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Old 09-28-2014, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
You guys make things as simple as "walking" so complicated... i thought it was just simply dense environments, sidewalks, crosswalks, etc.. now all of a sudden you guys can't walk because the buildings outside are too new?
It sounds like it, old buildings are always nice, living in the NYC metro and working in Brooklyn for a couple of years I was surrounded by old buildings on every street. But then when in the Northwest, there are neighborhoods and districts where there aren't really old buildings and just about everything is new, but is still walkable and a pleasant area to be in.

Lovejoy St, there is really nothing historical about this street, but it is a very pleasant street to walk down with a number of shops, cafes, and such along it.


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Old 09-28-2014, 07:28 PM
 
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A mix of old and new is ideal. If you look at the most "urban" and "walkable" neighborhoods, they usually have a lot of variety. Greenwich Village in NYC and the neighborhood by Rittenhouse Square in Philadelphia are probably two of the best of examples of this.
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Old 09-28-2014, 07:32 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,989 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
You guys make things as simple as "walking" so complicated... i thought it was just simply dense environments, sidewalks, crosswalks, etc.. now all of a sudden you guys can't walk because the buildings outside are too new?
The buildings are too new; it's not an "interesting" enough walk; there are no bars or coffee shops on the trip; there are too many curb cuts; the reasons something isn't walkable are endless.

First world problem! Whatever happened to just walking from Point A to Point B, around some of the obstacles, watching for traffic?
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Old 09-28-2014, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by Frank Bones View Post
A mix of old and new is ideal. If you look at the most "urban" and "walkable" neighborhoods, they usually have a lot of variety. Greenwich Village in NYC and the neighborhood by Rittenhouse Square in Philadelphia are probably two of the best of examples of this.
That has more to do with those neighborhoods being built before cars, thus is why more historical areas are more walkable.
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Old 09-28-2014, 08:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That has more to do with those neighborhoods being built before cars, thus is why more historical areas are more walkable.
Precisely.
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Old 09-29-2014, 03:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The buildings are too new; it's not an "interesting" enough walk; there are no bars or coffee shops on the trip; there are too many curb cuts; the reasons something isn't walkable are endless.

First world problem! Whatever happened to just walking from Point A to Point B, around some of the obstacles, watching for traffic?
Whatever happened to just walking from point A to point B was that the built form and layout of cities changed away from being people-centric to vehicle-centric.

What's so wrong with trying to describe why people don't walk as much as they used to? As a nurse, would you expect a doctor to tell a patient who has come in with neck pain to quit being whiny? You'd probably expect the doctor to examine the patient and figure out why ou has neck pain. Few pedestrians is a symptom, just like neck pain, and is something to be examined and dealt with.
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Old 09-29-2014, 07:01 PM
 
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Whatever happened to walking from Point A to Point B? The second half of the 20th century happened, which made Point A and Point B generally so far apart that walking there became far more difficult, so nowadays people typically drive there.

urbanlife78: I'm not that familiar with Portland, but isn't the Pearl District built in an old industrial area, where there are a lot of old brick industrial buildings? The presence of the roof-mounted water tank in that shot suggests the presence of older architecture. Puttering around in Google Maps shows a mixture of older industrial buildings (the one with the water tank is across from a one-story Art Deco building, a mid-rise brick building with arched windows a block or so away) and newer architecture--just the sort of mixture of ages we're talking about here. The best part is that you don't have to know anything about history or architecture to appreciate it--people just seem to like that kind of eclectic visual backdrop. Plus it helps that there is such a mixture of uses, high residential density, and public transit (I love the "Go By Streetcar" sign!) that helps catalyze all the shops and cafes at sidewalk level.
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Old 09-29-2014, 07:24 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,989 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
Whatever happened to just walking from point A to point B was that the built form and layout of cities changed away from being people-centric to vehicle-centric.

What's so wrong with trying to describe why people don't walk as much as they used to? As a nurse, would you expect a doctor to tell a patient who has come in with neck pain to quit being whiny? You'd probably expect the doctor to examine the patient and figure out why ou has neck pain. Few pedestrians is a symptom, just like neck pain, and is something to be examined and dealt with.
Analogy fail.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:37 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Please stay on the thread topic.
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Old 09-30-2014, 11:02 AM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,004,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Please stay on the thread topic.
I argue that describing how the built form affects walking and how that built form has changed such that "historic" areas represent a different built form is indeed, at the moment, on topic.
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