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Old 09-27-2014, 08:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059

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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
They don't need to move en masse, they already live in these urban districts. Last time I was in the Pearl District, buildings were full of residents.

I am sure there is an urban district in Denver that is like the Pearl District. You should find out the type of people who live in that district.
You keep jumping back and forth between Boomers being a "market" and saying they already live in the city. See below. The Boomers I know are staying put or downsizing in their communities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That isn't true, boomers that are empty nesters area big market for buying in urban areas. Portland's Pearl District is full of these types of people.
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Old 09-27-2014, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You keep jumping back and forth between Boomers being a "market" and saying they already live in the city. See below. The Boomers I know are staying put or downsizing in their communities.
I didn't know you knew all the boomers, I guess that means urban districts in Denver are all ghost towns because no one lives in them because they all stayed put in suburbia.

Now it seems you are just arguing for the sake of arguing.
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Old 09-27-2014, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,657,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
It doesn't take much to fill an urban district.
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Empty nesters and young professionals are a big market because they tend to be the ones that can buy into these markets or afford the higher rents.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Empty nesters are not moving en masse!

We keep hearing that young professionals have all these student loans to pay off. While they might be able to afford high rents, they can't buy an expensive place b/c they don't have enough money saved for a down payment, especially if they've been paying high rent for some hip place. One usually starts with some sort of "starter" home.
These things don't contradict each other. More than once, I've seen it stated that about 2% of an area's population wants to live downtown. (after a quick Google search, I found this article that makes such a reference: Business North Carolina - Skyline drive) 2% of a population is hardly "en masse." Yet, those numbers can still be quite large. Heck, even in Youngstown, that would mean that our downtown could support 10,000+ people; that's more than Columbus currently has living downtown!
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Old 09-27-2014, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,761,847 times
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I think it could be more than 2%. It's around 3% in Toronto and seems to be heading towards 4-5%. For New York City it might be around 5% if you look at Manhattan (excluding Harlem and neighbourhoods to the north) and clearly there's demand for much more. So in cities that have healthier downtowns, there's demand for more, it seems like the more people live there, the more want to join them.
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Old 09-27-2014, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,657,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
I think it could be more than 2%. It's around 3% in Toronto and seems to be heading towards 4-5%. For New York City it might be around 5% if you look at Manhattan (excluding Harlem and neighbourhoods to the north) and clearly there's demand for much more. So in cities that have healthier downtowns, there's demand for more, it seems like the more people live there, the more want to join them.
Sure, it could be more than 2%. And, maybe that number has increased over time? I first heard 2% in relation to downtown Cleveland, over 15 years ago. I think it's just one "rule of thumb" predictor for US cities.
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Old 09-27-2014, 09:30 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I didn't know you knew all the boomers, I guess that means urban districts in Denver are all ghost towns because no one lives in them because they all stayed put in suburbia.

Now it seems you are just arguing for the sake of arguing.
I DO know every Boomers in the US! Why does that surprise you? You know all of them. You know they're a "market". Just what I've always wanted to be a part of, a market.

Note that there are fewer people over 65 in Denver than the rest of Colorado. Denver County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Note that I never said I know every Boomer. I was discussing the ones I know.
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Old 09-27-2014, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I DO know every Boomers in the US! Why does that surprise you? You know all of them. You know they're a "market". Just what I've always wanted to be a part of, a market.

Note that there are fewer people over 65 in Denver than the rest of Colorado. Denver County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Note that I never said I know every Boomer. I was discussing the ones I know.
10% is 64K people over 65 living in Denver. There is more than enough to fill a hip urban district in Denver. Combine that with the number of young professionals that can afford high rents or buy an urban condo, then you have got a full urban district.

Does that make more sense to you or do you wish to continue to pretend like these urban districts are ghost towns that no one lives in?
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Old 09-27-2014, 11:25 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
10% is 64K people over 65 living in Denver. There is more than enough to fill a hip urban district in Denver. Combine that with the number of young professionals that can afford high rents or buy an urban condo, then you have got a full urban district.

Does that make more sense to you or do you wish to continue to pretend like these urban districts are ghost towns that no one lives in?
Now goddammit, I never said that! Stop putting words in my mouth! And knock off the childish emoticoms, too. What I said, for the record, several times, is that the Boomers I know who have downsized have stayed in their own area.

Some of these 64K people over 65 are living in senior apartments, assisted living centers and nursing homes, too. That's a real hip way to live, trust me.

What's with these young professionals who can afford high rents? On the Denver forum, people complain about the rent all the time. And don't come at me with "it's not all the time". I'm sick of the nit-picking that happens on this forum about people's word choices; I'm tired of having to figure out how to say something so someone won't pick an argument saying "it's not all the time; there are only 10 threads on the Denver main page about high rents", yada, yada. It's a figure of speech. And WHO are these young professionals who can afford to buy expensive condos. From reading CD, one would think they're all living in their parents' basements!
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Old 09-28-2014, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Now goddammit, I never said that! Stop putting words in my mouth! And knock off the childish emoticoms, too. What I said, for the record, several times, is that the Boomers I know who have downsized have stayed in their own area.

Some of these 64K people over 65 are living in senior apartments, assisted living centers and nursing homes, too. That's a real hip way to live, trust me.

What's with these young professionals who can afford high rents? On the Denver forum, people complain about the rent all the time. And don't come at me with "it's not all the time". I'm sick of the nit-picking that happens on this forum about people's word choices; I'm tired of having to figure out how to say something so someone won't pick an argument saying "it's not all the time; there are only 10 threads on the Denver main page about high rents", yada, yada. It's a figure of speech. And WHO are these young professionals who can afford to buy expensive condos. From reading CD, one would think they're all living in their parents' basements!
So we now know people live in these urban districts, why is it so hard for you to accept the fact that people do actually live in them? Not everyone over 65 lives in suburbia, and I am sure everyone you know over 65 lives in suburbia because you yourself live in suburbia, therefore the people you probably befriend also lives in suburbia.

I have proven my point that it doesn't take much to fill an urban district, and it is realistic to believe that many empty nesters and young professionals are the ones renting and owning these units.

What exactly with that do you disagree with and why?
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Old 09-28-2014, 06:14 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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This thread reads as 10 pages of people trying to find ways to argue with each other and wind each other up. I thought we were talking about German cities, what happened?!

And why would high rents equal less interest in cities? Usually high rents signify demand outstripping supply.
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