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Old 09-27-2014, 01:28 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059

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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
It doesn't take much to fill an urban district.
That does not jibe with "density". Nor does it jibe with the idea that the Boomer market for moving into urban areas (undefined, of course, like many things on this forum) is big. When I/we were in our 20s (different husband) we moved a lot, sometimes yearly, maybe sometimes even twice in a year. In my/our 30s, we moved less often. We bought our first house when I was 33, lived there 5 1/2 years. That was the longest either of us had lived in one place. (He was 34.) Then came a series of moves due to job loss/gain, and when I was 40 and DH 41 we bought this house and have lived here ever since. If we do as our parents did, we'll live here till we have to go to assisted living or nursing home. I do know some women "of a certain age" who are divorced/widowed who downsized, but they didn't move into downtown Denver. Most of them have jobs nearby. You young 'uns forget that most of us Boomers are still working!

Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Of course things like churches, schools, parks, day-care centers and other family-friendly facilities are examples of desirable urban amenities!
Churches? I will say that churches in the older areas of large cities tend to have an elderly membership. But then there's this one: Pastor Leads A New Brand Of Church For 'Sinners And Saints' : NPR My niece went there when she lived in Denver.

Last edited by nei; 09-28-2014 at 06:15 AM.. Reason: off topic
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Old 09-27-2014, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That does not jibe with "density". Nor does it jibe with the idea that the Boomer market for moving into urban areas (undefined, of course, like many things on this forum) is big. When I/we were in our 20s (different husband) we moved a lot, sometimes yearly, maybe sometimes even twice in a year. In my/our 30s, we moved less often. We bought our first house when I was 33, lived there 5 1/2 years. That was the longest either of us had lived in one place. (He was 34.) Then came a series of moves due to job loss/gain, and when I was 40 and DH 41 we bought this house and have lived here ever since. If we do as our parents did, we'll live here till we have to go to assisted living or nursing home. I do know some women "of a certain age" who are divorced/widowed who downsized, but they didn't move into downtown Denver. Most of them have jobs nearby. You young 'uns forget that most of us Boomers are still working!



Well, many people on this forum do not give a d*** about those particular amenities. There are only a few who are parents, and most of them are male. Even in these days, the women still make most of the child care decisions. I don't know if you've participated in any of the school threads, most will say, condescendingly, they don't consider schools important; that the only relation of schools to urban planning is siting of schools. Some don't think parks are the "best use of the land"; high density apartments would be better. Day cares? Who even gives a thought to those? Churches? I will say that churches in the older areas of large cities tend to have an elderly membership. But then there's this one: Pastor Leads A New Brand Of Church For 'Sinners And Saints' : NPR My niece went there when she lived in Denver.
I am sure you know plenty of people who live a suburban lifestyle in suburbia, but that doesn't change my point that it doesn't take much to fill an urban district.

If a district has 20K units in it, it only really needs 20K people living in that district to fill up all the available units.
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Old 09-27-2014, 02:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I am sure you know plenty of people who live a suburban lifestyle in suburbia, but that doesn't change my point that it doesn't take much to fill an urban district.

If a district has 20K units in it, it only really needs 20K people living in that district to fill up all the available units.
???
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Old 09-27-2014, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
???
I was commenting on you post, I am not sure what your confusion is. All I am saying is that it doesn't take much to fill up an urban district by empty nesters looking to downsize and young professionals looking for urban living.
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Old 09-27-2014, 02:09 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
No one is trying to force anyone to do anything.

Some of us believe that government policy has encouraged suburban living over the last several decades, and we believe that either government should stop encouraging suburban living, or also encourage urban living.

In the context of human history, suburban living has been around for a relatively short time. Before that, people lived on farms, or in cities. So it's hard to say what portion of the population prefers urban/suburban/rural living.
Yet, people were forced to leave the city, according to this post of yours (from a closed thread, or I'd multi-quote it):

Quote:
Some pro-urban folks would argue that government policies after WWII "pushed" people into the suburbs. Sure, lots of people wanted to move to the suburbs, but a lot of other people--who didn't care, or didn't want to leave the city--were "forced" to move to the suburbs, because of the problems that started to grow in the cities due to the exodus of people to the suburbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The option mentioned was a large private yard. I'm not sure how the conversation got changed afterwards. In any case, the streetviews of Bremen that I linked to mostly have private yard. Amentities has been used frequently before, it's not the most precise word, but it hasn't caused problems before nor feeling of condescension.
I probably glanced over that and rolled my eyes. Not every suburb has large yards. We've been over and over this. In the western US, small yards are common, except in a few wealthy areas.
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Old 09-27-2014, 02:11 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I was commenting on you post, I am not sure what your confusion is. All I am saying is that it doesn't take much to fill up an urban district by empty nesters looking to downsize and young professionals looking for urban living.
If that's the case, it's not necessarily true that Boomers are a big market for moving into "urban districts".
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Old 09-27-2014, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
If that's the case, it's not necessarily true that Boomers are a big market for moving into "urban districts".
Empty nesters and young professionals are a big market because they tend to be the ones that can buy into these markets or afford the higher rents.
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Old 09-27-2014, 06:23 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Empty nesters and young professionals are a big market because they tend to be the ones that can buy into these markets or afford the higher rents.
Empty nesters are not moving en masse!

We keep hearing that young professionals have all these student loans to pay off. While they might be able to afford high rents, they can't buy an expensive place b/c they don't have enough money saved for a down payment, especially if they've been paying high rent for some hip place. One usually starts with some sort of "starter" home.
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Old 09-27-2014, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Empty nesters are not moving en masse!

We keep hearing that young professionals have all these student loans to pay off. While they might be able to afford high rents, they can't buy an expensive place b/c they don't have enough money saved for a down payment, especially if they've been paying high rent for some hip place. One usually starts with some sort of "starter" home.
They don't need to move en masse, they already live in these urban districts. Last time I was in the Pearl District, buildings were full of residents.

I am sure there is an urban district in Denver that is like the Pearl District. You should find out the type of people who live in that district.
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Old 09-27-2014, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,657,858 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yet, people were forced to leave the city, according to this post of yours (from a closed thread, or I'd multi-quote it):
Notice I used quotation marks. They weren't forced to move to the suburbs by the government. Those who didn't care either way, or those who didn't want to leave the city, moved to the suburbs due to their unwillingness or inability to deal with the problems caused by others moving to the suburbs. If you're into conspiracy theories, (I know you're not, and neither am I) one might argue that the government purposefully promoted suburbia to cause these problems, and thus forcing people to the suburbs. But, I believe the deterioration of US cities was simply an unintended consequence of pro-suburban policies, and no one was forced to do anything.
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