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Old 09-25-2014, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,252 posts, read 26,220,119 times
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Thoughts?

How It Begins: Renaming a Neighborhood | LA EASTSIDE
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Old 09-25-2014, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,653,336 times
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There was a mini-debate in the Cleveland forum, earlier this summer, about an area that is now being called--by some--Hinge Town. Hingetown - part of the Ohio City neighborhood

It was already part of the Ohio City neighborhood, but wasn't part of the "cool" section of Ohio City. So, these real estate/marketing people created this name to give the area some cache.
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Old 09-25-2014, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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This video sums it up quite perfectly:
Columbusing: Discovering Things for White People - CollegeHumor Video

It is like a new sport here in Oakland.
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Old 09-25-2014, 04:00 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,953,386 times
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West Hollywood is an actual municipality. You either live it or you don't although I guess you could be in the City of LA and still have a West Hollywood zip code/mailing address.

From the article it's difficult to tell what position the author is actually taking because s/he says that it's a place without a distinct identity (it has several different names) but it's bad because someone who lives there is trying to market a distinct identity for the place.

It's not like people are trying to rename a place with a strong identity here. Places need names and identities. It's how you get attention and resources from your city government.

Also, "discover" doesn't mean what you're trying to make it mean:

dis·cov·er
disˈkəvər
verb
1.
find (something or someone) unexpectedly or in the course of a search.
"firemen discovered a body in the debris"
synonyms: find, locate, come across/upon, stumble on, chance on, light on, bring to light, uncover, unearth, turn up; track down
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Old 09-26-2014, 08:56 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,762 posts, read 54,390,602 times
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The renaming of a "district: or neighborhood is very common as a marketing tool for real estate, or to try and escape negativity when gentrification takes place. It also happens to the names of towns. I remember in 1993 when an unincorporated town in California called "West Pittsburg" (pop. about 20,000) was beginning to experience growth with several new home developments, and the name was changed to Bay Point. A much more marketable name and also avoided the negative connotations of nearby blue collar industrial city Pittsburg. In Michigan, the affluent suburb city of East Detroit was changed to Eastpointe, in 1992. I suppose the change from Pig's Eye to St. Paul Minnesota was for more obvious reasons in the mid 1800s.
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Old 09-26-2014, 12:35 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Hunter S. Thompson proposed to change Aspen's name to "Fat City" in hope it would discourage growth and gentrifiers.

The Battle of Aspen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 09-26-2014, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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District and neighborhood names typically come from real estate investments. There isn't a point in time where we decided no new neighborhood names can be created. As residents change and areas' identities change, there will always be someone trying to sell it as the "next new thing."

I think it is okay for districts and neighborhoods reflect the people who occupy it. Of course while I say this, I have seen some bad attempts at renaming areas, but I have also seen good attempts at renaming areas.
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Old 09-26-2014, 03:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hunter S. Thompson proposed to change Aspen's name to "Fat City" in hope it would discourage growth and gentrifiers.

The Battle of Aspen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Yeah, after he moved there. There are a lot of people in Colorado like that, especially in Boulder.
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Old 09-26-2014, 05:07 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,953,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I think it is okay for districts and neighborhoods reflect the people who occupy it. Of course while I say this, I have seen some bad attempts at renaming areas, but I have also seen good attempts at renaming areas.
There's a neighborhood in Philly that most people now call "Olde Kensington" - it was part of the Kensington Borough before consolidation (back in 1854) and is just north of Northern Liberties and just west of Fishtown.

10-12 years ago enough people were calling it JuNoGi for "Just North of Girard" that it garnered a few articles. It's the dumbest neighborhood name I've heard yet and thankfully, most other people also thought it was dumb.

But there are amorphous parts of South Philly that have only started to take on distinct identities in the last decade (or less) - and in some cases there was a lot of angst around the new names. Passyunk Square, East Passyunk Crossing (EPX), Lower Moyamensing (LoMo), West Passyunk, Newbold, etc all brought about some drama - some more than others.
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Old 09-26-2014, 05:13 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yeah, after he moved there. There are a lot of people in Colorado like that, especially in Boulder.
He was hoping it dissuade a particular type of movers-in, maybe the more moneyed sort.

This would prevent greedheads, land-rapers and other human jackals from capitalizing on the name 'Aspen'.... These swine should be ****, broken, and driven across the land."
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