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Old 09-28-2014, 09:02 PM
 
3,097 posts, read 3,203,161 times
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This sounds like a variation of Yossarian's theory in Catch 22 'To make life last longer you should do things you don't like because time goes slower then'
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Old 09-28-2014, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
4,023 posts, read 3,270,979 times
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OP's onto something, from one point of view. Others have pointed out the flaw in the argument, too, that primarily being economics.

I live in a place, suburbia (Eastside), in a town with legendary bad traffic (metro Seattle). I'm struck by what I "can't" do: can't go here, there, or other places during the week. Just isn't going to happen: not much parking, and sometimes genuinely-nuts traffic jams that can tie you up for an hour and a half. Fortunately, where I'm based has tons to do. I just try and do most of it on-foot during the week, to avoid traffic ruckus.

Constraint, thus, is to live near your work. Jobs never last all that long anymore, so that's a risk. But the economic payoff is quite substantial.

On the weekends, you can go there. Wherever there is. Still, I take the bus when I can, to avoid the ruckus of bridge tolls, parking and etc. I wouldn't go within a mile of the football or baseball stadium during games, by car: that's what buses are for. Fantastic place to live, if it appeals to a particular person's sensibilities.

But really, on retirement, I might just flee the place due to cost and dealing with people.

Not sure what "wait times" there are, other than that. Costco is two miles down the street, QFC and similar one mile away. They're not super-busy, usually, though depends on the day. I don't wait for anything too long in such a town within a town (Kirkland, WA in my case). I've never, not once, been crowded out of a restaurant or store. Oh, possible exception being a fantastic diner on one side of town that gets too busy on the weekends. Solution there is to go early, of course. Or to other places.

Gateway to Yosemite means Mariposa or someplace like that: small, quiet, very little economic opportunity to make serious money. I'm not into "just getting by," if that's what is required to live there. The lifestyle does impress, though, and some souls are simply not made for living in dense urban environments.
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Old 09-28-2014, 10:51 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,099,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
An hour and a half to travel 5 miles? That sounds like an awful place to live if the traffic is that bad. Also, I am guessing that it wasn't cost effective to live closer to your work in a large urban area? If time is money, then paying more to live closer to work is a valuable choice.

Also, not every situation is the same. I have a friend that lives in rural Virginia and we use to joke that it was an hour to anything because often times to do anything, it did take at least an hour to get there. So it really depends on your situation.

It sounds like you moved from a place you didn't like to a place you like and your commute has shortened greatly. My wife and I lived a couple years in the NYC metro, it took three trains, a long walk to get to transit, and about an hour to an hour and a half to commute about 7 miles. Now we moved back to Portland, our hometown, and I live about 7 miles from work again, it takes about 15-20 minutes by car, 35-45 minutes by bike or transit to get downtown, so we have greatly improved our living conditions by moving to a smaller city that matches our needs.

I've got one better than that...this was a gig I found on Craigslist; could have lasted months or years if I had wanted...

Start at 136 & Foster in SE Portland. End three blocks off TV Hwy in Hillsboro.

Took just about two hours each way by bus; that's four hours round-trip travel.

One week of that was enough for me.

At least in NYC Metro you can get pretty much anywhere by transit. Subway got me from anywhere in NYC to Washington Heights (Port Authority bus terminal, Take the A Train) and then a short speedy bus ride dropped me off in Ridgewood six blocks from my aunt and uncle. Train works for that as well.
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Old 09-28-2014, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,714,577 times
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You can waste time in any sized metro. Compact development, no matter the environment is good for everyone.

I spent the weekend in one of the places I grew up in. I forgot how much time we spent in the car. You have to drive everywhere. My aunt lives in one town and my uncle lives around 12 miles from her. My aunt lives about 2 miles from the grocery store. And there are a few on route to my uncle's place. The best entertainment (and density of destinations) is roughly 20 miles from my aunt's place. Everyone thinks nothing of driving all these distances all the time, even a few times a day! It was torture for me to do so much driving. And i couldn't even walk or bike to the grocery or coffee shop if I wanted. There is no sidewalk on the main road, a really small shoulder and traffic is going 45-55mph. There are some multi-use trails but they are scenic not transportation.

For me the semi-rural beach town life would be torture due to the car oriented layout, and far distances.
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Old 09-28-2014, 11:29 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,507 posts, read 2,890,589 times
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Tradeoffs abound.

I knew someone who bought a 500 sq ft studio in Manhattan for $500K (with help from family). Go just a bit outside, you can get more than twice the space for more than half that price. However, his place is very brand new (2007-ish IIRC), and is in the heart of Manhattan where he can now walk to work, and to most stores and amenities without having to take the subway. Even if he had to take the subway, it's still a relatively short trip. The commute from his home in NJ was killing him.

I agree that for some folks, the job opportunities in a city are very good and hard to pass up. if you're well compensated for it, you can use the extra money to buy GOOD FOOD or hire someone to do it for you. If you're that well off, you don't have to suffer through fast food.

Others just choose not to go into the city. Someone commutes from the suburbs of Maryland into the edge of it. Not bad. He refuses to go into DC b/c that would add an hour to his commute either way.
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Old 09-29-2014, 06:23 AM
 
Location: USA
6,226 posts, read 5,372,022 times
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With the internet and telecommuting you're really not as car dependent as you may have been in the past if you live in a small town of rural area. You can work a high paying big city type job right from home, order almost everything you want from Amazon, etc. You can also get more bang for your buck and save way more for retirement.

There isn't nearly as much crime in big cities as there used to be. Through gentrification the 'undesirables" are being pushed out to small towns and rural areas. There was a lot of crime and drug issues in the small town I grew up. When you're poor and have nothing to do crime and drug use will follow.

I, personally prefer the city because I love the energy, the amenities, etc. Where I grew up you were on food stamps and welfare unless you commuted 1:30 2hrs everyday. Nothing to do but hang out at the local chain grocery store.

Unless you live in a small town/rurual area that still has industry supporting it, or has a rich farming community, or unless you can telecommute they just aren't very viable places to live today.
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Old 09-29-2014, 06:33 AM
 
15,740 posts, read 9,268,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
I've got one better than that...this was a gig I found on Craigslist; could have lasted months or years if I had wanted...

Start at 136 & Foster in SE Portland. End three blocks off TV Hwy in Hillsboro.

Took just about two hours each way by bus; that's four hours round-trip travel.

One week of that was enough for me.

At least in NYC Metro you can get pretty much anywhere by transit. Subway got me from anywhere in NYC to Washington Heights (Port Authority bus terminal, Take the A Train) and then a short speedy bus ride dropped me off in Ridgewood six blocks from my aunt and uncle. Train works for that as well.
Every working person faces those choices, even if you don't rely on public transportation. When I first moved to Texas, I interviewed for a great job that I would have really enjoyed. The downside is that the commute would have been 1.5 hours in each direction, with typical traffic. I had the choice of moving, enduring the commute or finding another job. I chose to find another job.

But I'm not the type of person that thinks there's only ONE job out there that's perfect for me.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:18 AM
 
Location: NYC
12,963 posts, read 8,783,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eccotecc View Post
Time...How much time is lost living in a major urban city? If time is money, how much does it cost in lost time to live in a city?

I think of all the lost time that is spent waiting for buses, waiting in traffic, waiting in lines at checkout stands, waiting to get into a park or sports arena, driving around looking for a place to park. I'm sure many can think of other time robbers.

If money is lost or stolen, it can always be replaced. Lost time however, can never be replaced, it's gone forever.

If a person where to take their weekly hours of lost time and multiply it by their hourly wage, how much is it costing a person in lost time waiting in lines?

It's something to think about if a person is living in a city or planning to move to one.
I used to live in NYC for 20+ yrs and moved to the suburbs and stayed there for 8 yrs+

A few things not mentioned is the lost of time due to service delays. I often spend maybe 10-45mins every 2-3 days just looking for a spot to park my car due to alternate side parking rules. If you don't have a car you are delayed by mass transit delays.

Often people rush to eat food in NYC because they are afraid the parking meter is running out of time or they parked somewhere that maybe risky to park.

Another problem is that public facilities such as govt offices and hospitals are so swamped with people I lost countless days just going to some offices to renew my licenses or just to get a simple check up that look hours because there's too much people.

Now I live in the suburbs my hospital visits are quicker as they are rarely full or packed with uninsured patients.

DMV visits aren't as bad as NYC, still lots of people but not as bad as some places in NYC.

If you do want to live in an urban place, be prepared to bring something to read. It's gonna be a long wait just about everywhere.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:41 AM
 
3,567 posts, read 2,377,425 times
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The suburbs are really the home of the time sink. They're designed to force everyone to drive through terrible traffic everywhere they go. Urban areas should allow people to walk to many destinations or take effective public transit. Rural areas have very little competition and the low price to enable living in the ideal location. Of course, particular urban and rural areas can suck in various ways due to poor planning, but "poor urban planning is bad" isn't really revelatory.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,310,229 times
Reputation: 10428
I personally view time in my car as my biggest "life waster". I'm currently spending about 1.5 hours per day driving to/from work, and that's going from more urban to a very suburban location.

Lines are no issue in stores. The issue is trying to live as close as possible to everything you need.
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