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Old 08-21-2014, 05:50 PM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,347,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
You should probably look into taking an Intro to Urban Planning class, that would help with any confusing you seem to be having with urban planning.

I think you are confusing what urban planning is with urban lifestyle which isn't the same thing.
I think others are confusing the issue of what should be considered part of urban planning. The promoters of urbanism and urban planning kinda miss the obvious.

The reason to mention "lifestyle" was because that's what this thread was supposedly about - and it's in the "urban planning" forum. If you don't think functions such as school or education are relevant to either urban planning or urban lifestyle and focus only on "retail" "restaurant", and "office work" related buildings, and an apparent dislike for cars and parking lots, it just exposes the disconnect between the "urban planners" and reality.

I read the urban planning sticky and note the following:
schools fall into the zoning and land-use planning category
the lack of decent schools are (as argued by some) a contributor to urban decay
Transient density is certainly an issue for schools
transportation (public transit? transit-oriented development) is certainly an important issue for schools
Urban design (i.e., where you place the school) should be addressed
Schools certainly impact socio-economic and environmental issues regardless of whether there is a city there or not.

Seems to me schools hit many of the categories expressly deemed "on topic" for urban planning.
Too many "urban planners" are limited to arguing about what the house must look like while forgetting the purpose of the house.
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Old 08-21-2014, 07:28 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Well, yes I do think schools are on topic for the forum for the reasons mentioned. Just not necessarily will be the main focus of the forum.
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Old 08-21-2014, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
I think others are confusing the issue of what should be considered part of urban planning. The promoters of urbanism and urban planning kinda miss the obvious.

The reason to mention "lifestyle" was because that's what this thread was supposedly about - and it's in the "urban planning" forum. If you don't think functions such as school or education are relevant to either urban planning or urban lifestyle and focus only on "retail" "restaurant", and "office work" related buildings, and an apparent dislike for cars and parking lots, it just exposes the disconnect between the "urban planners" and reality.

I read the urban planning sticky and note the following:
schools fall into the zoning and land-use planning category
the lack of decent schools are (as argued by some) a contributor to urban decay
Transient density is certainly an issue for schools
transportation (public transit? transit-oriented development) is certainly an important issue for schools
Urban design (i.e., where you place the school) should be addressed
Schools certainly impact socio-economic and environmental issues regardless of whether there is a city there or not.

Seems to me schools hit many of the categories expressly deemed "on topic" for urban planning.
Too many "urban planners" are limited to arguing about what the house must look like while forgetting the purpose of the house.
Then by all means, make a thread about schools in regarding urban planning. I am sure it will generate plenty of activity.
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Old 08-21-2014, 08:58 PM
 
5,076 posts, read 8,501,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
One must to wonder what "urban planning" is other than code for a density worshipping cult. Is it any wonder the reputation is that this is about a utopia for a minority group of mostly single and childless lotus-eating, condo-dwelling hipsters?
You're living in an alternate universe.

The area I live in is mostly urban single family homes, but yes, we have an abundance of apartment dwelling hipsters not far away, and there are plenty of families with children - statistically as many births here as in the 'family friendly' suburbs. The elementary schools are full and test in the top 10% ratings wise. We picked the area to start a family and now have a baby on the way, as do a lot of other people living here.
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Old 08-21-2014, 09:17 PM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,347,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkarch View Post
You're living in an alternate universe.

The area I live in is mostly urban single family homes, but yes, we have an abundance of apartment dwelling hipsters not far away, and there are plenty of families with children - statistically as many births here as in the 'family friendly' suburbs. The elementary schools are full and test in the top 10% ratings wise. We picked the area to start a family and now have a baby on the way, as do a lot of other people living here.
What does your post have to do with "urban planning"? I was rebutting someone else's claim that schools didn't belong in "urban planning". Perhaps your post was intended for someone else. May your offspring overcome the deficiencies of his parents.
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Old 08-21-2014, 09:19 PM
 
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I'd say most urban areas are either largely in decline or too costly in good areas for medium income people. The trend I see since boomers are retiring is movement to small towns with little industrialization. Its said to be a trend increasing for the next thirteen years and involves 26% of population. That increases younger workers moving to provide services needed.Many former small towns that where dying are booming these days already from the trend.
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Old 08-21-2014, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I'd say most urban areas are either largely in decline or too costly in good areas for medium income people. The trend I see since boomers are retiring is movement to small towns with little industrialization. Its said to be a trend increasing for the next thirteen years and involves 26% of population. That increases younger workers moving to provide services needed.Many former small towns that where dying are booming these days already from the trend.
Which former small towns are you referring to?
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Old 08-21-2014, 10:27 PM
 
5,076 posts, read 8,501,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
What does your post have to do with "urban planning"? I was rebutting someone else's claim that schools didn't belong in "urban planning". Perhaps your post was intended for someone else. May your offspring overcome the deficiencies of his parents.
Wow, you didn't even understand your own post... It was quoted even. Just wow.
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Old 08-21-2014, 11:18 PM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,347,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkarch View Post
Wow, you didn't even understand your own post... It was quoted even. Just wow.
and your response was a complete non sequitur which brings us back to what did that prior post and now your most recent post have to do with urban planning? Answer: nothing, you're just trolling.
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Old 08-22-2014, 06:34 AM
 
5,682 posts, read 8,752,084 times
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Yes, absolutely, schools have a lot to do with urban settlement patterns.

So are there any cities where the planners can communicate with the school board effectively and have any influence? Maybe we should look for good examples to follow instead of pretending the problem of poor urban schools doesn't exist.
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