple of urbanists posting regularly here that have kids. Neither have kids in school, although, IIRC, one child is soon to start. That child is going to some sort of a charter or magnet school. The other poster actually lives in a suburb and there is a K-8 school (standard neighborhood school) in his neighborhood. In general, it seems that urbanists like these charters and magnets as they are free, and they don't have to worry (or care) about the quality of their neighborhood schools b/c they aren't going to use them anyway. Failing schools generally don't have gifted, IB and arts programs, though some may have vocational and tech in the high schools. Excuse my cynicism.
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Old 08-03-2014, 06:32 PM
 
Location: State of Denial
111 posts, read 114,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luzianne View Post
There is definitely a push toward urban living. Why not just let people do what they want instead of trying to convince people that urban living is better? I've definitely seen people try to push urban living, especially in the last year...


That's because we know better than you.
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Old 08-03-2014, 11:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired at 44 View Post
That's because we know better than you.
I seriously doubt that. I have more life experience. I have seen trends come and go. This is a trend. But even if a whole lot of people decide to move to urban areas, there are still going to be more people NOT in urban areas. Then 20 or 30 years from now, those people living like sardines in urban areas will want more space, a yard, some land, and they will move out from the core again.
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Old 08-04-2014, 06:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luzianne View Post
I seriously doubt that. I have more life experience. I have seen trends come and go. This is a trend. But even if a whole lot of people decide to move to urban areas, there are still going to be more people NOT in urban areas. Then 20 or 30 years from now, those people living like sardines in urban areas will want more space, a yard, some land, and they will move out from the core again.
I think they were being satirical.

Regardless, how do you know the people will move back to the suburbs? Who's to say they won't just stay on the city and stick it out? I'm not saying for sure this will happen, and I'm sure many will move back, but you can't just automatically assume they will move back no matter what. It's not guaranteed.

Also, you speak as if urban areas don't have homes with yards and land. That's a stereotype. There are many single-family homes in urban areas with yards and land to go with them. Not every city is NYC and packed to the brim with brownstones and apartments with zero land (and even then NYC has some spacier homes outside Manhattan).
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Old 08-04-2014, 07:30 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luzianne View Post
But even if a whole lot of people decide to move to urban areas, there are still going to be more people NOT in urban areas. Then 20 or 30 years from now, those people living like sardines in urban areas will want more space, a yard, some land, and they will move out from the core again.
And some probably will. People move in and out all the time. Some of course will leave, maybe some younger people will take their place. Some space is nice, but some people see no benefit in lots of it or a big yard.

As one regular poster complained about similarly worded thread, but hasn't for this thread, any thread with starting with a "why" takes for granted the title is describing something actually happening. Others don't think that there's anyone forcing an urban lifestyle at all, the OP wrote it as a given.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
We're seeing some "Push" here in New Hampshire from HUD and the local "Granite State Future". Even ignoring the paranoia about Agenda 21, there is a definite push; in my small NH town the RPC is pushing to change zoning to encourage higher density in-town housing and discourage turning idled farmland into housing developments.
I don't think higher zoning is forcing anyone, especially in a small town area. Zoning usually sets maximum densities not minimum densities, it's not forcing high density on people. And you could argue the previous setup force people to live in less urban places and in-town housing development was limited. Prevnting farmland from being turned into housing development might count, but as someone living "in-town", it is definitely irritating to have the surrounding countryside developed (it's one of the appeals of living here), I'd rather more was developed in and around existing areas.
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Old 08-04-2014, 08:58 AM
 
358 posts, read 360,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luzianne View Post
I seriously doubt that. I have more life experience. I have seen trends come and go. This is a trend. But even if a whole lot of people decide to move to urban areas, there are still going to be more people NOT in urban areas. Then 20 or 30 years from now, those people living like sardines in urban areas will want more space, a yard, some land, and they will move out from the core again.
Living in a city is akin to "living like sardines"? Why does urban living upset you so much? Is the fact that more people live in the suburbs important to you? Why?
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Old 08-04-2014, 09:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
Living in a city is akin to "living like sardines"? Why does urban living upset you so much? Is the fact that more people live in the suburbs important to you? Why?
Urban living doesn't upset me. But I don't think there should be a campaign to try to persuade people that they should live in urban areas and that suburban living is bad or undesirable.

Yes, living in the city is living in very close proximity to other people - thus, living like sardines. Most people want room to stretch.

I don't care how many people live in the suburbs versus urban areas. I'm just stating a fact, that more people DO live in the suburbs and that will continue to be the case.

The only thing I have a problem with is the people trying to promote urban living and acting like the suburbs are doing something wrong by existing. People moved from the core for a reason. If you want to move back to the core, be my guest. But don't tell me and others that living in the core is better and that everyone should want to do it.
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Old 08-04-2014, 09:25 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,171,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luzianne View Post
Urban living doesn't upset me. But I don't think there should be a campaign to try to persuade people that they should live in urban areas and that suburban living is bad or undesirable.

Yes, living in the city is living in very close proximity to other people - thus, living like sardines. Most people want room to stretch.

I don't care how many people live in the suburbs versus urban areas. I'm just stating a fact, that more people DO live in the suburbs and that will continue to be the case.

The only thing I have a problem with is the people trying to promote urban living and acting like the suburbs are doing something wrong by existing. People moved from the core for a reason. If you want to move back to the core, be my guest. But don't tell me and others that living in the core is better and that everyone should want to do it.

agree to all its subjective. Would be the same as someone saying that living in the burbs or in a rural area is better for another individual. There are pros and cons to living in all types of places. I have lived in all three I named and found good parts and bad to all. I do like the city best and a smaller town second but that is me and I find positives (and negatives) to all forms

I advocate smarter planning in all areas and the issues are different from environment to environment. There is a movement to the city moreso than has been seen but it is akin to someone claiming everyone is fleeing the NE to the Sunbelt or the burbs to the city of which yes there are people moving but its not a majority or even close to it.

Last edited by kidphilly; 08-04-2014 at 09:44 AM..
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Old 08-04-2014, 09:26 AM
 
1,998 posts, read 2,934,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luzianne View Post
Urban living doesn't upset me. But I don't think there should be a campaign to try to persuade people that they should live in urban areas and that suburban living is bad or undesirable.

Yes, living in the city is living in very close proximity to other people - thus, living like sardines. Most people want room to stretch.

I don't care how many people live in the suburbs versus urban areas. I'm just stating a fact, that more people DO live in the suburbs and that will continue to be the case.

The only thing I have a problem with is the people trying to promote urban living and acting like the suburbs are doing something wrong by existing. People moved from the core for a reason. If you want to move back to the core, be my guest. But don't tell me and others that living in the core is better and that everyone should want to do it.
Why is it ok for you to tell people why the suburbs are better than the city ("living like sardines") but it is not ok for other people to say why they think cities are better than suburbs?
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