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Old 09-30-2014, 02:01 PM
 
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The subject of walkability is also intertwined with urbanity and historic neighborhoods--historic neighborhoods are generally more walkable by design (note: generally), which is part of what promotes the sort of urbanity we're talking about here.

Not all historic buildings are walkable--such as isolated estates, farmhouses, or industrial facilities. But historic neighborhoods, at least the ones up through the mid-20th century, tend to be walkable ones, or have the infrastructure for walkability even when integrated with new mixed-use construction. There are also historic districts of auto-centric midcentury suburban single-family homes, so no, it's not a universal rule.

Last edited by nei; 09-30-2014 at 02:04 PM.. Reason: fixed — use the report post button next time
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Old 09-30-2014, 02:07 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Why was my post moved? I specifically mentioned historic buildings visible in the photo being discussed and others nearby, and explained that viewers don't need to know a building is historic to enjoy it, and the value of their presence within the context of a neighborhood containing both new and old buildings. The post is also kind of hard to understand in a different thread than the one with the picture I'm discussing. The subject of walkability is also intertwined with urbanity and historic neighborhoods--historic neighborhoods are generally more walkable by design (note: generally), which is part of what promotes the sort of urbanity we're talking about here.

Not all historic buildings are walkable--such as isolated estates, farmhouses, or industrial facilities. But historic neighborhoods, at least the ones up through the mid-20th century, tend to be walkable ones, or have the infrastructure for walkability even when integrated with new mixed-use construction. There are also historic districts of auto-centric midcentury suburban single-family homes, so no, it's not a universal rule.

yes nailed it

can anyone name full neighborhood developed during this time (not since leveled) that does not fit

here is the largest collection of colonial housing in the country, very walkable



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr5MKMEPU3E
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Old 09-30-2014, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Yonge Street in North York Centre compares pretty well with just about any of the pre-WWII neighbourhoods of Toronto outside downtown for pedestrian counts.

Map compares Toronto's busiest intersections | CTV Toronto News

Most of North York Centre's built environment is TOD redevelopment though the "bones" are from late interurban era exurban development/early auto era suburban development. I'd say it is quite walkable, although it is pretty "hypertrophic city" with Yonge St being quite wide with a lot of traffic, and then wide sidewalks and tall buildings.

You also have neighbourhoods in Spain, like this one in a suburb of Valencia
https://www.google.ca/maps/place/Val...a351011f7f1d39

Or the neighbourhood of Delicias in Zaragoza
https://www.google.ca/maps/place/Val...a351011f7f1d39

Plus neighbourhoods in cities like Seoul and Tokyo, and Shenzhen's urban villages, which mostly have new buildings but in a walkable urban format (parts of Seoul are tower-in-the-park but not all). You also have certain neighbourhoods of Montreal, like Francois-Perrault, which I would say are not historic but still walkable (mostly built in 40s/50s).

And Yellowknife (founded in the late 30s) is not too bad for walkability as I mentioned earlier. While the buildings and wide roads are not very attractive aesthetically, it does have a good sized downtown for a town of 20,000 and with buildings that come up to the sidewalk. Walkscore for the downtown area seems to be around 90.
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Old 09-30-2014, 03:28 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post

And Yellowknife (founded in the late 30s) is not too bad for walkability as I mentioned earlier. While the buildings and wide roads are not very attractive aesthetically, it does have a good sized downtown for a town of 20,000 and with buildings that come up to the sidewalk. Walkscore for the downtown area seems to be around 90.
I thought Whitehorse was more urban?
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Old 09-30-2014, 03:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
yes nailed it

can anyone name full neighborhood developed during this time (not since leveled) that does not fit

here is the largest collection of colonial housing in the country, very walkable



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr5MKMEPU3E
I don't think Society Hill is the best example of a walkable area in Philadelphia, especially at night. There's little commercial activity and it's not exactly vibrant. The historic buildings are interesting, but you don't see too many people walking around.
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Old 09-30-2014, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
yes nailed it

can anyone name full neighborhood developed during this time (not since leveled) that does not fit

here is the largest collection of colonial housing in the country, very walkable



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr5MKMEPU3E
I think maybe some of the late interurban suburbs could be considered not walkable. Some of these interurbans were often intended to serve rural areas and towns/suburbs. It seems like there were some rural-suburb hybrids that sprung up along the lines, probably with large yards for growing vegetables, fruits, maybe chickens and such, and I guess the residents did a lot of their shopping in the city or in more urban communities along the interurban line. I guess you could argue it's not a full neighbourhood though.

Anyways, while there are communities that had most residents commuting by car before WWII (ex Kingsway or Leaside in Toronto), most of them still had a commercial area within walking distance like the streetcar suburbs. I guess the men commuted by car but their wives still shopped on foot?

Although with Moore Park/North Rosedale in Toronto, I would say they're rather on the far side (some homes 25min walk or more) from any retail, despite having been built up about 100 years ago (or more?).
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Old 09-30-2014, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I thought Whitehorse was more urban?
I'm leaning towards agreeing but Whitehorse is older. Although it officially incorporated after Yellowknife, this is a description of Whitehorse in 1900.

Quote:
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=2][font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=2][font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=2]By the spring of 1900 there were wholesale houses and retail mercantile esatblishments, a hardware store, six large hotels, two drug stores, a brick yard, 2000 feet of warehouses on the waterfront, three churches, an athletic club and an electric light plant. Tents, log houses or clapboard buildings were found on practically every lot.
The History of Whitehorse, Yukon Territory

It lost population after the gold rush though, and began growing again around the same time as Yellowknife was growing.

Last edited by nei; 09-30-2014 at 07:03 PM..
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Old 09-30-2014, 07:03 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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This house is old, but the ad barely emphasizes it as historic. Should it count? A house that old in Oregon would probably be worthy of a museum. Built in 1850.

374 Keene, Winchester, NH 03470 (MLS# 4380210) - Winchester NH Real Estate - NewEnglandMoves.com

A friend of a friend is selling a home in that town from 1835 in the same small town.
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Old 09-30-2014, 07:59 PM
 
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True enough, there is very little on the West Coast older than that aside from a few adobes and early pioneer buildings, and you didn't find adobes in Oregon (they tend to melt in the rain.) It's definitely a West Coast thing--an article I read this summer about development in Los Angeles mentioned the Hustler Store on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood as an "old landmark"--it was built in 1998!
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Old 06-14-2015, 03:07 AM
 
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Conceivably, you could have a non-historic neighborhood with historic buildings.
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