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Old 09-23-2014, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,713,463 times
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Cleveland Heights solved this problem years ago by creating large city parking spaces by large clusters of older apartment buildings as people began to acquire cars and more cars. You can purchase permits to park on a monthly basis or just park in these lots for a quarter an hour in metered areas to go shopping of visiting or whatever.

This works on several levels. The cops patrol these lots routinely so you know your car is safe. Day and night. There is always a spot for you. These spaces dot the city where there is need and they are surrounded by green spaces with trees and park benches where people can sit and have lunch or just enjoy the sunshine so they are not your typical ugly parking lots.

I have seen other cities where new construction in old neighborhoods left a huge scramble for parking when new construction did not accommodate parking. It wasn't pretty. I would vote for the new construction especially in the case of large apartment buildings to make some kind of accommodation for parking in these types of neighborhoods. And I don't own a car so my opinion isn't based on any particular need find a parking space.
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Old 09-23-2014, 05:30 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,009,570 times
Reputation: 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post
You just named a bunch, not to mention a lower speed limit sign and a cop with a radar gun.
All those things I named I implied were also, like on-street cars, presumably "clutter". You'll need to tidy up your definition of clutter if we're to understand how you differentiate.
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Old 09-23-2014, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,460 posts, read 11,970,443 times
Reputation: 10568
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yet, then eschaton said there are a lot of studies done by cities and non-profits which could give an idea of how many parking spaces are needed! That seems quite contradictory. And my opinion of non-profits is not uniformly high. There are as many sleazy non-profits as there are for-profits (the NFL as a prime example). But that's the subject for a different thread.
My point in saying there are many housing market studies which have been commissioned by cities or nonprofits is that's what's available online for free for you to browse if you so desire. There are plenty of private-sector, for-profit housing market studies, but these don't tend to get released to the public, because the developers don't want to give their competitors free research.

Quote:
Originally Posted by im_a_lawyer View Post
The point is that Houston's urban problems are due to not having enough regulations rather than having too much. Surely a developer has 100x more freedom in Houston than in NYC. One of these cities is better planned than the other.
At the same time, it should be noted that zoning only began in the U.S. when New York enacted the first zoning code in 1916. Before that all cities lacked zoning, and by and large the most lauded urban neighborhoods were built out pre-zoning. Of course, in many cases they've been hugely altered through later infill, but the overall pre-zoning structure largely remains.

Obviously correlation doesn't mean causation. A lot of other things changed during the same time period, like widespread automobile use. But I still think that a movement to micromanage urban planning to the same extent they tried to micromanage suburban planning in the mid 20th century is wrongheaded.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Also, driveway end up remove on street spaces so the gains are less than they appear.
This is exactly what has happened in one of the Pittsburgh rowhouse neighborhoods, where modern infill rowhouses with integral garages have become popular (South Side). As this neighborhood is typically so dense that you cannot get a parcel which goes from road to alley (the alley side is full of houses too) this involves a curb cut in front and a garage taking up most of the front of the first floor. The curb cuts eliminate, depending upon their location on the block, 1-2 street spaces each.

Last edited by eschaton; 09-23-2014 at 07:34 PM..
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,799,244 times
Reputation: 20547
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Thus far I've figured out that original poster Freemkt doesn't have a car and resents that he is paying the same rent as the other tenants who have cars and utilize a "free" parking space on the property. I do see his point, but I just can't get all riled up about it. It's a trifle.

Suppose a tenant doesn't cook - never uses the stove. (Yes, that would be rather unusual). And further suppose stoves are provided in every unit as part of the rent. That tenant would have the same gripe as Freemkt with his unused parking space.

I live in a 26-unit townhouse complex which has a pool. Every owner is paying 1/26 of the cost of maintaining that pool, but some people do not use it. It's just the way life is.

Find something real to complain about.
My sister owns a townhouse with a lovely kitchen. She has NEVER used the stove. She microwaves all of her meals. She has NEVER used the dishwasher either. She washes her dishes by hand. When she purchased the unit, the price included those appliances. She didn't complain and argue about them. The kitchen would look rather silly with several giant holes in it.

It's called life. Suck it up!
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,460 posts, read 11,970,443 times
Reputation: 10568
Apropos to the thread, a major new apartment project has been finalized in Oakland, the major student neighborhood in the city. The development will have 389 units, but only 275 spaces. The following exchange is useful to this discussion.

Quote:
While board commission Barbara Valaw asked the development team what will happen if more residents own cars than there are available spaces, Ambling expects that wont happen as residents live there to be in walking distance of work or school.

Holmes said that other recent apartment projects Ambling has developed in Atlanta and elsewhere resulted in only 35 percent to 65 percent of the parking spaces being used, despite what he described as an ever-present concern.

Its a concern everywhere you go, said Holmes of parking.
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,799,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
??? I'm paying more than half my income to rent a room in a dysfunctional house of five in a crappy neighborhood which is not walkable and isn't remotely close to anything. I'm below 30% of median income for one person, and there is very little housing cheap enough to be considered affordable at 30 percent.
Your problem isn't rent. Your problem is your job. Get a better paying job and the rent fixes it's self. You could also move to a different location.
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,051 posts, read 102,770,515 times
Reputation: 33099
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post

This is exactly what has happened in of the Pittsburgh rowhouse neighborhoods, where modern infill rowhouses with integral garages have become popular. As this neighborhood is typically so dense that you cannot get a parcel which goes from road to alley (the alley side is full of houses too) this involves a curb cut in front and a garage taking up most of the front of the first floor. The curb cuts eliminate, depending upon their location on the block, 1-2 street spaces each.
OMG! Curb cuts! Yes, I'm being sarcastic.

Again, when we visited our daughter in St. Paul, we pulled up to park the car and she said we had to move it. We were parked in front of a walking path (concrete) that led from the sidewalk through the grass strip to the street. The residents complain when someone does that. Talk about "Minnesota Nice"! So curb cut, no curb cut, what's the difference?
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:28 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,089,742 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
OMG! Curb cuts! Yes, I'm being sarcastic.

Again, when we visited our daughter in St. Paul, we pulled up to park the car and she said we had to move it. We were parked in front of a walking path (concrete) that led from the sidewalk through the grass strip to the street. The residents complain when someone does that. Talk about "Minnesota Nice"! So curb cut, no curb cut, what's the difference?
Not sure what you're asking or what you're trying to say. If there's a driving space or curb cut, you can't street park in front of it. Or often within say 3 feet of it. So the off street parking gained is partially lost in street parking.
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,590,013 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
OMG! Curb cuts! Yes, I'm being sarcastic.

Again, when we visited our daughter in St. Paul, we pulled up to park the car and she said we had to move it. We were parked in front of a walking path (concrete) that led from the sidewalk through the grass strip to the street. The residents complain when someone does that. Talk about "Minnesota Nice"! So curb cut, no curb cut, what's the difference?
Just about anywhere you go you could get a ticket for parking in a cross walk. Also when you park up to the corner, it makes it harder for other drivers to see when they are turning onto other streets.
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,051 posts, read 102,770,515 times
Reputation: 33099
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Just about anywhere you go you could get a ticket for parking in a cross walk. Also when you park up to the corner, it makes it harder for other drivers to see when they are turning onto other streets.
It wasn't a freaking crosswalk! Read my description again. It was a little path, in this case paved, that led from the sidewalk across the grassy strip between the sidewalk and the street to the street, sort of an extension of the sidewalk from the house to the main sidewalk. It was in the middle of the damn block! It wasn't an automobile road; it was a walking path. I'm not that dumb, urbanlife78. I did pass a "rules of the road" test in three states.

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9777...bQ!2e0!6m1!1e1
See little strip of concrete leading out to street by the green truck. That's the type of thing the neighbors in St. Paul were complaining about people parking in front of.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 09-23-2014 at 09:03 PM..
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