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Old 09-22-2014, 04:32 PM
 
Location: The City
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generally the market should dictate
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Old 09-22-2014, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stateofnature View Post
If the parking is as big of a problem as you say, sounds like there is a great economic opportunity to be made for a commercial garage owner in this town. I would ask what kind of barriers are in place that might be stopping somebody from offering paid parking to meet the excess demand.
It's not unheard of. Seattle has parking maximums in the downtown area. You basically have to demonstrate that your building needs more than the otherwise allowed maximum number of parking space. Say an urgent care center that has people getting on/off work when transit isn't running would be an example. If your business model is parking cars, they're just not going to give you a variance to build more than the maximum number of parking spots of zero.
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Old 09-22-2014, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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$2200 to build a parking spot assumes pretty cheap land though, like maybe in typical outer suburb developments. I think in many places, not just really expensive big urban cities, even here in Kitchener-Waterloo, in more central neighbourhoods that you'd want to build apartments in, land is worth about $1 million per acre, and if there's a building on it, which is often the case, usually it would cost upwards of $3 million per acre (building+land). So if you can have 100-150 parking spots per acre, that's $7000-$30000 per space.

$275/month is pretty steep for a parking spot though. It's mostly $100-200/month in Downtown Toronto. $275 seems to suggest it costs about $40-50k to build a parking spot.
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Old 09-22-2014, 05:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
$2200 to build a parking spot assumes pretty cheap land though, like maybe in typical outer suburb developments. I think in many places, not just really expensive big urban cities, even here in Kitchener-Waterloo, in more central neighbourhoods that you'd want to build apartments in, land is worth about $1 million per acre, and if there's a building on it, which is often the case, usually it would cost upwards of $3 million per acre (building+land). So if you can have 100-150 parking spots per acre, that's $7000-$30000 per space.

$275/month is pretty steep for a parking spot though. It's mostly $100-200/month in Downtown Toronto. $275 seems to suggest it costs about $40-50k to build a parking spot.

Dowtown Chicago $275 a month would be average.
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Old 09-22-2014, 05:34 PM
 
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Most american cities are car centric, so parking should be built for an complex. However, the complex can charge for the spot if there property is in demand. I live in DTLA and prefer apts w onsite parking rather trying to park on a offsite garage the many reasons (longer walk, price/spot competition w office workers, safety , security, etc)
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Old 09-22-2014, 05:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
generally the market should dictate
Construction companies don't care about long term consequences, cities do. Here is what the "market" does to the city:

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Old 09-22-2014, 05:40 PM
 
35,108 posts, read 40,257,322 times
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Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Please explain why a resident without a car should pay more.

The same reason I have to pay taxes for public schools when my youngest child is currently 28 years old and none of my children never went to public school.

Last edited by CSD610; 09-22-2014 at 05:53 PM..
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Old 09-22-2014, 05:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 46H View Post
My job includes visiting commercial buildings with medical offices. 90% of the time these offices have zero spots available during normal work hours. In each of these cases the local zoning board has underestimated the parking needs and /or bought the developers reasoning for having what turns out to be too few parking spots on the property.
Let's be clear: estimations will always be wrong to some degree. Government estimations, doubly so. And the reality is that most parking requirements are arbitrary or based on terrible, unreliable data.

More than likely, the problem you face is underpricing of the parking (probably $0, as it's "free" to use). Some people stay too long, meanwhile employees have no incentive to find alternatives. If the choice was between a parking space at work or more money each paycheck, some employees would be incentivized to not drive at all or to carpool.
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Old 09-22-2014, 05:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post

More than likely, the problem you face is underpricing of the parking (probably $0, as it's "free" to use). Some people stay too long, meanwhile employees have no incentive to find alternatives. If the choice was between a parking space at work or more money each paycheck, some employees would be incentivized to not drive at all or to carpool.
Depends on type of work and location of work. Some types of work are an heck of an lot incompatible with mass transit(I once had an job that started at 4 a.m.)
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Old 09-22-2014, 05:48 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,005,842 times
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Depends on type of work and location of work. Some types of work are an heck of an lot incompatible with mass transit(I once had an job that started at 4 a.m.)
Well, s/he was specifically referencing offices, namely medical offices. I was assuming "normal" daytime hours. Your point is totally true, though.
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