U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-13-2014, 04:48 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,856,857 times
Reputation: 1439

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I've noticed that in Denver. If you look closely in neighborhoods where the houses were built in the late 1800s, you'll notice repeats. Often, there will be 2 to 4 of the same house, but the ornamentation/brick is different on each house. But they're the same size with windows in the same place, so the same floorplan. There must have been builders that did that type of development... just bought a couple or few lots, and built the same house. They just tweaked them a little to look different.
I lived in an house sorta like that. It and the one next door were more or less the same except the rooms where on the opposite side on the other house and the facade of the building different but otherwise the same sorta building.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-13-2014, 08:42 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,193,007 times
Reputation: 3351
The end of WWII was a milestone in many ways for the housing industry. As already pointed out, very few homes were built from the Recession thru the end of the war, so there was lots of unmet demand. This was increased by the huge number of soldiers returning from the war wanting to start a family.

US manufacturing was ramped up for the war and most of the other industrial nations had much of their manufacturing infrastructure destroyed in the war, so we were the world's manufacturing center in the post war era and that provided near full employment at decent wages.

During the war we converted auto factories to fighter plane and tank factories virtually over night.
Huge military facilities were built in record time. The Remington Arms Factory in Colorado (now the Denver Federal Center) was built in under a year and was one of the largest facilities in the world.
Because of the demands of the war we figured out how to do big projects both quickly and affordably.
Large scale military housing was built quickly using assembly line production.

After the war this expertise and organizational mindset was used to met the huge demand for consumer products and housing. Prior to the war, home construction was typically done by small companies or individuals that had one crew build the house from foundation to finish, with only plumbers and electricians being outside contractors. Post war "tract" home production had 10 to 15 different crews working on a house, each doing a specialized part of the job.

The huge demand justified builders doing a hundred homes at a time instead of one to five. Government loans keep the sales flowing so production was ramped up to meet demand.
With better organization and mass production techniques production time went from 9 to 12 months
down to two to three months.

Another consequence of the war was that many young men and women that had never been more than a hundred miles from home travelled to military bases in Texas, Colorado, Arizona and California.
After the war, instead of returning to their home towns, which were often rust belt cities devastated by the recession, they moved west. The post war years were boom times for many sunbelt cities that had room for major growth. Combined with the highway building of the later 1950s, we became a much more mobile country, which required new homes, which big corporations and banks were more than willing to provide.

None of the above discounts the large number of identical rowhomes and bungalows that were built prior to the war. Many early street car developments would be examples of early tract development, but the combination of big demand, full employment, big business and assembly line production created a new business model for home development. Nor were these changes all at the same time through out the country. Many existing cities had little room for massive development.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2014, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,653,336 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
The end of WWII was a milestone in many ways for the housing industry. As already pointed out, very few homes were built from the Recession thru the end of the war, so there was lots of unmet demand. This was increased by the huge number of soldiers returning from the war wanting to start a family.

US manufacturing was ramped up for the war and most of the other industrial nations had much of their manufacturing infrastructure destroyed in the war, so we were the world's manufacturing center in the post war era and that provided near full employment at decent wages.

During the war we converted auto factories to fighter plane and tank factories virtually over night.
Huge military facilities were built in record time. The Remington Arms Factory in Colorado (now the Denver Federal Center) was built in under a year and was one of the largest facilities in the world.
Because of the demands of the war we figured out how to do big projects both quickly and affordably.
Large scale military housing was built quickly using assembly line production.

After the war this expertise and organizational mindset was used to met the huge demand for consumer products and housing. Prior to the war, home construction was typically done by small companies or individuals that had one crew build the house from foundation to finish, with only plumbers and electricians being outside contractors. Post war "tract" home production had 10 to 15 different crews working on a house, each doing a specialized part of the job.

The huge demand justified builders doing a hundred homes at a time instead of one to five. Government loans keep the sales flowing so production was ramped up to meet demand.
With better organization and mass production techniques production time went from 9 to 12 months
down to two to three months.

Another consequence of the war was that many young men and women that had never been more than a hundred miles from home travelled to military bases in Texas, Colorado, Arizona and California.
After the war, instead of returning to their home towns, which were often rust belt cities devastated by the recession, they moved west. The post war years were boom times for many sunbelt cities that had room for major growth. Combined with the highway building of the later 1950s, we became a much more mobile country, which required new homes, which big corporations and banks were more than willing to provide.

None of the above discounts the large number of identical rowhomes and bungalows that were built prior to the war. Many early street car developments would be examples of early tract development, but the combination of big demand, full employment, big business and assembly line production created a new business model for home development. Nor were these changes all at the same time through out the country. Many existing cities had little room for massive development.
During, and after WWII, the rust belt cities were in their prime. They had their own rapid suburban expansion. It wasn't until the 70s and 80s that jobs started moving away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2014, 06:22 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,193,007 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
During, and after WWII, the rust belt cities were in their prime. They had their own rapid suburban expansion. It wasn't until the 70s and 80s that jobs started moving away.
True, but many soldiers left home before the manufacturing jobs from the war and their memories were a city in the recession. They (including my dad) decided to relocate to locations they had seen during their service. Also as manufacturing ramped up post war, many new factories were built in the sunbelt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2014, 07:10 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,983 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
During, and after WWII, the rust belt cities were in their prime. They had their own rapid suburban expansion. It wasn't until the 70s and 80s that jobs started moving away.
True dat! The Pittsburgh metro population grew about 50% between 1950 and 1960, far greater than the US population growth.
Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States - Peakbagger.com
http://geography.about.com/od/obtain...ta/a/uspop.htm
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2014, 10:58 AM
 
Location: City of the Angels
2,222 posts, read 1,663,821 times
Reputation: 5376
Great post !
The history of people and their dwellings is an extremely interesting topic.
The future of housing as the availability of land becomes scarce and the prices of property becomes astronomical is toward vertical subdivisions called Highrise Condominiums.
I'm sure that few people on this board would want to live in these bird cages but unfortunately, our grandchildren will probably be financially forced to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top