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View Poll Results: Should public transportation be free?
Yes 21 20.19%
No 69 66.35%
That depends on what form of transportation 14 13.46%
Voters: 104. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-15-2014, 02:15 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm31828 View Post
That must be in very particular areas- the vast, vast majority of systems in the US would be fed by park and rides. Our towns and cities are just not laid out in such a way that this type of "walk to the train" access would currently or ever exist in the future. I can definitely see that in places like New York and some parts of some other dense cities in the NE, but not almost anywhere else.
First, I wasn't considering just the US.

But as to the bolded, that's usually what I have mind when I think of rail transit and except for commuter rail, how I've used rail transit. Those dense areas, however, tend to get much more transit users. Los Angeles' red line has no park and rides, either. Even Seattle will likely get a substantial portion of ridership from walking to its light rail, even most people aren't in walking distance.
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Old 09-15-2014, 02:17 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Opin_Yunated View Post
Driving also is a net economic drain on society. Mass transit is not. I've already listed how
I didn't find most of those arguments particularly convincing, and likely many posters didn't. Some of the stuff we discuss is really more value judgement and taste rather than something objectively better.

For an area to spread out for efficient transit, it would be hard to argue that driving is a net negative. There's the economic negative of lots of oil use, true, but the benefit of connectivity.
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Old 09-15-2014, 02:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k350 View Post
Roads are what makes the economy, without it, delivery services would not run, emergency services, etc, every modernized nation in the world has an outstanding road service.
Roads are very valuable. Perhaps they are even critical to a modern economy. But, not all roads are equal. Roads, namely backbones like highways, freeways, and expressways, don't need to be free to use (a gas tax is not a use fee). A roadway can be effective, efficient, key to an economy, yet carry tolls. These are not mutually exclusive ideas.

Meanwhile, rails have made and continue to make the economy run. It is simply that, because we have shifted subsidies from rails (via land grants) to roads, trucking has become so important. There's nothing inherent to trucking that makes it superior to trains for long-distance hauling. Meanwhile, trucking doesn't scale as well as trains.

Unfortunately, PT providers are attacked for requiring high subsidies but are required to be inelastic to demand (service low-demand routes and times) and, generally, cannot capture the property value of infrastructure investments (eg, building retail next to a major BRT route). Of course, in that situation PT agencies are going to require high subsidy; they can't respond to the market the way a private firm would.
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Old 09-15-2014, 05:31 PM
 
Location: East Dallas
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It should it definitely would reduce traffic. Before DART the Dallas Bus Company offered free rides on bunny busses in downtown Dallas and it was used by many.
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
25 posts, read 25,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
One benefit of free buses is it speeds up boarding time. Of course there are other ways to speed boarding up, but when you can pay cash at the front it can often slow things down a lot.
Well said
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
25 posts, read 25,783 times
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I may have worded my question badly.

What I mean is, Should public transportation have free FARES. Sorry for the misunderstanding.
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
25 posts, read 25,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
And another thing.

How come the "free" bus that my taxes pay for runs right past your house, but not mine?

How come I have to drive to work because of my schedule, but you can take the train for free?
Because some people, or should I say smarter people, live within blocks of public transportation that can take them to work. If you want to live an hour or so away from the nearest public transportation, that's fine.
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Old 09-15-2014, 09:45 PM
eok
 
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One advantage of making public transportation free is that we then no longer have the cost of collecting and accounting for the fares. If we're going to pay most of it with taxes anyway, it might make sense to get rid of that overhead. But then again, it might not. It's a complicated issue with a lot of factors to take into account.
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Old 09-16-2014, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,905 posts, read 3,584,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandskyMan View Post
Because some people, or should I say smarter people, live within blocks of public transportation that can take them to work. If you want to live an hour or so away from the nearest public transportation, that's fine.
LOL Some people, or should I say smart people, can pay for their own transportation. If you want to take public transportation, that's fine, but pay for it yourself.
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Old 09-16-2014, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,905 posts, read 3,584,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandskyMan View Post
Because some people, or should I say smarter people, live within blocks of public transportation that can take them to work. If you want to live an hour or so away from the nearest public transportation, that's fine.
Seriously though, you're not thinking or expressing yourself clearly. If you want to be an advocate of public transportation then don't go around telling everyone you're smarter than they are.

You as an advocate of public transportation should not be thinking in terms of "too bad if you live too far away", but rather "let's work to make public transportation available to everyone".
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