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Old 08-25-2014, 01:05 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
1. So what? Many people go shopping for entertainment. This is not new. My grandmother, b. 1877, used to take the train to Pittsburgh from Beaver Falls, a distance of 30 miles to shop. When my mom was a newlywed, she made my mom go with her. Fortunately for my mom, who didn't really like shopping, she had me 10 months after her marriage, and then couldn't go any more.

2. I was responding to a sanctimonious comment.
1. The average is 54 minutes. That's somewhat far. Maybe people enjoy that, but it's still on the far side, farther than most malls which that conversation was on. I liked to train to the Manhattan when I lived on Long Island, a distance of 38 miles (as I just said), too. But like an outlet mall, it was going further than the local mall. My preference is irrelevant to that point, and so are others.

2. Don't know what it why a comment on the average time to get to an outlet mall is longer than the mall is sanctimonious I couldn't figure out what it's purpose was other than to annoy people.
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:08 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
1. The average is 54 minutes. That's somewhat far. Maybe people enjoy that, but it's still on the far side, farther than most malls which that conversation was on. I liked to train to the Manhattan when I lived on Long Island, a distance of 38 miles (as I just said), too. But like an outlet mall, it was going further than the local mall. My preference is irrelevant to that point, and so are others.

2. Don't know what it why a comment on the average time to get to an outlet mall is longer than the mall is sanctimonious I couldn't figure out what it's purpose was other than to annoy people.
"That's just me", as if the rest of us poor slobs didn't know any better. We all know what that means; it's a put-down.
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:11 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"That's just me", as if the rest of us poor slobs didn't know any better. We all know what that means; it's a put-down.
No, I don't know it's a put down anymore than "just sayin'" is. Believe or not, I never even noticed it or would have thought much of it, and I suspect others didn't either. Perhaps the point might be different people have a different idea of remote? It'd be nice if not everything comment was taken in the worst possible way.
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,388 posts, read 59,868,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Most outlet malls I know are tourist destinations. The jobs created by outlet malls are for mostly high schooler kids needing work. Any thoughts?
Here's my thought: If you've ever been to an outlet mall, you'd know that the workers are not "mostly high schooler kids".

Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
so they pay workers low and put local businesses out
Well, we could just close all the outlet malls and then no one would have a job.

Local businesses do not offer the same types of merchandise as outlet malls. Outlet malls - again, if you'd ever been to one you'd know this - offer merchandise not generally available at traditional retail stores. While it's true that most outlets are no longer true outlets, selling seconds or other imperfect merchandise - or, even better, cutting the tags out like the Gunne Sax factory outlet in San Francisco used to do - they still sell out-of-season goods and merchandise that didn't sell well.

So, for instance, the Jockey outlet will sell discontinued, out of season, and surplus merchandise, while the department stores will sell current, in-season merchandise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
In general they are bad just like Walmarts are bad because you have people that would rather go there even if the prices are only 1% cheaper.
And that's "bad" ... how, exactly?

Quote:
Walmarts and Outlet Malls destroys business communities because they do nothing but kill businesses in a community and they don't depend on local businesses as much.
No? "Walmarts" still has to purchase supplies and services. While some may be centralized within the organization, usually for economy of scale and uniformity, many others are not.

For instance, my local "Walmarts" purchases bread and other baked goods from the bakery down the road. The "Walmarts" in the next town over deals with a different local supplier. And so on and so on.
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
The few outlet malls I've been to have been in small towns that are 35+ miles outside the city, so they aren't places you can casually go to shop. But they are right off the freeway, so they're convenient to drive to if you decide to make the trip.

While I prefer denser urban development, I can see how outlet malls serve their purpose. When I was younger and more interested in fashion, I thought outlet malls were pretty cool.
Actually, I know people who do go to those places just to shop. The outlet mall in Castle Rock, CO is quite large, Outlets at Castle Rock :: 5050 Factory Shops Blvd, Suite 437, Castle Rock, CO. 80108 :: (303) 688-4495 Click on the map and you'll see lots of stores; I didn't bother to count them. You can also see that they offer shopping packages and group tours. They have a scrub store. My daughter used to live in the same subdivision; I liked going to that store.
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:16 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Here's my thought: If you've ever been to an outlet mall, you'd know that the workers are not "mostly high schooler kids".


Well, we could just close all the outlet malls and then no one would have a job.

Local businesses do not offer the same types of merchandise as outlet malls. Outlet malls - again, if you'd ever been to one you'd know this - offer merchandise not generally available at traditional retail stores. While it's true that most outlets are no longer true outlets, selling seconds or other imperfect merchandise - or, even better, cutting the tags out like the Gunne Sax factory outlet in San Francisco used to do - they still sell out-of-season goods and merchandise that didn't sell well.

So, for instance, the Jockey outlet will sell discontinued, out of season, and surplus merchandise, while the department stores will sell current, in-season merchandise.


And that's "bad" ... how, exactly?

No? "Walmarts" still has to purchase supplies and services. While some may be centralized within the organization, usually for economy of scale and uniformity, many others are not.

For instance, my local "Walmarts" purchases bread and other baked goods from the bakery down the road. The "Walmarts" in the next town over deals with a different local supplier. And so on and so on.
Our Walmart has many Colorado-grown foods, esp. sweet corn, 25c per ear!
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Actually, I know people who do go to those places just to shop. The outlet mall in Castle Rock, CO is quite large, Outlets at Castle Rock :: 5050 Factory Shops Blvd, Suite 437, Castle Rock, CO. 80108 :: (303) 688-4495 Click on the map and you'll see lots of stores; I didn't bother to count them. You can also see that they offer shopping packages and group tours. They have a scrub store. My daughter used to live in the same subdivision; I liked going to that store.
Oh, definitely. That's what I was trying to say. People make the trip there to specifically shop vs. running up to Target to quickly pick something up.
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,388 posts, read 59,868,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
The few outlet malls I've been to have been in small towns that are 35+ miles outside the city, so they aren't places you can casually go to shop. But they are right off the freeway, so they're convenient to drive to if you decide to make the trip.
They also get people who are just passing through, in addition to the destination shoppers. I can't tell you how many times I've stopped at the outlet malls to visit a specific store or two while traveling. I pull in, get what I want or need, and continue on my way to my final destination.

More variety than a rest stop - potentially more expensive, too.

If the outlet malls were located within towns and cities, they would not get the shoppers who are just passing through.
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:38 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,896,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Where do you get that from? What makes you think "Mom and Pop's" pay the workers more, or have better benefits? I don't think any of these malls are driving out local businesses, either.
At least mom and pop, from my experience, are nicer and mom and pop are making more and if buy from mom and pop then more goes back to your local economy.
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Old 08-25-2014, 01:43 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,896,442 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Here's my thought: If you've ever been to an outlet mall, you'd know that the workers are not "mostly high schooler kids".


Well, we could just close all the outlet malls and then no one would have a job.

Local businesses do not offer the same types of merchandise as outlet malls. Outlet malls - again, if you'd ever been to one you'd know this - offer merchandise not generally available at traditional retail stores. While it's true that most outlets are no longer true outlets, selling seconds or other imperfect merchandise - or, even better, cutting the tags out like the Gunne Sax factory outlet in San Francisco used to do - they still sell out-of-season goods and merchandise that didn't sell well.

So, for instance, the Jockey outlet will sell discontinued, out of season, and surplus merchandise, while the department stores will sell current, in-season merchandise.


And that's "bad" ... how, exactly?

No? "Walmarts" still has to purchase supplies and services. While some may be centralized within the organization, usually for economy of scale and uniformity, many others are not.

For instance, my local "Walmarts" purchases bread and other baked goods from the bakery down the road. The "Walmarts" in the next town over deals with a different local supplier. And so on and so on.
At my outlet mall, I've noticed it's usually college students going to community college or higher schoolers working. Management tend to be way older than that. I haven't observed at other outlet malls. Sure there are some adults that work there too, but from the stores I've been to, it's been high schoolers and college students working. Maybe a less wealthy area might have more adults working because they are more desperate for jobs.

I know what outlet mall stores sell, but my concern is, people shop at the PacSun Outlet instead of the locally owned surf attire store. I'm saying my area might have had more locally owned clothing stores if we didn't have outlet malls.
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