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Old 10-12-2014, 07:06 PM
 
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[quote=urbanlife78;36853519]If a driver loses control, they would just hit parked cars rather than pedestrians. As for bicyclists, it is important for people to be aware of bikes on the road when they are in cars, parked cars of no parked cars doesn't matter much when it comes to the safety of biking. The truly safest thing for bicyclists is a separate bike lane that doesn't run along side parked cars.


2008: New Bike Lanes in New York City | NYC Bike Maps


Suburban Cycling Could Be Safer - Around Town | Peachtree Corners, Georgia Patch[/QUOTE
]

Yeah but drivers don't loss control that often. If anything the most dangerest things an pedestrian can do is cross the street and walk out between parked cars that is where the vast majority of pedestrian vehicle accidents happen. Also separate bike lanes are much more possible on the kind of wide roads the urbanist hate.
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post

2008: New Bike Lanes in New York City | NYC Bike Maps


Suburban Cycling Could Be Safer - Around Town | Peachtree Corners, Georgia Patch[/QUOTE
]

Yeah but drivers don't loss control that often. If anything the most dangerest things an pedestrian can do is cross the street and walk out between parked cars that is where the vast majority of pedestrian vehicle accidents happen. Also separate bike lanes are much more possible on the kind of wide roads the urbanist hate.
All I am doing is stating a simple point in Urban Planning. Also, urbanists don't hate wide roads when it is used for multiple purposes rather than just for cars.
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
All I am doing is stating a simple point in Urban Planning. Also, urbanists don't hate wide roads when it is used for multiple purposes rather than just for cars.
From this board I would say not. They love tiny roads, small stores, and bad parking all in the name of walk ability. The very things that tend to drive people out to the burbs.

Last edited by nei; 10-13-2014 at 12:31 AM..
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
It takes an complete loss of control to make a car jump an curb and I don't feel safer either way. That being said on street parking is bad for bicyclist. With on street parking there is the danger of running into an door that has been suddenly opened and the danger of getting hit by a car that is pulling out.
Ultimately, it is up to the biker to pay attention and ride with their head UP. Many don't ride with their head UP. We have a race here and every year they have to make an announcement repeatedly to the riders to ride with their heads up. Not sure why this is so difficult for them to understand. Two years ago, one of the riders was looking down at the ground while riding. Guess who rode his bike into an SUV and died from his injuries? Ding ding ding. The biker. Sadly, this type of accident is very common in this race. I also see many bikers on the various roads where I live who never seem to look up. What is so exciting about the ground? It will not run you over, but that big rig coming down a hill will.
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
You can get run over on the sidewalk if a car jumps the curb and there are no parked cars to create a safe buffer.

Try walking next to a busy road with no parallel parking and see how safe you feel, then walk on a sidewalk with parked cars separating you from moving cars and tell me how safe you feel then.

This is just a simple urban planning 101 design.
You can get run over on the sidewalk if a car jumps the curb and there are cars parked to create a buffer. My mom had her car parked on the street and a drunk plowed into it, dragged the car up the curb over the sidewalk and 20 feet down the road before stopping. You could also be swallowed up in a sink hole. What's much more likely, however, is that you'll be hit crossing the street.

I'm used to walking on busy streets with no parallel parking so it's completely safe to me. Not very pleasant, but I'm not worried about sink holes swallowing me up.
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,057 posts, read 16,066,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
If a driver loses control, they would just hit parked cars rather than pedestrians. As for bicyclists, it is important for people to be aware of bikes on the road when they are in cars, parked cars of no parked cars doesn't matter much when it comes to the safety of biking. The truly safest thing for bicyclists is a separate bike lane that doesn't run along side parked cars.


2008: New Bike Lanes in New York City | NYC Bike Maps


Suburban Cycling Could Be Safer - Around Town | Peachtree Corners, Georgia Patch
I like the second picture with the pedestrian jaywalking in the middle of the street a few feet from cars moving at speed. My guess is he'd be scared of walking on a sidewalk
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post

From this board I would say not. They love tiny roads, small stores, and bad parking all in the name of walk ability. The very things that tend to drive people out to the burbs.
Well on this board, I an urbanist, is saying wide roads are good when they provide more than one function for just cars. If a wide road has bike lanes, a couple car lanes, and even a streetcar line on it, that is a good thing for providing avenues to help people commute through different forms of transportation.
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
I like the second picture with the pedestrian jaywalking in the middle of the street a few feet from cars moving at speed. My guess is he'd be scared of walking on a sidewalk
Can't say, the cars look like they are stopped. He could be walking up to the van to ask for change because he is homeless. But then again without knowing what is going on, we could make up any story we want. It isn't really relevant because the picture is about the bike lane, not the random person in the photo.
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Ultimately, it is up to the biker to pay attention and ride with their head UP. Many don't ride with their head UP. We have a race here and every year they have to make an announcement repeatedly to the riders to ride with their heads up. Not sure why this is so difficult for them to understand. Two years ago, one of the riders was looking down at the ground while riding. Guess who rode his bike into an SUV and died from his injuries? Ding ding ding. The biker. Sadly, this type of accident is very common in this race. I also see many bikers on the various roads where I live who never seem to look up. What is so exciting about the ground? It will not run you over, but that big rig coming down a hill will.
I am a very alert bicyclist and always assume no one else can see me when I am on my bike and ride accordingly. I personally wish more people biked like how I biked. I also wish people drove more like how I drove. I don't speed, I don't run red lights, I stop for stop signs and pedestrians crossing the street.
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Old 10-13-2014, 12:39 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, the forum in general is limited to the US b/c most of us have little experience with other cities, although I enjoy reading about what's happening in other countries. Each country has its own culture; it's hard to say that what works here would work in say, France or Romania or wherever. The thread title is very general. It sounded to me that it was a "general US" type of question.
I'm more familiar with the UK than many regions of the country, I didn't realize this was true of most posters. Many have done study abroad, though that might give limited perspective.

Although in some sense, what works in most of Denver might not work in Boston, so there are some similarities even if the culture is the same. I take these threads more as different ways cities can be, though this was more "general US".
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