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Old 08-07-2014, 09:38 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
I know those are examples of "cookie-cutter" housing where the houses look all the same, but I wasn't aware they were by the same developer. Interesting.
Depends on the rowhouse development. The ones I described in my Ridgewood, NY link. Other times, a developer made maybe half a block and the developer switched quickly. Sometimes the size and style on a rowhouse block isn't consistent. This Brooklyn block certainly doesn't appear to be tract homes but a rather random collection:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Green...02.37,,0,-8.32
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Old 08-11-2014, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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OP, you're trying to fit your preconceived notions into a tidy little pigeonhole. Real life isn't that way.

The pre-WWII neighborhoods I've lived in have all been tract homes - all built at once, or around the same time.

My parents' 1955 house, on the other hand, and all the houses in their neighborhood, were built by individual owners.
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Old 08-11-2014, 09:15 PM
 
Location: The City
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Money (builders making things more profitable, basically nearly assembly line construction) and can't believe that no one has mentioned, affordable cars and the Gov't starting to fund highways (partially in response to defense needs coming out of WWII) a perfect storm in a sense that was a shift in the development stock type

But not truly a new concept, take my city for example - rowhouses (sorry Kat just saw you last post after I wrote the rowhouse thing and not trying to steal your thunder) were build large scale (albeit smaller tracts) for decades, maybe even a century plus prior to this shift)
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Old 08-12-2014, 11:06 PM
 
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It was a slow transition over decades, not an overnight shift. Streetcar suburbs emerged in the late 19th century, generally the suburban buyer bought a vacant lot and built what they wanted, but social pressures and the limitations of lots encouraged similarity of style, setback and orientation. Examples of "mass-produced" housing were often factory towns or worker housing associated with a particular plant or facility, the best known of which is probably Pullman, Illinois.

Early 20th century streetcar suburbs slowly transitioned from providing an unimproved lot to more modern, hygienic setups with paved roads, plumbing, sewer connections, and spec-built homes. Sometimes the developer had standard plans for a purchaser to choose from, or they built the homes in advance to one of several common plans.

During the Great Depression, there were lots of experiments with different methods of neighborhood planning, some based on a more communal metaphor, with shared kitchen and childcare facilities, while others were oriented toward single-family homes. During the same era, a lot of architects and city planners were developing ideas about large-scale mass-produced suburbs to reduce costs, primarily built around the automobile and public highways and roads instead of streetcars.

After the war, high demand and lots of money, plus all sorts of incentives to promote greenfield development like FHA loans, the GI Bill and redlining, all that experimentation, theorizing and social engineering got put to use building the postwar American suburb. In the postwar spirit of anti-communism, the more "communal" experiments were cast aside in favor of the single-family suburban home where most of us grew up.
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Old 08-13-2014, 12:29 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^Oh, for Pity's Sake! We have posted many different pictures of neighborhoods from the 1920s with identical houses, and you get off on this communism thing.

During the depression, little home building was going on, communal or otherwise. Little building was going on during WW II d/t the resources going towards the war effort. After the war, there was a pent up demand of about 15 years, and yes, the veterans did get their VA loans. This was a new approach. After the Civil War, my great-grandfather got 40 acres to homestead. I'm posting this to show it was not uncommon to reward the veterans with some form of affordable housing.
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Old 08-13-2014, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Even in neighborhoods built before WWII you can find houses that are identical or share an lot of elements in the same neighborhood built at the same time.
I've noticed that in Denver. If you look closely in neighborhoods where the houses were built in the late 1800s, you'll notice repeats. Often, there will be 2 to 4 of the same house, but the ornamentation/brick is different on each house. But they're the same size with windows in the same place, so the same floorplan. There must have been builders that did that type of development... just bought a couple or few lots, and built the same house. They just tweaked them a little to look different.
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Old 08-13-2014, 02:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I've noticed that in Denver. If you look closely in neighborhoods where the houses were built in the late 1800s, you'll notice repeats. Often, there will be 2 to 4 of the same house, but the ornamentation/brick is different on each house. But they're the same size with windows in the same place, so the same floorplan. There must have been builders that did that type of development... just bought a couple or few lots, and built the same house. They just tweaked them a little to look different.
Yes, Denver. Most bungalows have the exact same floor plan, ditto some of those Tudor-type houses on Federal Blvd. Many of them were built in the 1920s.
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Old 08-13-2014, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yes, Denver. Most bungalows have the exact same floor plan, ditto some of those Tudor-type houses on Federal Blvd. Many of them were built in the 1920s.
I've been in many old houses in the City Park/Cap Hill neighborhoods and the floorplans are very similar/predictable. So many "Four Squares".
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Old 08-13-2014, 02:23 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I've been in many old houses in the City Park/Cap Hill neighborhoods and the floorplans are very similar/predictable. So many "Four Squares".
Oh, yes. When I was a visiting nurse, I never had to ask where the bathroom was in these houses. Always in the same place.
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Old 08-13-2014, 02:39 PM
 
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Ever look at homes built after WII for returning GI and families; pure tract homes
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