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Old 08-26-2014, 08:04 AM
 
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*I used 21st century so as to not confuse people by using a term such as "new urbanism" or something that already has a loose definition*

I was reading this and the author made a good point that I've never, but have never really thought about it when it comes to how plan and build urban centers:

Quote:
And of course the two malls themselves, once you get inside, are great places to walk. Here's where Tysons gets interesting. In the United States, urban places are almost always old places — places where the built environment predates the automobile and the streetscape is oriented old mass transit lines, often ones that no longer exist. And when people think of new urban places, they often have in mind the idea of nostalgically recreating those old kind of places. But the parts of Tysons that work as a city aren't throwbacks at all. They more closely resemble an urban form you might see in Asia where urban density and newness aren't necessarily seen as enemies.
DC just got a new subway line, and it

The author has a point. Here, whenever we talk about urbanism, we tend to make urban policy zero in on trends from centuries past(Europeanizing). Cities such as Singapore, Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Tokyo show that you can have really advanced cities that are dense, contain affordable housing, don't necessarily rely on old pre-automobile trends

What do you guys think when it comes to developing American cities, especially growing ones in places down in the south like Atlanta or west coast such as Los Angeles and Seattle? Tyson's seems to be developing that way and parts of Arlington were planned out that way as well.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:48 AM
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Vancouver and some other Canadian infill are similar in being dense, new and somewhat walkable.
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Old 08-26-2014, 11:53 AM
 
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I forgot about Vancouver. From the pictures I've seen of the city, it definitely does seem like that.
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Old 08-26-2014, 01:22 PM
 
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It sounds so new, yet when I think about it, Tyson's Corner sounds awfully like Metropolis (Superman's or of the movie of the same name); we see wide roads, vertical separation of travel modes, and mid-high density.
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Old 08-26-2014, 01:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Hi Octa, welcome back! School year starting again?

I'd be careful about including Tokyo in this group as a role model.
Freakonomics » Why Are Japanese Homes Disposable? A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast
https://www.google.com/search?q=hous...x-a&channel=sb
Vacant Japan Homes Show Holes in Abenomics

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 08-26-2014 at 02:37 PM..
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Old 08-26-2014, 06:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Hi Octa, welcome back! School year starting again?

I'd be careful about including Tokyo in this group as a role model.
Freakonomics » Why Are Japanese Homes Disposable? A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast
https://www.google.com/search?q=hous...x-a&channel=sb
Vacant Japan Homes Show Holes in Abenomics
While your point is taken, and I enjoyed the Freakonomics link, I think Tokyo fits in to the context of the OP.
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Old 08-26-2014, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Hi Octa, welcome back! School year starting again?

I'd be careful about including Tokyo in this group as a role model.
Freakonomics » Why Are Japanese Homes Disposable? A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast
https://www.google.com/search?q=hous...x-a&channel=sb
Vacant Japan Homes Show Holes in Abenomics
Hong Kong is exactly the same.

Bloomberg is fast-tracking a plan to knock down obsolete buildings near Grand Central* - NY Daily News

Focuses on office buildings, but the majority of housing stock in Hong Kong (especially HK Island, although increasingly the New Territories are seeing the same thing) is also very new. Of course, there's the opposite end of that as well. What was appropriate 50+ years ago maybe isn't today the best use of land today. Cities are dynamic and ever changing. Europe especially is infatuated with old stuff. Eg, Paris the most prominent business district isn't even in Paris. It's in a suburb.
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:09 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Europe especially is infatuated with old stuff. Eg, Paris the most prominent business district isn't even in Paris. It's in a suburb.
No, it's not. The business district in Paris is several times larger by employment-wise and office space than any other. Just because it lacks skyscrapers doesn't mean it's not a business district. Old numbers, but Paris has 1.1 million workers in its "downtown", spread out over 11 square miles.


La Défense is denser, but much smaller.

Last edited by Yac; 08-27-2014 at 06:48 AM..
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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And?

I said prominent, not has the most cafe employees.

But don't take my word for it. According to France, it's the most prominent in Europe. I don't know if I agree with that but, but for France it certainly is.
La Défense, a leading district for European affairs: information and maps - France.fr
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:27 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
And?

I said prominent, not has the most cafe employees.

But don't take my word for it. According to France, it's the most prominent in Europe. I don't know if I agree with that but, but for France it certainly is.
La Défense, a leading district for European affairs: information and maps - France.fr
From pages 12-13: CBD within Paris has 6.8 million sq m of office space, La Défense has 3.8 million sq m. La Défense is described as the largest purpose-built business district.

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Why_invest_in_Paris/$FILE/Why_invest_in_Paris.pdf
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