U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-30-2014, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,519,126 times
Reputation: 7830

Advertisements

If you have a freezer and lots of storage you might be able to buy a month worth of groceries. My wife and I do Costco once a month, the Farmers Market once a week for produce, the grocery store once a week for meats and stuff, and then we have an organic grocery store that is extremely easy for me to run to on bike if we need anything for dinner that we don't have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-30-2014, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,287,116 times
Reputation: 3827
I live in a very dense 1st ring suburb. We have two grocery stores within half a mile, and two costcos within 4 miles of our house. We do the Costco run once a month or so, but mostly use it to buy non-perishable items. We do major grocery shopping once or week or so to stock up on stuff (by car), but then I always find myself running out to the store every other day for random things. For these random trips, I often (but not always) walk or bike so I get some exercise and maybe a cup of coffee along the way (Starbucks plus several other cafes line the route) to the grocery store.

If we were better planners perhaps we could get away with shopping once a month, but that's just not the way our family operates. Some people would say that its a waste of time, but I say its cheaper than a gym membership, and definitely more scenic than a treadmill. Also, our cars will last forever, and we spend minimal amounts on gasoline.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2014, 09:45 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,001 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I certainly don't buy a pack of 50 rolls of toilet paper, that's a bit much. Don't want to devote my home to be a storage yard.

And yes, I do shop in the cold, rain and snow. There things called coats, rain jackets and umbrellas to deal with such weather. And driving in the snow can be as bad or worse than walking in the snow, I used to walk more when it was snowy. I find this fear of the weather mentioned on the forum rather strange. I did a morning shopping trip on foot, it looked like it was about to rain so I was going to bring my rain jacket, but it wasn't raining.

Can you really plan all your grocery shopping needs in just two shopping trips a month?
No, but I can keep it down to once a week. This was the case even when I was shopping for four people. Do we make "emergency" trips? Yes, but not often.

I find this fear of consolidating shopping trips, and this love of going to grocery stores mentioned on this forum rather strange. Of course, most on this forum are only shopping for one or two people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2014, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,519,126 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
No, but I can keep it down to once a week. This was the case even when I was shopping for four people. Do we make "emergency" trips? Yes, but not often.

I find this fear of consolidating shopping trips, and this love of going to grocery stores mentioned on this forum rather strange. Of course, most on this forum are only shopping for one or two people.
I am not sure where you get this idea that people have a "fear" of consolidating shopping trips...as a matter of fact, that is a common practice for urban planning where it encourages one to do many things on one trip rather than have to make several trips to several places.

Also, using a car to go grocery shopping is something most people do, but as you point out that you only go grocery shopping once a week, then by that example, you only need your car once a week to go grocery shopping if you were one of those people that commuted by bike, walking, or transit like some people on this forum do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2014, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,275 posts, read 4,767,968 times
Reputation: 4041
I can see the OP's point. I have more time now that I moved to a suburb than I did living in the City. Even though I'm 13 miles farther away, my commute time hasn't changed because the commuter rail is faster and I live closer to it. My wait times in line at the grocery store are much less now because the store is less crowded. Traffic near my house is also much lighter so getting to the grocery store, hardware store, or mall takes much less time.

The trade-off is that I can only walk to 5 bars now instead of 15. I've only got 15 options on Grub Hub instead of the 300 I had in the city. Those trade-offs do not bother me one bit. I will never move back to the city. But, the key is finding the right balance. Generally my life feels easier and more convenient where I am now, even though the city is supposed to be superior for a walking lifestyle and my job was so much closer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2014, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,519,126 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikitakolata View Post
I can see the OP's point. I have more time now that I moved to a suburb than I did living in the City. Even though I'm 13 miles farther away, my commute time hasn't changed because the commuter rail is faster and I live closer to it. My wait times in line at the grocery store are much less now because the store is less crowded. Traffic near my house is also much lighter so getting to the grocery store, hardware store, or mall takes much less time.

The trade-off is that I can only walk to 5 bars now instead of 15. I've only got 15 options on Grub Hub instead of the 300 I had in the city. Those trade-offs do not bother me one bit. I will never move back to the city. But, the key is finding the right balance. Generally my life feels easier and more convenient where I am now, even though the city is supposed to be superior for a walking lifestyle and my job was so much closer.
That is one of the things that really impresses me with Chicago and Chicagoland is the number of little urban centers near the commuter rail making it easier to live out of the city, still get some urban walkability, easy access into downtown, without having to deal with high density neighborhoods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2014, 12:08 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is one of the things that really impresses me with Chicago and Chicagoland is the number of little urban centers near the commuter rail making it easier to live out of the city, still get some urban walkability, easy access into downtown, without having to deal with high density neighborhoods.
Isn't the NYC area similar in that regard?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2014, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,519,126 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Isn't the NYC area similar in that regard?
It is in some sense, but for some reason I feel like commuting in NYC was harder because it took much longer to do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2014, 12:32 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,001 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I am not sure where you get this idea that people have a "fear" of consolidating shopping trips...as a matter of fact, that is a common practice for urban planning where it encourages one to do many things on one trip rather than have to make several trips to several places.

Also, using a car to go grocery shopping is something most people do, but as you point out that you only go grocery shopping once a week, then by that example, you only need your car once a week to go grocery shopping if you were one of those people that commuted by bike, walking, or transit like some people on this forum do.
This board is where I got this idea, but we can't "dredge up old posts", even of people currently posting here. I recall someone saying they worked at home and therefore liked to hit the grocery store daily for a cup of coffee, which I can totally understand. But someone remarked about how sad it was (or words to that effect) that some people had to buy in bulk, only shop once a week, etc. Of course, the stores love it if you go more often, b/c most frequently make some impulse buys (stuff you weren't planning to buy).

People may be using their cars for things other than shopping during the week, even if they do take another form of transportation to work. For ex, they may drive their kids to school or day care, they may drive to the gym, to social activities.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 09-30-2014 at 12:43 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2014, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,519,126 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
This board is where I got this idea, but we can't "dredge up old posts", even of people currently posting here. I recall someone saying they worked at home and therefore liked to hit the grocery store daily for a cup of coffee, which I can totally understand. But someone remarked about how sad it was (or words to that effect) that some people had to buy in bulk, only shop once a week, etc. Of course, the stores love it if you go more often, b/c most frequently make some impulse buys (stuff you weren't planning to buy).

People may be using their cars for things other than shopping during the week, even if they do take another form of transportation to work. For ex, they may drive their kids to school or day care, they may drive to the gym, to social activities.
And then there are people who are able to walk their children to day care, able to walk to the gym, and able to do social activities in walking distance of their home because all of those amenities are within walking distance to where they live.

I think you might have been misreading posts if you think people find it "sad" that others only grocery shop once a week. I personally try not to go grocery shopping every day, that would be a waste of time if I don't need to, but that doesn't mean I can't live within walking and biking distance to a number of amenities like you just listed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top