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Old 10-03-2014, 09:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
I would say that Longueuil and maybe a few of the adjacent suburbs like Saint-Lambert and Le Moyne could be considered more inner ring than Laval.

Using the whole island as inner ring makes things simple, but those areas are pretty varied. Although the West Island communities were built up at a similar time to those in North/East, they are pretty different in built form and socio-economically. West Island is mostly low density SFH and upper middle class, while the other post-WWII communities in the middle (Saint Laurent and Lasalle) and Northeast of the island are more lower middle class and quite dense.
Yeah, maybe Laval doesn't qualify or Longueuil and St. Lambert should qualify.

It's true the suburbs take different forms and there are class differences, but usually the inner ring is very diverse. It often includes adjacent older industrial cities, old money suburbs, 50s/60s suburbs etc. Yonkers and Nassau County are pretty different as well.
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Old 10-09-2014, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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I would say as a rule of thumb that places in SEPTA regional rail fare zone 2 that are not within the city limits are inner ring suburbs of Philadelphia, at least on the PA side.
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Old 10-09-2014, 02:08 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Denver has this little dogleg off to the northeast to the airport, but other than that it's fairly rectangular, not round. Inner-ring suburbs from the northwest, clockwise-unincorporated Adams County, Commerce City, Aurora, unincorporated Arapahoe County, Greenwood Village, Cherry Hills Village, Englewood, Littleton, unincorporated Jefferson County, Lakewood, Wheat Ridge.
Denver Relocation Map For City and Suburbs

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 10-09-2014 at 02:23 PM..
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Old 10-09-2014, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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In the eastern part of the bay area, the inner ring is bounded by the "hills." Berkeley, Alameda, Albany, Richmond, El Cerrito, Hayward, San Leandro and San Lorenzo. The 1st four cities have more older housing: victorians and craftsmans. And then typical ranch homes and 50s era development. The last 4 mostly developed after the 50s and have smaller pockets of old stuff.

The western part has no obvious "inner" designation. All the towns on the peninsula are essentially same in terms of age, development ans land use. Downtowns with train stations and former SF elite vacation homes from the early 19th century with 50-80s era development in the rest.
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Old 10-12-2014, 12:41 PM
 
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I'd say that the towns of Onondaga, Geddes(inc Solvay), Salina and DeWitt would be where the first ring suburban communities are. There aren't any suburbs to the south except for Nedrow due to the Onondaga Nation Reservation. There are second and even third ring suburbs in all other directions though.
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Old 10-13-2014, 07:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thwanko View Post
I would say as a rule of thumb that places in SEPTA regional rail fare zone 2 that are not within the city limits are inner ring suburbs of Philadelphia, at least on the PA side.
By that definition, the airport isn't even in the inner ring of suburbs. Who cares if it's only seven miles (12 km) from Center City.
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Old 10-14-2014, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
By that definition, the airport isn't even in the inner ring of suburbs. Who cares if it's only seven miles (12 km) from Center City.
Yeah the airport line is priced really weirdly, but it's only a rule of thumb. On most lines zone 4 is somewhere like Yardley or Paoli, which I definitely wouldn't consider inner-ring. Zone 2 is places like Ardmore, Cheltenham, or Darby, which I think of as inner suburbs, or further out city neighborhoods like Mount Airy or Fox Chase. Zone 3 is sort or arguable I suppose, since it does include some city neighborhoods in the far northeast, but the suburban neighborhoods it includes I tend to think of as maybe mid-ring.
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Old 10-15-2014, 07:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thwanko View Post
Yeah the airport line is priced really weirdly, but it's only a rule of thumb. On most lines zone 4 is somewhere like Yardley or Paoli, which I definitely wouldn't consider inner-ring. Zone 2 is places like Ardmore, Cheltenham, or Darby, which I think of as inner suburbs, or further out city neighborhoods like Mount Airy or Fox Chase. Zone 3 is sort or arguable I suppose, since it does include some city neighborhoods in the far northeast, but the suburban neighborhoods it includes I tend to think of as maybe mid-ring.
I understand it's probably to hose visitors who can't vote in local elections. Interesting, though.
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Old 10-18-2014, 08:29 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hmm. I wouldn't have considered Boston's development that decentralized. Density decreases and housing style change rather consistently going outward with the center. Past a certain point, you might run into older small cities (Waltham, Salem, etc. further more "real cities" such as Lowell). Except they're not really as intensively development as the central neighborhoods of Boston and when developed weren't really part of Boston's urban area —*later suburbanization engulfed them.

For Boston I'd say the inner ring is everything inside I-95 / SR-128 as well as the towns right next to the highway. Outer ring everything outside, excluding old cities.
I'd agree, 95/128 has a lot of post WWII inner ring type development (Peabody/Wakefield/Burlington etc) and housing, and 495 suburbs started developing in the 1980/90's as suburban/exurban bedroom communities with colonial replica cul de sac neighborhoods (Andover/Westford/Westboro).
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Old 10-18-2014, 02:02 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Pittsburgh does not have a true coherent ring.

Pittsburgh, along with Boston, is one of the cities which experienced relatively decentralized development. The large number of hills in the area focused early development along the rivers, in 19th century mill towns, some of which ended up within the city, and others of which ended up remaining independent. Then there were of course the streetcar suburbs, most of which are inside the city, but some of which were also independent boroughs. Finally there were the early suburban areas, which are mostly found outside of the city, but in some cases are inside city limits.

<snip>

I could have easily linked to twice as many boroughs and townships - there are just that many in Allegheny County. You can see though they vary in terms of construction from 1890s to 1960s. There's really no general theme.
Pittsburgh has its suburbs, and it has its mill towns in the river valleys. The mill towns were more stand-alone, but really all within about 30 miles were part of the metro area as well. As I said just today on another thread, back in the 1930s my dad traveled 30 miles from his home in Beaver Falls to Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie-Mellon) to go to college a couple of nights a week, as did a neighbor of ours. However, the city does have some places that fit the sort of standard "suburb" definition of the 1950s-70s, such as it is.
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