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Old 09-04-2014, 12:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
A few of my local millennial cohorts live in these "cool" walkable neighborhoods, but most do not. In fact a bunch are now married, perhaps on their first or second child. The things that appealed to them when they were right out of college (21-23) no longer hold much sway now that they are settling down. Suburban or rural living appeals to them most, as they could not imagine raising kids in a city apartment (as opposed to a suburban townhome or exurban farm house). Almost all own a car but bicycling, weather-permitting, has greatly increased in popularity.

I think people tend to get their idea of millenials from TV shows like Girls, but most of us are neither that degenerate nor sophisticated nor urbane.
Well, there's this meme that milennials want utter urbanity. Clearly, given the popularity of SF and NYC, there's a certain draw. For most milennials, from my perspective, the situation is nuanced and tends to look more like a streetcar suburb (urban-lite) than either downtowns or true suburbs; walkable, near places, parks, and paths, possibly car-agnostic, but still offers SFHs.
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Old 09-06-2014, 03:28 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
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I think millenials may just naturally have the evolutionary drive to be near eachother because they are usually the ones most secluded from others via technology.
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Old 09-07-2014, 07:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Opin_Yunated View Post
Toronto is nice but thank goodness I live across the border. No way in hell I'd pay $1,000+ for rent. You are renting. Rent is supposed to be as cheap as humanely possible to bank cash since there is no equity.

If possible, try to keep rent + utilities under 20% of income. For $50,000 / year, that is $800-$850 / month. Get a few roommates and stack money to the ceiling. That is why most millenials are staying home; we have too much in student loans to pay rent that high.
Financially prudent post. When we were in college, my wife and I were paying 760 to 840 / month for rent. It was an over priced area.

We bought a large house in a vastly better area after we were through college and had substantially more income. Interest, taxes, and insurance added up to about 850/month. (plus 350 towards equity)
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Old 09-07-2014, 07:58 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Opin_Yunated View Post
Toronto is nice but thank goodness I live across the border. No way in hell I'd pay $1,000+ for rent. You are renting. Rent is supposed to be as cheap as humanely possible to bank cash since there is no equity.
Huh? Rent prices in Toronto are cheaper than comparable northern US cities, say Chicago or Boston. I agree spending large sums on rent isn't the best idea financially.

Quote:
Financially prudent post. When we were in college, my wife and I were paying 760 to 840 / month for rent. It was an over priced area.

We bought a large house in a vastly better area after we were through college and had substantially more income. Interest, taxes, and insurance added up to about 850/month. (plus 350 towards equity)
What were you renting? Your housing costs sound cheap to me.
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Old 09-07-2014, 08:05 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 42,008,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
A few of my local millennial cohorts live in these "cool" walkable neighborhoods, but most do not. In fact a bunch are now married, perhaps on their first or second child. The things that appealed to them when they were right out of college (21-23) no longer hold much sway now that they are settling down. Suburban or rural living appeals to them most, as they could not imagine raising kids in a city apartment (as opposed to a suburban townhome or exurban farm house). Almost all own a car but bicycling, weather-permitting, has greatly increased in popularity.

I think people tend to get their idea of millenials from TV shows like Girls, but most of us are neither that degenerate nor sophisticated nor urbane.
Probably most I know don't, although they may not have thought about it that hard yet. But most haven't had kids yet even if many are in their late 20s, so it's a moot issue. Can't think of too many that moved to truly rural areas, either. I'd say about half of people I knew in h.s. / college moved to big cities, usually walkable areas.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:32 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
Well, there's this meme that milennials want utter urbanity. Clearly, given the popularity of SF and NYC, there's a certain draw. For most milennials, from my perspective, the situation is nuanced and tends to look more like a streetcar suburb (urban-lite) than either downtowns or true suburbs; walkable, near places, parks, and paths, possibly car-agnostic, but still offers SFHs.
It may come as some surprise to you millennials, but SF and NYC have long been popular with young people, even in my parents' day in the same age group (1940s-50s).

My daughter recently told me she likes her home b/c it's on the edge of the Denver metro, in the southern suburbs. I told her that's why I have always liked about where we live, on the northern edge. Her 'hood has all the bold, as does mine.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:54 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It may come as some surprise to you millennials, but SF and NYC have long been popular with young people, even in my parents' day in the same age group (1940s-50s).
Darkeconomist didn't say that it hadn't been, though. And no, it's not a surprise, however, it does seem that NYC is more popular among young people than previously. I don't think it was as common for NYC suburbanites to move to NYC post-college as now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
Well, there's this meme that milennials want utter urbanity. Clearly, given the popularity of SF and NYC, there's a certain draw. For most milennials, from my perspective, the situation is nuanced and tends to look more like a streetcar suburb (urban-lite) than either downtowns or true suburbs; walkable, near places, parks, and paths, possibly car-agnostic, but still offers SFHs.
From my perspective, that's not the case. People I know my age either go for walkable big city "utter urbanity" or traditional suburb (usually similar to wherever they grew up). The in between hasn't seen much interest in people moving, at least for those moving. Hmm. Well, I can think of a few that match what you're describing.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:59 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Darkeconomist didn't say that it hadn't been, though. And no, it's not a surprise, however, it does seem that NYC is more popular among young people than previously. I don't think it was as common for NYC suburbanites to move to NYC post-college as now.



From my perspective, that's not the case. People I know my age either go for walkable big city "utter urbanity" or traditional suburb (usually similar to wherever they grew up). The in between hasn't seen much interest in people moving, at least for those moving.
You're not confused, you're being argumentative, and I say that in a nice way! Here's the relevant fragment of darkeconomist's post:
Quote:
Well, there's this meme that milennials want utter urbanity. Clearly, given the popularity of SF and NYC, there's a certain draw.
Now I interpreted this to mean "that's what millennials want". I'm pointing out it's what 20 somethings wanted in 1945, too! When the war ended, and my mom got out of the Army, where she'd been a nurse, she and her friend went to Boston to further their educations. Now that's Boston, not NYC, but it was still "the city". My mom was a farm girl from Wisconsin. Moving to "the city" was popular in the 1970s as well. I remember when we were all graduating from nursing school. Those of us who were 'unattached' to a certain city for various reasons (partners, strong family ties, whatever) talked of where we would go,and a certain number went to NYC and particularly SF. It was VERY popular in the 70s, trust me.
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Old 09-07-2014, 10:16 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 42,008,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You're not confused, you're being argumentative, and I say that in a nice way! Here's the relevant fragment of darkeconomist's post: Now I interpreted this to mean "that's what millennials want". I'm pointing out it's what 20 somethings wanted in 1945, too! And in 1975 as well. I remember when we were all graduating from nursing school. Those of us who were 'unattached' to a certain city for various reasons (partners, strong family ties, whatever) talked of where we would go,and a certain number went to NYC and particularly SF. It was VERY popular in the 70s, trust me.
Yes, I read his post. The confusion was that it was a bit of a non-sequitur. I interpreted that, too, I was just pointing out he didn't say about previous generations. But I see what you were point is now. anyhow...

I know NYC was always a common choice, but it wasn't really the choice of those "unattached to a certain city" I'm looking through the perspective of NYC suburbanites.
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Old 09-08-2014, 03:30 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,006,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It may come as some surprise to you millennials, but SF and NYC have long been popular with young people, even in my parents' day in the same age group (1940s-50s).

My daughter recently told me she likes her home b/c it's on the edge of the Denver metro, in the southern suburbs. I told her that's why I have always liked about where we live, on the northern edge. Her 'hood has all the bold, as does mine.
I was only suggesting that the meme is wrapped around some truth. That it has also been the case for several generations is an aside; the meme is specifically in regards to the preferences of one (very large and economy-shaping) generation.
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