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Old 09-16-2014, 10:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by james777 View Post
It is urban, without a doubt. How is the public transportation? In all of the photos that I have seen of the Plaza area, I have not seen any high rise parking garages. In other areas of that type that I have seen in or near major cities, there are high rise parking garages everywhere.

I know there are buses but not sure how good transit is to downtown.
The only parking lots I know of are multi-story in the center of a couple of blocks.
You don't see anything but the entry. The structure is hidden by street front buildings.
There are a few retail stores with a handful of surface spaces, but that is the exception.
Most mid-rise residential is underground parking.
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Old 09-16-2014, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Thanks for all of the replies, they have been very interesting. I didn't expect such a diverse response.

The Plaza was basically a streetcar suburb that evolved into a secondary business district although it's primary uses are residential and retail rather than office, although there is several million sq ft of office as well.

While this part of KC has pretty good transit, I wouldn't say that it's heavily used by most that patronize the area. Parking is mostly underground, but there are also many above ground garages, although most are wrapped in retail or architectural details.

Quote:
Originally Posted by james777 View Post
It is urban, without a doubt. How is the public transportation? In all of the photos that I have seen of the Plaza area, I have not seen any high rise parking garages. In other areas of that type that I have seen in or near major cities, there are high rise parking garages everywhere.
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Old 09-17-2014, 02:03 AM
 
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Of course it is. It's one of the pleasantest non-downtown urban areas in the country.

Also Westwood (L.A.), Evanston, Bethesda, Cambridge, etc. etc. Most of these are outside the parent city limits, but Country Club Plaza is inside them, as is Westwood.
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Old 09-17-2014, 04:47 AM
 
Location: Columbus OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Siegel View Post
Of course it is. It's one of the pleasantest non-downtown urban areas in the country.

Also Westwood (L.A.), Evanston, Bethesda, Cambridge, etc. etc. Most of these are outside the parent city limits, but Country Club Plaza is inside them, as is Westwood.
I agree with this 100%. The Country Club district is one of the oldest, pre-planned developments in the country, and over the past 90 years or so has evolved into an urban gem. It's very walkable, densely developed, is well connected to surrounding areas, and has a wide mix of uses.
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Old 09-17-2014, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Denver
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It's a really awesome neighborhood but lacking in some pedestrian infrastructure. It's more urban than it is anything else though, but I'd lean more on semi-urban.
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Old 09-17-2014, 09:13 AM
 
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Urban....
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Old 09-17-2014, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Despite all the high rises, the population density is quite a bit lower than Pasadena. That area has a census tract at 13k/sq mile and two more at 9k/sq mile. Pasadena has at least half a dozen at 13k/sq mile, with a few at around 20k/sq mile. There's a lot of space in between buildings, and less developed land away from the river. Surprising amount of new stuff for an old city:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Kansa...44.71,,0,-5.01

Pasadena's probably more urban, though I might look less urban from an overhead view.
That's not surprising, I suppose I was mostly just comparing the Old Town Pasadena section to the Country Club District. The population density of Old Town is much lower than the rest of Pasadena because it is primarily a shopping and jobs district. Seems like that may be a bit of the case with the Country Club District as well.
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Old 09-17-2014, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Siegel View Post
Of course it is. It's one of the pleasantest non-downtown urban areas in the country.

Also Westwood (L.A.), Evanston, Bethesda, Cambridge, etc. etc. Most of these are outside the parent city limits, but Country Club Plaza is inside them, as is Westwood.
I can see the comparison to Westwood for sure. From the pictures it seems like the Country Club District has more similarities architecturally-speaking to Westwood Village than my comparison, Old Town Pasadena.
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Old 09-17-2014, 10:21 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
That's not surprising, I suppose I was mostly just comparing the Old Town Pasadena section to the Country Club District. The population density of Old Town is much lower than the rest of Pasadena because it is primarily a shopping and jobs district. Seems like that may be a bit of the case with the Country Club District as well.
It looks like the opposite, there's a bunch of big apartment buildings in the country Club district. Going away from it, the densities decline to levels lower (many of it <7000 / sq mi) than what I would consider urban. I'd say the area is urban, but it's an "urban island".
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Old 09-17-2014, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Areas to the south and southwest are VERY suburban.

Last edited by kcmo; 09-17-2014 at 12:39 PM..
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