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Old 10-01-2014, 12:31 PM
 
338 posts, read 364,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eccotecc View Post
How many times do I have to say that the 1 1/2 hour commute was on a bus, and I lived in the city but 5 miles from downtown. Pittsburgh doesn't have residential neighborhoods downtown. The internet and smart phones hadn't been invented when I was riding a bus to work. I rode a bus.
What neighborhood?

And when was this, the 80's?
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Old 10-01-2014, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Here and There
2,538 posts, read 3,386,857 times
Reputation: 3767
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatty5011 View Post
What neighborhood?

And when was this, the 80's?
I'm pretty sure I would have just bought a bike. Or walked. Couldn't have been any slower!!!
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Old 10-01-2014, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
3,396 posts, read 6,215,918 times
Reputation: 3717
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatty5011 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by eccotecc
How many times do I have to say that the 1 1/2 hour commute was on a bus, and I lived in the city but 5 miles from downtown. Pittsburgh doesn't have residential neighborhoods downtown. The internet and smart phones hadn't been invented when I was riding a bus to work. I rode a bus.
What neighborhood?

And when was this, the 80's?
After all these post the OP still hasn't told us what their commute was, and I don't think they're telling the truth. Either their commute was much further than 5 miles, or it took them far less time to make the commute.

Even if someone decides to believe their vague and outlandish commute claims, and as Skyegirl noted, any sane person would find a different mode of transportation (walking or biking) or would move to be closer to work.

There are plenty of residential neighborhoods in Pittsburgh that have less than a 1.5 hour commute to get downtown (and it's hard to believe there are any within city limits that even have that long of a commute). Firstside is the first one that comes to mind for me, and I believe that even qualifies as downtown. I've also traveled from Lawrenceville to downtown on public transportation plenty of times, and it never took me more than 30-40 minutes.
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Old 10-01-2014, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,203 posts, read 103,193,714 times
Reputation: 33255
Quote:
Originally Posted by hurricaneMan1992 View Post
In this day and age, I can take the bus or trolley to Target or any other super market and get a car2go and drive back with a pack (usually 24 rolls) of TP and other pantry/household items I needed. I have in the past taken one of the 12 roll packs on two busses with transfers and didn't get any dirty looks, as it fits fine under the seat. There are cabs too--a couple times a month won't break the bank. Then there are people who own cars but choose to leave them parked except for weekends, evenings, and shopping trips. Do you really think that just because someone doesn't use a car for their daily routine, they must never, every have access to a car, and they have no choice but to carry jumbo packs of 50 rolls of TP on a bike?
I'm guessing you're single.
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Old 10-01-2014, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,744,161 times
Reputation: 7831
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikitakolata View Post
Yes, if you choose your location right, it can be great. My house in the suburbs has a walk score of 85 and our house in the city had a score of 89. But, the places I frequent are closer now (the grocery store and a few restaurants I like). If our house was 2 blocks south of where it is the walk score would be higher than that of our house in the city.
I am not gonna lie, that sounds like a pretty impressive suburb neighborhood. It sounds like you have the best of both worlds, plus easy access into a great city.
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Old 10-01-2014, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,744,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Attrill View Post
After all these post the OP still hasn't told us what their commute was, and I don't think they're telling the truth. Either their commute was much further than 5 miles, or it took them far less time to make the commute.

Even if someone decides to believe their vague and outlandish commute claims, and as Skyegirl noted, any sane person would find a different mode of transportation (walking or biking) or would move to be closer to work.

There are plenty of residential neighborhoods in Pittsburgh that have less than a 1.5 hour commute to get downtown (and it's hard to believe there are any within city limits that even have that long of a commute). Firstside is the first one that comes to mind for me, and I believe that even qualifies as downtown. I've also traveled from Lawrenceville to downtown on public transportation plenty of times, and it never took me more than 30-40 minutes.
I believe what the OP is saying is true, the OP took a bus from the suburbs into downtown and my guess is that it was a very poor bus service that traveled at a slow pace with too many local stops. Suburb to city buses tend to be slow service that doesn't do much to compete with driving.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
3,396 posts, read 6,215,918 times
Reputation: 3717
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I believe what the OP is saying is true, the OP took a bus from the suburbs into downtown and my guess is that it was a very poor bus service that traveled at a slow pace with too many local stops. Suburb to city buses tend to be slow service that doesn't do much to compete with driving.
Sure, I can see someone having a 1.5 hour commute, especially from a suburb - but not for only 5 miles. As I said in my previous post, if the commute was that bad I think the real problems were with the OP not finding an alternative method of transportation or moving to a more convenient location.

I think that every place can have it's time sucks, and you make trade offs based on what's important to you. The vast majority of people, no matter where they live, don't have 1.5 hour commutes. The average is about 30 minutes, and more than 90% of people have commutes of under an hour. That's because because people choose their priorities and live within a reasonable commute time from their jobs. For most people 20-45 minutes seems to be reasonable. In an urban area that amount of time may only get you 10 miles from your home, where it could get you 40 or 50 miles from your home in a rural area.

That said, the benefit of less traffic is usually offset by a much lower density of possible jobs. As I said in a previous post there are at least 600,000 jobs within 45 minutes of my house - that's more than twice the number of jobs in the entire state of Wyoming. Because of the high number of possible jobs nearby, I've haven't had to move even after switching jobs multiple times. The worst commute I've had was a 40 minute commute by bus (Logan Square to Ravenswood).

Anyways, I think the OP's premise is a false one. No matter where people live they generally structure their lives to give themselves so they have a 20-45 minute commute, no matter what distances are involved. You may get around at slower speeds in denser areas, but you'll be traveling shorter distances.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:33 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,558 posts, read 2,932,323 times
Reputation: 4122
So there's no comments on the middle ground between a rural area and urban area... the suburban area? I've been at several and they seem to be a nice compromise:
-5 to 20 minutes away from most staples (food, groceries, Walmart or supplies)
-There's a gamestop, Radio Shack (if you're into these things, but otherwise, a good indicator of an area's basic prominence)
-churches (same as above)
-mass transit into the city as an option
-may have buses around

There are still downsides too, like traffic if you're near a highway, and you still have to drive for almost everything you need.
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Old 10-01-2014, 09:21 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,638,662 times
Reputation: 4053
That "middle ground" is the worst of both worlds. That "5 to 20 minutes away" carries with it the assumption that the 5-20 minute trip is done in a car, as you mentioned, "you still have to drive for almost everything you need." The retail is generally corporate chain retail, rather than local businesses. Mass transit in suburbs is generally limited and difficult to get to, because of the physical layout of autocentric suburbs--their lower density and tendency towards cul-de-sac/feeder street patterns means transit is less efficient in auto suburbs than in higher-density neighborhoods (more people within a short walking distance of a line, more population means lines can be closer together and still carry sufficient customers, gridded streets mean direct walking paths and transit routes vs. meandering paths.)
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Old 10-01-2014, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
3,396 posts, read 6,215,918 times
Reputation: 3717
Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
So there's no comments on the middle ground between a rural area and urban area... the suburban area? I've been at several and they seem to be a nice compromise:
It really depends on the suburb. I think a suburb that has a number of malls and large office parks can have some really crazy traffic. I've had to deal with it going to client meetings in the suburbs of Chicago, working in Natick MA years ago, and driving around Carmel IN while visiting in-laws. Many times I've been on a 3-lane suburban "street" watching the light change 3 or 4 times before I could make a turn. Actually, that's a pretty good summary of many business trips I've taken over the last couple decades.

I think suburbs operate on the same sliding scale that urban and rural areas operate on. The higher the density of office parks, malls, and housing - the greater the traffic will be. There are sleepier suburbs where you'll get more space and have less traffic, but you'll be more likely to have to drive a longer time to get to stores. Here are a couple examples of what I'm talking about...

My sister lives in a suburb East of Tucson, there is only one supermarket and a sports bar within 20 minutes of her, not much else unless you get on the highway and drive for a couple exits (about 30 minutes). She mostly works at home and my brother in law drives over an hour to Bisbee everyday. They have almost no traffic, but also nowhere to go nearby. There are no public transit options at all.

On the other end of the spectrum my BIL and his family live in Carmel IN, and can walk to a few restaurants and stores, and have another dozen or so within a 10 minute drive. His driving commute is about 30 minutes, but is only 5 miles compared to the 70 or so my other BIL drives in an hour or so.
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