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Old 08-20-2014, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,538,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
I'm talking about cities that don't already have a rapid transit subway system. Cities that already have subway systems are excluded from this discussion. Even cities that have light rail subway systems like Seattle are excluded unless they are planning on building a rapid transit subway system.
Then I think your answer might be no city because a city in the US that doesn't already have a rapid transit subway system in place probably isn't ever going to build one. Light rail has proven to be the cheaper alternative to rapid transit systems like you would find in NYC, Boston, Chicago, and Philly.

Cities that currently have some form of subway system in place now, like Cleveland and St Louis, might one day see those subway systems expanded.

But a brand new subway system, I just don't see any city wanting to take on that large of a financial risk if they don't already have a usable rail system in place already.
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:38 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,195,701 times
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Lots of political discussions/debates in Indianapolis about light rail or commuter rail from the northern suburbs. But not a subway system.
Biggest problem other than $$s, is that most downtown workers do not face long commutes or delays and parking is easy and cheap.
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Old 08-20-2014, 12:16 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,267,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post

Imagine the racket those heavy rail trains are making as they pass overhead an urban neighborhood. Must be deafening for the residents and shops living under or near it.
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Old 08-20-2014, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,263,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I don't mind it one bit. In fact, I kind of dig it. Maybe I'm just used to it? I don't really care where it runs...I just want it to be there. And if elevated rail is an affordable alternative, I don't have much of an issue running it down most streets.
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Old 08-20-2014, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Southwest Minneapolis
493 posts, read 575,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Lots of political discussions/debates in Indianapolis about light rail or commuter rail from the northern suburbs. But not a subway system.
Biggest problem other than $$s, is that most downtown workers do not face long commutes or delays and parking is easy and cheap.
It seems a pretty safe bet that one of Indy, (as mentioned above) Columbus, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Kansas City, San Antonio, Louisville or Raleigh? I'm not sure if I missed any. As far as which will have the money and political will at the same time first? No idea.
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Old 08-20-2014, 03:42 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,248 posts, read 19,189,929 times
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Fort Worth HAD a subway. I believe we even still have part of the tunnel. But sadly, that was shut down last decade.





Maybe it'll be brought back, but this city has other public transportation issues to deal with, first...
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Old 08-20-2014, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,472,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
Fort Worth HAD a subway. I believe we even still have part of the tunnel. But sadly, that was shut down last decade.





Maybe it'll be brought back, but this city has other public transportation issues to deal with, first...
How many underground stations did it have?
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Old 08-20-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,515,215 times
Reputation: 15955
You're not likely to see any further subway/heavy rail development, because the conditions that encouraged it in the older, more congested cities (Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago) no longer exist. I do believe you'll see further development of light rail and commuter trains, however.

I believe the biggest question right now is whether "exurban" rail systems extending further out from the central cities, can be developed.
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Old 08-20-2014, 04:42 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,176,306 times
Reputation: 7739
How fast can light rail go and realistically how many cars can be in a train. It seems this is morte the wave of the future and seems scale the current development pattern better.

Light rail can work with capacity - the green lines in Boston have higher ridership per mile than many subways as an example

I have a idea - sort of useless but anyway to convert some of the RR lines in Philly to light rail build off the already existing tunnels that exist adding more stations closer in

Overhead lines seem to add more flexibility to serve more areas including with traffic, plus believe require less spacing between trains

https://mapsengine.google.com/map/ed...o.k2bFHU6_UMcc
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Old 08-20-2014, 04:51 PM
 
5,076 posts, read 8,515,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Honolulu though it's elevated so maybe doesn't count. Seattle's will opened earlier, though they already have a system.
I'd hesitate to call one line running from the airport to downtown a "system". More like "Seattle has A light rail" and "A monorail". The light rail line might have just as easily ended up like the monorail, but fortunately it looks like the second line is going to actually reach completion. Hard to predict whether this will lead to more than one stretch being built. I certainly hope it does, but the folks over in the eastern part of the county really seem to like sitting in their cars for several hours a day so they may vote against it.
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