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Old 10-01-2014, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
That "middle ground" is the worst of both worlds. That "5 to 20 minutes away" carries with it the assumption that the 5-20 minute trip is done in a car, as you mentioned, "you still have to drive for almost everything you need." The retail is generally corporate chain retail, rather than local businesses. Mass transit in suburbs is generally limited and difficult to get to, because of the physical layout of autocentric suburbs--their lower density and tendency towards cul-de-sac/feeder street patterns means transit is less efficient in auto suburbs than in higher-density neighborhoods (more people within a short walking distance of a line, more population means lines can be closer together and still carry sufficient customers, gridded streets mean direct walking paths and transit routes vs. meandering paths.)
Argument by assertion - RationalWiki

Since you are speaking for all suburbs of all cities, as you didn't qualify your statement, I'm calling you on this. It's untrue, no matter how many times you repeat it.

Not everyone is a big fan of grids, either.
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Old 10-01-2014, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,744,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Argument by assertion - RationalWiki

Since you are speaking for all suburbs of all cities, as you didn't qualify your statement, I'm calling you on this. It's untrue, no matter how many times you repeat it.

Not everyone is a big fan of grids, either.
In a general sense it is true, I am sure there are some suburbs that do have good transit, but most do not.
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Old 10-02-2014, 06:21 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,366,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Argument by assertion - RationalWiki

Since you are speaking for all suburbs of all cities, as you didn't qualify your statement, I'm calling you on this. It's untrue, no matter how many times you repeat it.
It's true in my experience, at least in suburbs I'm familiar with. And no, Louisville doesn't appear that different from some areas of Long Island transit-wise. Obviously, there isn't some sudden drop when passing the city limits, but generally transit service and usefulness declines going outward, till at some point it's rather limited. Especially for non-downtown trips.

Last edited by nei; 10-02-2014 at 06:30 AM..
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:13 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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I don't think this is a hidden major cost of living in an urban environment, because this doesn't seem specific to an urban environment so much as it is specific to one's personal situation. You can live in the heart of the city and have your workplace be within minutes of your home by walking or biking while also having grocery stores, restaurants, entertainment of sorts, etc. all within that time span as well.

You can also live in the boonies and have to commute in heavy traffic to your place of work, have to drive fifteen minutes and then park just to buy some basic goods, and go out even further if you wanted to go see a play or go to a concert or a nice restaurant.
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Oceania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post

Also, not every situation is the same. I have a friend that lives in rural Virginia and we use to joke that it was an hour to anything because often times to do anything, it did take at least an hour to get there. So it really depends on your situation.
What can't you do at home which demands driving an hour to do? City folks who can't take the country and need to get to a city and feel comforable?
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:29 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,638,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
What can't you do at home which demands driving an hour to do? City folks who can't take the country and need to get to a city and feel comforable?
Work? Buying things? Selling things? Visiting other people?
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
What can't you do at home which demands driving an hour to do? City folks who can't take the country and need to get to a city and feel comforable?
Well if you wanted to see a movie, or shop at a mall, of visit a friend. Everyone always seemed to live almost an hour away from each other. Heck, we use to play paintball and to go to a few places we played at it was typically an hour away.

It isn't an exaggeration, it was just a way of life in rural Cirginia. You didn't need to drive that far everyday...Though my friend did live a good distance from work. I can't remember how long but I know it was over a half hour just in distance between the two towns.
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:58 PM
 
2,235 posts, read 2,395,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Attrill View Post
Sure, I can see someone having a 1.5 hour commute, especially from a suburb - but not for only 5 miles. As I said in my previous post, if the commute was that bad I think the real problems were with the OP not finding an alternative method of transportation or moving to a more convenient location.

I think that every place can have it's time sucks, and you make trade offs based on what's important to you. The vast majority of people, no matter where they live, don't have 1.5 hour commutes. The average is about 30 minutes, and more than 90% of people have commutes of under an hour. That's because because people choose their priorities and live within a reasonable commute time from their jobs. For most people 20-45 minutes seems to be reasonable. In an urban area that amount of time may only get you 10 miles from your home, where it could get you 40 or 50 miles from your home in a rural area.

That said, the benefit of less traffic is usually offset by a much lower density of possible jobs. As I said in a previous post there are at least 600,000 jobs within 45 minutes of my house - that's more than twice the number of jobs in the entire state of Wyoming. Because of the high number of possible jobs nearby, I've haven't had to move even after switching jobs multiple times. The worst commute I've had was a 40 minute commute by bus (Logan Square to Ravenswood).

Anyways, I think the OP's premise is a false one. No matter where people live they generally structure their lives to give themselves so they have a 20-45 minute commute, no matter what distances are involved. You may get around at slower speeds in denser areas, but you'll be traveling shorter distances.
Attrill,

I'm sorry I hadn't replied sooner but I was in transit from California to Pittsburgh. You seem to be familiar with Pittsburgh.

You were wondering where I was commuting from. I was living in Swissvale and commuting into downtown Pittsburgh to work. The bus route was through the squirrel hill tunnels and the parkway. Have you ever driven on the parkway during commute times and had to go through the squirrel hill tunnels? If you have then you wouldn't be questioning what I'm saying.

It's easy to suggest moving closer, but a young person starting out lives where they can afford to live. I was lucky to have a job and to be able to buy a house at the time. I'm sorry but it's really ignorant of you to think I wasn't being truthful let alone post it. I did do something at the time, I left Pittsburgh and moved to California.

BTW...Swissvale isn't 5 miles, it's 7 miles. My mistake...

Last edited by eccotecc; 10-02-2014 at 05:15 PM..
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Old 10-02-2014, 05:43 PM
 
2,235 posts, read 2,395,686 times
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Here are some facts.

Longest Commutes: U.S. Cities - Bloomberg Best (and Worst)

The Cities With The Most Extreme Commutes - Forbes
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Old 10-02-2014, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,744,161 times
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Seeing the OP bought a house when living in Pittsburgh, that sounds like the OP sacrificed commute time to be a home owner, there is nothing wrong with that. It is just a distance someone has to deal with when deciding where to live. How far from work does one want to live and commute when it comes to the living conditions one wants to have.
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