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Old 08-25-2014, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,808,315 times
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In the Bay Area, outlets are at the outskirts of the metro. I was happy when a new outlet mall, more compactly designed, opened in a suburb closer to me. The other outlets were about 45 miles away. We made it a day trip. The new one is 35 miles away, in a direction I am likely to go. There is an outlet mall, or semi-outlet mall, in a more central location that used to be a regular mall. It rebranded and transitioned to outlet and is more popular.

When i lived in SC, in a tourist area, the outlets were just another draw for visitors. It was also on the outskirts.
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Old 08-26-2014, 06:13 AM
Status: "How long till Fall?" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Where my bills arrive
8,177 posts, read 9,642,856 times
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Here in Virginia the Outlet malls at Williamsburg and Potomac Mills are both accessible by mass transit.
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:49 AM
 
Location: NYC
13,079 posts, read 8,860,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Here is a post about Walmart from another forum:

This is the first I've seen a beef with outlet malls in particular. What's next for "urbanists" to complain about?
Outlet malls also hurts big box retailers because it sets pricing pressures on them to compete on price. It cheapens the image of certain brands.

Michael Kors recently opened a store in an outlet mall nearby, they refuse to sell at outlet prices. They opened there just to compete but they didn't want to ruin their price points by matching outlet mall discounts.
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Old 08-26-2014, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,704 posts, read 4,692,171 times
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They are absolutely not a harmful thing. They need to be where they are so there is room for the big footprint and necessary parking- the majority of people in any metro area do not use mass transit, and so if these were to be built downtown somewhere with little to no parking, they would get far, far less business- prices would have to be higher, and it just wouldn't work well. They don't harm the retail in the city at all- it's a separate piece of the retail market.
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Old 08-26-2014, 08:42 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,064 posts, read 54,850,510 times
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This is why they are located out in the middle of nowhere, far from the regular retail centers. We have 3 in the area, one is in North Bend, WA, about 30 miles from Seattle, another in Marysville, 34 miles away, in Centralia 84 miles away and another in Burlington, 66 miles away. All are located adjacent to a major freeway in order to attract passing cars on the way somewhere. They provide many jobs for people in small towns and tax revenue not paid for by the local citizens.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:36 AM
 
38,555 posts, read 15,106,512 times
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I've been to several outlet stores and wonder what the big whoop is. The prices don't seem that much better. Taking sales and coupons into account, regular store prices might be even better.

Maybe having all the brand name stores in one location is appealing to some, but that's the only advantage I see.
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Old 08-26-2014, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,137 posts, read 102,962,171 times
Reputation: 33178
Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
Outlet malls also hurts big box retailers because it sets pricing pressures on them to compete on price. It cheapens the image of certain brands.

Michael Kors recently opened a store in an outlet mall nearby, they refuse to sell at outlet prices. They opened there just to compete but they didn't want to ruin their price points by matching outlet mall discounts.
Honest to Pete, don't you believe in the free market and/or competition?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
I've been to several outlet stores and wonder what the big whoop is. The prices don't seem that much better. Taking sales and coupons into account, regular store prices might be even better.

Maybe having all the brand name stores in one location is appealing to some, but that's the only advantage I see.
The scrubs I buy at the outlet mall are standard retail price, but they're still cheaper than at the fancy uniform shops. My daughter says she gets good deals at Ann Taylor and Coach purses outlet stores.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,999 posts, read 5,356,027 times
Reputation: 18152
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
At least mom and pop, from my experience, are nicer and mom and pop are making more and if buy from mom and pop then more goes back to your local economy.
Mom and Pop are the worst people to work for unless you are son or daughter.
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Old 08-30-2014, 08:57 PM
 
5,736 posts, read 8,816,908 times
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From what I read - outlet stores prefer to be away from traditional shopping centers - they don't want to cut into the full price business. That's why you see them in resort areas or off the interstate in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 09-12-2014, 07:08 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,926,684 times
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I think higher end clothes are going out. People would rather spend money on other things. I worked at Ross for a while and it's booming. We get all sorts of people from all socio economic classes coming to shop.

Ross, Marshall's, TJ'Maxx, Old Navy, Payless Shoes, Famous Footwear, Kohl's, Fallas Parades, Burlington Coat Factory, Beall's, and Forever 21 are really popular right now. I think JcPenney's and Macy's are doing okay because of their sales, but Sear's is definitely going out. Nordstrom's seems to do well because of their return policy right now. Sak's is still around because they cater to the "old money" crowd.

Many people around where I live aren't too concerned on having the nicest clothes, but are more concerned on where they live and also healthy eating is getting popular here like shopping at health food markets.
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