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Old 10-02-2014, 08:05 PM
 
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Here's something to enlighten you about Pittsburgh traffic which is not much different then other major cities.

Hitting the brakes for Pittsburgh’s worst traffic nightmares | Trib List

http://www.tripnet.org/docs/PA_Fores...tch_062113.pdf

Last edited by eccotecc; 10-02-2014 at 08:18 PM..
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Old 10-02-2014, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,499,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eccotecc View Post
Here's something to enlighten you about Pittsburgh traffic which is not much different then other major cities.

Hitting the brakes for Pittsburgh’s worst traffic nightmares | Trib List
If you were there today, it looks like this would have fixed your problem with commute time.

Martin Luther King Jr. East Busway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It looks like the East Busway would have turned your trip into 22 minutes from Swissvale Station A to the Amtrak Station downtown.
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Old 10-02-2014, 08:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
It's true in my experience, at least in suburbs I'm familiar with. And no, Louisville doesn't appear that different from some areas of Long Island transit-wise. Obviously, there isn't some sudden drop when passing the city limits, but generally transit service and usefulness declines going outward, till at some point it's rather limited. Especially for non-downtown trips.
A blanket statement such as "Mass transit in suburbs is generally limited and difficult to get to" is meaningless. Every city I am familiar with has a transit system that takes in the suburbs. In Pittsburgh, the Port Authority Transit covers all of Allegheny County, of which Pittsburgh is, geographically, a small part (58 sq. mi in a county of 730 sq. miles). It also has some interface with the Beaver County transit system. In Denver, the Regional Transit District takes in all of the City and County of Denver; all of the City and County of Broomfield, the urbanized parts of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Douglas and Jefferson Counties, including the mountain communities of Evergreen, Conifer, and Nederland, and the Eldora ski area near Nederland, and a small part of Weld County. It goes well into the mountainous areas of Boulder and Jefferson Counties. Broomfield, Boulder, Douglas and Weld Counties don't even have a contiguous border with Denver. Boulder and Weld aren't even part of the MSA. The suburbs are the biggest beneficiaries of light rail. The early lines went deep into the bowels of Douglas County, to that root of all evils suburbs Highlands Ranch. (It has been discussed and debased on this board.) The most recent line goes west into Jefferson County to Golden. The Metra in Chicago goes to the Wisconsin border and into Indiana. The Long Island Railroad has long provided transit to NYC.

Most trips in "the cities" are downtown-oriented as well.

System Map - Port Authority of Allegheny County - System Overview
RTD
Schedule & Fare Finder
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
A blanket statement such as "Mass transit in suburbs is generally limited and difficult to get to" is meaningless. Every city I am familiar with has a transit system that takes in the suburbs. In Pittsburgh, the Port Authority Transit covers all of Allegheny County, of which Pittsburgh is, geographically, a small part (58 sq. mi in a county of 730 sq. miles). It also has some interface with the Beaver County transit system. In Denver, the Regional Transit District takes in all of the City and County of Denver; all of the City and County of Broomfield, the urbanized parts of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Douglas and Jefferson Counties, including the mountain communities of Evergreen, Conifer, and Nederland, and the Eldora ski area near Nederland, and a small part of Weld County. It goes well into the mountainous areas of Boulder and Jefferson Counties. Broomfield, Boulder, Douglas and Weld Counties don't even have a contiguous border with Denver. Boulder and Weld aren't even part of the MSA. The suburbs are the biggest beneficiaries of light rail. The early lines went deep into the bowels of Douglas County, to that root of all evils suburbs Highlands Ranch. (It has been discussed and debased on this board.) The most recent line goes west into Jefferson County to Golden. The Metra in Chicago goes to the Wisconsin border and into Indiana. The Long Island Railroad has long provided transit to NYC.

Most trips in "the cities" are downtown-oriented as well.

System Map - Port Authority of Allegheny County - System Overview
RTD
Schedule & Fare Finder
So you rely on cherry picking for this post? Should I start picking suburban areas that have poor transit to counter this?

Allegheny County is a tough one, just looking at the transit map, I see plenty of areas in the outer suburban areas not touched by bus, but on the other hand Pittsburgh has a very hilly terrain that tends to work against itself and could make it hard to run buses everywhere.
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:32 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
A blanket statement such as "Mass transit in suburbs is generally limited and difficult to get to" is meaningless. Every city I am familiar with has a transit system that takes in the suburbs.
Yes, I know suburbs have transit, I grew up in suburbs. That doesn't mean their coverage, or frequency is particularly good. The LIRR mostly falls under the "difficult to get to" category, many if not most are not in reasonable walking distance.
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Old 10-02-2014, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
3,396 posts, read 6,178,700 times
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Originally Posted by eccotecc View Post
Attrill,
You were wondering where I was commuting from. I was living in Swissvale and commuting into downtown Pittsburgh to work. The bus route was through the squirrel hill tunnels and the parkway. Have you ever driven on the parkway during commute times and had to go through the squirrel hill tunnels? If you have then you wouldn't be questioning what I'm saying.

It's easy to suggest moving closer, but a young person starting out lives where they can afford to live. I was lucky to have a job and to be able to buy a house at the time. I'm sorry but it's really ignorant of you to think I wasn't being truthful let alone post it. I did do something at the time, I left Pittsburgh and moved to California.
Thanks for posting where you were commuting from, that makes it much easier to have a discussion about this. I'm sure Swissvale would be one of the more difficult commutes to make on public transit in Pittsburgh, but I think using that commute (especially from 20-30 years ago) as the foundation to make the assertion you made is a real stretch, and I don't agree with your conclusion. Additionally, my personal experience has been the opposite.

As I've said repeatedly in this thread, I think it comes down to people making choices. While your priority was to buy a place while you were young, I'm sure there were plenty of students at Duquesne who were renting places at very affordable rates within a 30 minute walk of downtown at the same time you chose to buy a place far from downtown. That was a choice you made - longer commute (of whatever length) in exchange for the opportunity to buy at a price you could afford.

I can understand the desire to buy, I have two good friends who bought places in Pittsburgh in the late 80's, and that's worked out very well for them today. At the same time they bought places with a reasonable commute time to their jobs, and would not have bought where they did if the commute had been 1.5 hours.
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Old 10-03-2014, 02:00 AM
 
1,723 posts, read 1,631,640 times
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Originally Posted by eccotecc View Post
I think of all the lost time that is spent waiting for buses, waiting in traffic, waiting in lines at checkout stands, waiting to get into a park or sports arena, driving around looking for a place to park. I'm sure many can think of other time robbers.
Huh? Is this a joke? Are you talking about a cruddy, sprawly sunbelt city or something? Otherwise, how on earth could your transit time be longer if you already live in the city/job core? I, and millions more, pay a huge premium to live in the middle of the city because it's, obviously, a TIME SAVER. My commute is a 7 minute walk instead of my old 45 minute+ commute in from the suburbs via car (or longer when there's traffic, obviously). When needed, I stop in at the grocery store that's a block away from my home - takes me no time at all. Compare that to getting into a car, driving to a strip mall, parking, etc. Ditto for anytime I want to go out to eat - I live within a quarter mile of dozens of restaurants. Compare that to the standard suburban area where you have to get into a car and drive for 15 minutes even to get to the closest cruddy chain restaurant. OP is totally nuts and, apparently, has never been to a real city.
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Old 10-03-2014, 02:03 AM
 
1,723 posts, read 1,631,640 times
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Originally Posted by eccotecc View Post
Here's something to enlighten you about Pittsburgh traffic which is not much different then other major cities.

Hitting the brakes for Pittsburgh’s worst traffic nightmares | Trib List

http://www.tripnet.org/docs/PA_Fores...tch_062113.pdf
Exactly. Hence why living in the suburbs and commuting through all that mess is a complete time-suck. Living in the city itself can and does save hours of time every day.
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Old 10-03-2014, 11:28 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Originally Posted by bufflove View Post
Huh? Is this a joke? Are you talking about a cruddy, sprawly sunbelt city or something? Otherwise, how on earth could your transit time be longer if you already live in the city/job core? I, and millions more, pay a huge premium to live in the middle of the city because it's, obviously, a TIME SAVER. My commute is a 7 minute walk instead of my old 45 minute+ commute in from the suburbs via car (or longer when there's traffic, obviously). When needed, I stop in at the grocery store that's a block away from my home - takes me no time at all. Compare that to getting into a car, driving to a strip mall, parking, etc. Ditto for anytime I want to go out to eat - I live within a quarter mile of dozens of restaurants. Compare that to the standard suburban area where you have to get into a car and drive for 15 minutes even to get to the closest cruddy chain restaurant. OP is totally nuts and, apparently, has never been to a real city.
Have you not been following? S/he is talking about Pittsburgh!

Quote:
Originally Posted by bufflove View Post
Exactly. Hence why living in the suburbs and commuting through all that mess is a complete time-suck. Living in the city itself can and does save hours of time every day.
Depends on where the job is. Mine is in the burbs.
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Old 10-03-2014, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,499,569 times
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Depends on where the job is. Mine is in the burbs.
True, it does depend on where one has their job. It makes no sense to live in the city if you work in the suburbs, and it makes no sense to complain about the commute times when living in the suburbs and working downtown.

Of course in the case of the OP, where he once lived now has a busway stop that basically reduces the commute time in half.
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