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Old 09-12-2014, 03:59 AM
 
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While the big question on high speed rail in America is, can it get built? There is a possibility it can. Efforts in CA and TX attempt to do it without Federal funds. But once either one succeeds, who will the riders be? Everyone assumes business and leisure travelers along with rail fans. But I suspect many commuters. When stations 160 km away from job centers become only n hour away, they can become residential. I heard someone talking about a train trip from Florence to Rome, about that distance, and he said it was mostly commuters. Just as commuter trains built the suburbs century ago, it might happen again.
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Old 09-12-2014, 09:18 AM
 
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High speed rail in other parts of the US won't be much different from the Acela - just faster.
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Old 09-12-2014, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
328 posts, read 254,250 times
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I've stated this in the LinkedIn transportation planning boards - the aim could be at the business travelers that travel 300 or so miles by plane to business destinations. For example, BNA's #1 outgoing departures are to ATL, about 240+ miles away. Many of those travelers are connecting, but many are doing business in Atlanta. If, and a big if, you have a HSR option that connected you from Midtown Atlanta to downtown Nashville that took 1hr 45min to 2 hours, you could siphon many travelers from planes.

Now this is a hypothetical because I don't believe you could get HSR tracks through the mountain range in SE Tennessee, so this is just an example of cities that are close enough for HSR but far enough that most business travelers fly the distance.
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Old 09-12-2014, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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I would love to see high speed rail in the Northwest.
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Old 09-12-2014, 03:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
While the big question on high speed rail in America is, can it get built? There is a possibility it can. Efforts in CA and TX attempt to do it without Federal funds. But once either one succeeds, who will the riders be? Everyone assumes business and leisure travelers along with rail fans. But I suspect many commuters. When stations 160 km away from job centers become only n hour away, they can become residential. I heard someone talking about a train trip from Florence to Rome, about that distance, and he said it was mostly commuters. Just as commuter trains built the suburbs century ago, it might happen again.
Speaking re: California, I believe it is very likely Los Banos would see a big bump in population as SF bay area residents use HSR to hold down commute times from a cheaper area. Commuters will likely be a big component of ridership from the central valley.
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Old 09-16-2014, 09:28 AM
 
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It would wonderful to have a high speed train between the American coasts but I know this is just a fantasy!
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Old 09-16-2014, 07:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
It would wonderful to have a high speed train between the American coasts but I know this is just a fantasy!

Wrong application for HSR. We need to use the right tool for the right job.
HSR competes VERY well with the airlines for trips under 400 miles with few or no stops.
Coast to coast would have way too many stops and take MUCH longer than flying.
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Old 09-17-2014, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
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HSR will work well iff reliable local transit networks are developed to serve the region. Raleigh to Atlanta is high on the list of HSR corridors, but public transit within the cities need to coordinate and link up with HSR to serve residents.

Look at the abysmal location of Atlanta's Amtrak station, disconnected from MARTA rail .

https://www.google.com/maps/place/At...370056d2?hl=en

Additionally,rail transit for the Atlanta metro area as a whole is seriously lacking. Commuter rail is also necessary at this point.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/At...370056d2?hl=en
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Old 09-17-2014, 02:29 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,957,397 times
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I was just listening to a podcast about how smaller cities are losing flights - fast. After deregulation and as the industry continues to consolidate it's an inevitable outcome . . . and as I keep saying here there is no such thing as unsubsidized transportation people need to come to terms with that and we should start putting those subsidies into the best mode for that journey.

Take Philly to Pittsburgh as an example. It's typically a 5.5 hour drive/300 miles. The flight time is around 40 minutes while the time on the plane usually takes around 1h40m. Add in the extra time it takes to get to/from either airport and the extra time for airport security and you're talking at least 3 hours of travel time. True HSR would make the trip (with a stop in Harrisburg) in under 2 hours but even using existing Amtrak technology, if the trip was around 3 hours I would take the train every time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adi from the Brunswicks View Post
HSR will work well iff reliable local transit networks are developed to serve the region. Raleigh to Atlanta is high on the list of HSR corridors, but public transit within the cities need to coordinate and link up with HSR to serve residents.
I don't understand why taking HSR from Philly to Pittsburgh (for instance) would be any different than flying there. PIT is out in the middle of nowhere. You can already rent cars at busy Amtrak stations . . . or I could just walk to a Zipcar pod since the PGH train station is already downtown.
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Old 09-17-2014, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,120,354 times
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I would take the California HSR from LA to the Bay and visa-versa. Driving up the 5 is tortuous and a bit terrifying. Probably some of the worst driving in the world goes down on that stretch of highway - the HSR would be a welcome relief.
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