U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-25-2014, 08:06 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
There is another primary difference. Conventional enclosed malls or strip malls tend to be located close to population centers. In contrast outlet malls tend to be located where it's convenient for the retailer from a supply-chain standpoint. Thus they tend to be in areas more remote from population, but convenient to freight lines. Prices can be low in part because the last element of the distribution chain is outsourced to the consumer.

I don't think the future of outlet malls is particularly bright. People shop at them almost entirely for the perceived low prices, given the actual shopping experience is very inconvenient and pretty no-frills. Over time I expect online retail to replace nearly the entire market. Some standalone "showcase" factory outlets, like Ethan Allen, Yankee Candle, etc, will survive as tourist draws however.
"Remote"? Out here in CO, there are some outlet malls at the ends of the metro area, e.g. Loveland and Castle Rock, with Loveland arguably outside the metro, but not *that* far. But they're not out in "the middle of nowhere". Yankee Candle? Seriously? They don't really carry high-priced merchandise. They've been around a long time, despite your prediction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-25-2014, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,941,006 times
Reputation: 10542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"Remote"? Out here in CO, there are some outlet malls at the ends of the metro area, e.g. Loveland and Castle Rock, with Loveland arguably outside the metro, but not *that* far. But they're not out in "the middle of nowhere". Yankee Candle? Seriously? They don't really carry high-priced merchandise. They've been around a long time, despite your prediction.
The average shopper to an outlet mall travels 54 minutes to get there (each way). I'd call that pretty remote for shopping, but that's just me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 08:40 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Here's the direct quote from Wiki: The average reported distance to outlet malls was given between 30 and 80 miles (one way), with a travel time of 54 minutes.[1]
That really is quite the spread, no?

Yeah, it's just you, reasonable you, not some whack like a suburbanite. I mean, we're all driving 30 miles to buy a carton of milk five times a week, no?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: NYC
12,938 posts, read 8,766,025 times
Reputation: 14221
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Just a quick thought I had about outlet malls. Do you think they have the same negative effect on downtowns like enclosed malls do? Most outlet malls I know are tourist destinations. The jobs created by outlet malls are for mostly high schooler kids needing work. Any thoughts?

In general they are bad just like Walmarts are bad because you have people that would rather go there even if the prices are only 1% cheaper.

Mom & pop stores are better for the area because they depend on other local businesses for services which helps the business development in the community.

Walmarts and Outlet Malls destroys business communities because they do nothing but kill businesses in a community and they don't depend on local businesses as much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 12:35 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
In general they are bad just like Walmarts are bad because you have people that would rather go there even if the prices are only 1% cheaper.

Mom & pop stores are better for the area because they depend on other local businesses for services which helps the business development in the community.

Walmarts and Outlet Malls destroys business communities because they do nothing but kill businesses in a community and they don't depend on local businesses as much.
Here is a post about Walmart from another forum:

Quote:
Originally Posted by BradPiff View Post
In a world in which we have endless war, pollution, starvation, lack of clean water, etc. I cant be mad at wal mart. They have low prices and hire/promote black people. What else can I ask for?

Those mom and pop stores in my old neighborhood where I grew up pre walmart never hired black kids.
This is the first I've seen a beef with outlet malls in particular. What's next for "urbanists" to complain about?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,072 posts, read 16,098,416 times
Reputation: 12647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Here's the direct quote from Wiki: The average reported distance to outlet malls was given between 30 and 80 miles (one way), with a travel time of 54 minutes.[1]
That really is quite the spread, no?

Yeah, it's just you, reasonable you, not some whack like a suburbanite. I mean, we're all driving 30 miles to buy a carton of milk five times a week, no?
We should be. Tax chattel suburbanites should do all their shopping in the city. They shouldn't live in the city because that drives up real estate prices and blah blah gentrification, but their dollars belong to the city. Of course, how they should get to their jobs (which should be in the city) and to buy their carton of milk and rent a movie so they have something to do while they sit around at home which is all they do anyway, is a bit of a mystery. Too much money is spent so suburbanites can get to their jobs and buy their cartons of milk and rent their movies. Maybe they should just levitate there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 12:56 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 42,008,719 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Here's the direct quote from Wiki: The average reported distance to outlet malls was given between 30 and 80 miles (one way), with a travel time of 54 minutes.[1]
That really is quite the spread, no?
It is a spread. But the average is 54 minutes. Longer than most go to a shopping mall. The outlet malls I'm familiar with are at the edge of a metro. The one on Long Island is about as far from my parent's house as Manhattan (they're 38 miles away). The one difference might be that the end of the Denver metro might not feel as far as the end of the NYC metro or even Boston metro. Why does Yankee Candle get a "seriously"? What's the skepticism about?

Quote:
Yeah, it's just you, reasonable you, not some whack like a suburbanite. I mean, we're all driving 30 miles to buy a carton of milk five times a week, no?
What on earth is the point and meaning of the comment?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 12:56 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 42,008,719 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
This is the first I've seen a beef with outlet malls in particular. What's next for "urbanists" to complain about?
The OP is not an "urbanist".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 01:01 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
It is a spread. But the average is 54 minutes. Longer than most go to a shopping mall.



What on earth is the point and meaning of the comment?
1. So what? Many people go shopping for entertainment. This is not new. My grandmother, b. 1877, used to take the train to Pittsburgh from Beaver Falls, a distance of 30 miles to shop. When my mom was a newlywed, she made my mom go with her. Fortunately for my mom, who didn't really like shopping, she had me 10 months after her marriage, and then couldn't go any more.

2. I was responding to a sanctimonious comment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 01:04 PM
 
358 posts, read 360,179 times
Reputation: 306
The few outlet malls I've been to have been in small towns that are 35+ miles outside the city, so they aren't places you can casually go to shop. But they are right off the freeway, so they're convenient to drive to if you decide to make the trip.

While I prefer denser urban development, I can see how outlet malls serve their purpose. When I was younger and more interested in fashion, I thought outlet malls were pretty cool.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top