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Old 09-07-2014, 02:36 PM
 
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I remember when the USPS had been serving a neighborhood in a blue-collar suburb from an adjacent white-collar one. When they reassigned it to match the actual municipal boundary, residents protested. I am sure there are many more cases. Probably affects property values, if less than municipal, school, and Park District boundaries.
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Old 09-08-2014, 10:54 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyonpa View Post
ZipCodes / Mailing address have no relationship to Political Boundaries .

The Only thing "Officially" the USPS does not cross with a Zipcode/office boundary is a State line.

But in Practice there are some rural address that The Box is over the state line, and get serviced by the adjoining states post office.
It would be more accurate to say that political boundaries aren't dispositive of zip codes in most cases, though some regions are more finicky about this than others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyonpa View Post
Honestly you can put Anytown, XX ZipCode

As long as the zipcode is correct it will get to the correct post office.
Each USPS has a "preferred name," along with a list of "acceptable alternatives." Getting the zip code right is definitely the most important thing, but putting down the wrong name can delay delivery (or so they say).

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
It might be because I grew up in New England, but there, it seemed like even small towns always had their own zip code, although cities may have multiple zips.
PA is a mix when it comes to this, though generally speaking, boroughs and cities are much more likely to get corresponding zips than townships.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I remember when the USPS had been serving a neighborhood in a blue-collar suburb from an adjacent white-collar one. When they reassigned it to match the actual municipal boundary, residents protested. I am sure there are many more cases. Probably affects property values, if less than municipal, school, and Park District boundaries.
Property values, perhaps (and insurance premiums most definitely). The rest would stay the same, at least in PA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
In Pittsburgh, certain suburbs which are all the way out at the county line (or even in a few cases just over it) still have Pittsburgh mailing addresses, which can get confusing, particularly because some real estate sites like Trulia base city searches on zip codes.

Worse, there are named zip codes in the suburbs which don't actually exist, like Warrendale, Glenshaw, Wexford, etc. People who are long-term residents tend to identify more correctly with their township or borough, but often newcomers get confused and say they are "from" the zip code name.
They don't exist as municipalities, but they do correspond to neighborhoods/areas. It wouldn't be innaccurate to say you're "from Wexford," as long as you're aware of the municipality to which your address corresponds.

Out on Philly's Main Line, for instance, a lot of zip codes that were named after longstanding communities (and not postwar inventions) cross municipal/County lines. All the same, saying you're from, say, Ardmore, tells the listener much more than just "Lower Merion Township" or "Haverford Township."
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Old 09-08-2014, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Where my bills arrive
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Here in Richmond VA many of the suburban counties had "Richmond" as their city but they all put in and got it changed. The reason was tax money's from businesses, for example Target sends the quarterly tax payment in for their stores in Henrico County but the mailing address was Richmond they don't know the differnce. Now the city was supposed to send those monies back to the county but they kept failing to do that to the tune of 2+ million dollars.

Postal boundaries don't adhere to political boundries but more and more they are being adjusted to do just that.
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Old 09-08-2014, 01:43 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
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Actually the Zip+4+2 database resolves each address in the United States (and overseas FPO APO EPO Etc ) into it political unit.

That was put in so internet retailers that need to charge sales taxes can calculate the correct tax rate, and send the data and money (Normally thru the state tax office) to the correct tax receiving unit.
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Old 09-09-2014, 08:02 AM
 
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VA Yankee beat me to it with the answer to "how does this apply to urban planning".
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Old 06-06-2015, 03:18 PM
 
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The problem is that ZIP codes are based on efficiency of handling mail, not on political or neighborhood boundaries. They are supposedly substantially equal in volume of mail. Of course it is a nuisance when someone registers for a library or park district program and is surprised to be getting charged nonresident rates.
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Old 06-06-2015, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyonpa View Post
Honestly you can put Anytown, XX ZipCode

As long as the zipcode is correct it will get to the correct post office.
Usually, but here in the Pittsburgh area, we sometimes have the same street names repeating within the same zip code.


2 different Laurel Avenues, one in Avalon one in Bellevue, both with the same zip.

Numbered streets in Sharpsburg and Aspinwall have the same names, same zip, and the name of the town may be necessary.
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Old 06-06-2015, 06:31 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
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From a quick Google Street view It looks like the Laurel off Church Street is in the 100 block range,

The one Between Spring/Grant is in the 200-400? block range. They can be in the same zipcode since the Zip5+4+2 will resolve the barcode on the bottom (or window) of the envelope to be sorted to the correct route.

Aspinwall has 1st thru 5th Street, Sharpsburg has 6th- 23rd. Different street number, More then enough for the USPS zip codeing to separate them for route sortation within the same zipcode.


I know alot of town/cities did alot of address numbering/changing when 911 was put into effect in the 80/90's so there would not be duplicate address within small geographic area severed by 911 Center. This was done in coordination with the USPS.
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Old 06-06-2015, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:

Aspinwall has 1st thru 5th Street, Sharpsburg has 6th- 23rd. Different street number, More then enough for the USPS zip codeing to separate them for route sortation within the same zipcode.

There is definitely a 1st through 5th St. in Sharpsburg, off of S. Main.
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Old 06-06-2015, 08:20 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,126 posts, read 17,129,667 times
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ahh... Miss it down by the bridge. But Still a different house/biz Number Range.

From what I saw. Did not pull the National Zip DB, from work to check it, but from google looks like different Block Ranges.
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