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Old 08-21-2014, 05:48 PM
 
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If you could tear down any city or town or find a new undeveloped location, how would you build that town and what would you put in it?
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Old 08-21-2014, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Would the city be built all at once or more slowly over several decades? Are we assuming some sort of industry or trade route for the economic basis?
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Old 08-21-2014, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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I do this every time whenever I start a new city on Simcity4.
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Old 08-21-2014, 10:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
Would the city be built all at once or more slowly over several decades? Are we assuming some sort of industry or trade route for the economic basis?
whatever you like
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Old 08-22-2014, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,958 posts, read 3,817,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
If you could tear down any city or town or find a new undeveloped location, how would you build that town and what would you put in it?
Fantastic question! I think every city planner occasionally fantasizes about what certain cities "could have been" and would love to reshape a city in their desired way.

For me, I would tear down all the development in Southern California and redesign the area to accommodate public transit and walking/biking. If there is any climate in the US that a biking-centric metropolis should be located in, it's SoCal. I would also focus development around public transit and make certain that every residential area is well connected to a means of mass transit. As it stands today, SoCal allowed lots of suburban development that really doesn't make mass transit possible since most people in these types of suburbs are inconvenienced to walk anywhere.

As for Seattle... I would have never chosen Seattle's current geographic location for a city at all. If you google "Olympic Rain Shadow", you'll discover that 3 hours west of Seattle is an area at the foot of the Olympic Mountains that experiences a quarter of the rainfall that Seattle experiences. The cities in this area are called Port Angeles and Sequim. This area enjoys a lot more sunshine and would have had much more enjoyable winter months. Again, I would focus on accessibility to rapid transit.
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Old 08-22-2014, 01:12 AM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,888,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Fantastic question! I think every city planner occasionally fantasizes about what certain cities "could have been" and would love to reshape a city in their desired way.

For me, I would tear down all the development in Southern California and redesign the area to accommodate public transit and walking/biking. If there is any climate in the US that a biking-centric metropolis should be located in, it's SoCal. I would also focus development around public transit and make certain that every residential area is well connected to a means of mass transit. As it stands today, SoCal allowed lots of suburban development that really doesn't make mass transit possible since most people in these types of suburbs are inconvenienced to walk anywhere.

As for Seattle... I would have never chosen Seattle's current geographic location for a city at all. If you google "Olympic Rain Shadow", you'll discover that 3 hours west of Seattle is an area at the foot of the Olympic Mountains that experiences a quarter of the rainfall that Seattle experiences. The cities in this area are called Port Angeles and Sequim. This area enjoys a lot more sunshine and would have had much more enjoyable winter months. Again, I would focus on accessibility to rapid transit.
what about the fact that so cal used to be prime land for farming? if so cal was re-did, and was nicer, then prices would be way higher than they r now.
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Old 08-23-2014, 11:15 PM
 
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A streetcar would be a key component of course! There would be a greenbelt around the town to stop sprawl and there would be no zoning only form based codes encouraging high density mixed use.
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Old 08-24-2014, 08:44 PM
 
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Honestly, NYC as it pretty much already is with a few changes around the edges:

1) Invest even more in the subway system and commuter trains (in terms of train quality, service frequency, cleanliness, coverage area, you name it); build some massive parking structures on some edge stations and expand the road network near and leading to them so people can live in the suburbs and easily get to and onto the public transit system into the city without the congestion and headache of having to drive in.

2) Reduce restrictions on building to get density even higher in core areas of Manhattan and Brooklyn and make the city more affordable.

3) Clear out the projects and afterward make them market-rate housing to reduce overall rents by introducing a massive number of units onto the market, reduce crime by getting a lot of the criminals out of the city, make the public schools better so middle-class families don't flee for the suburbs when their kids get older, and reduce spending/taxation - given the new lower outlay level you could in large part fund the city government off of the rents from those apartments without the need for most of the current income and property taxes.

tl;dr - NYC but even denser with an even better public transit system integrated more tightly with the suburbs and without the current large amounts of public housing, high tax burden, and sky-high market rents.
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Old 08-26-2014, 01:07 PM
 
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Set up a clear and brief framework for development and a gridded layout, reserve land for trails which cut across the city, then let it run. I believe: the market can work when it is maximally inclusive of costs; in the use of government to fill in the gaps where the market isn't efficient (unless the government is worse at it); in keeping people in close proximity to usable nature (such as OSPs and greenways).

I believe UP faces two big systemic problems which I would try to avoid: rigidity of plans--cities try too hard to define what gets built and make it too hard to change when things don't work out--and a loss of focus on the human scale. We have often built for a specific moment in history--the age of the car, for one example--then we make it difficult to pivot away from that moment when times change.
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Old 08-26-2014, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,503,405 times
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I'd make it an "open city", with no interference with business activity of any kind, and no direct taxation on any form of entrepreneurship.

The rest would take care of itself.
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