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Old 02-18-2015, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Pittsburgh does not have a true coherent ring.

Pittsburgh, along with Boston, is one of the cities which experienced relatively decentralized development. The large number of hills in the area focused early development along the rivers, in 19th century mill towns, some of which ended up within the city, and others of which ended up remaining independent. Then there were of course the streetcar suburbs, most of which are inside the city, but some of which were also independent boroughs. Finally there were the early suburban areas, which are mostly found outside of the city, but in some cases are inside city limits.


A lot of Pittsburgh suburbs are really suburbs of the mill towns and other employment centers in the region.

White Oak and Elizabeth Township were initially built up more as a place for McKeesport's considerable work force back in the day, East Deer and West Deer township for the industrial center of New Kensington, rather than to serve the Pittsburgh workers.
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Old 02-19-2015, 02:21 AM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
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No ring here but defined by the freeways even as they came in decades later. South of 8, west of 15 is considered downtown and the core; (west, and southwest of that is the ocean) but this is a very tight loop, maybe 5 miles from one side to the other.
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Except in cities where suburban growth is new, the inner ring is the industrial blue collar suburbs and the outer rings are more professional, with most industry zoned out. This pattern seems to fit Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago and Los Angeles.
I think this is wrong, at least for Boston and Philly.

In the Boston area, some of the suburbs directly to the north and south of Boston are poor to lower-middle class (e.g., Chelsea, or Milton). But there's also mill towns further removed from the core with pockets of poverty remaining. Similarly, while most of the wealthy suburbs are found further out in MetroWest, Brookline and Newton are very close in and very wealthy.

Philadelphia is similar. The older mill towns outside of the city proper were mostly confined to Delaware County, along with a few along the Schuykill. But the center of wealth for the metro - the railroad suburbs which grew up along the "Main Line" is right outside of city limits as well.
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:55 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I think this is wrong, at least for Boston and Philly.

In the Boston area, some of the suburbs directly to the north and south of Boston are poor to lower-middle class (e.g., Chelsea, or Milton). But there's also mill towns further removed from the core with pockets of poverty remaining. Similarly, while most of the wealthy suburbs are found further out in MetroWest, Brookline and Newton are very close in and very wealthy.
I think that's a typo, Milton is rather affluent. Anyway, while i agree pvande's description doesn't work for Boston, most of the working-class are in the inner-ring except for a few scattered mill towns further out. And Lowell, Lawrence are far enough out there are not quite Boston suburbs. Milton is the red spots just south of Boston. The wealthiest towns are somewhat closer in, the outer red ones are very low density, so the map is a bit misleading regarding population. Some wealthy spots are almost adjacent to the city for obvious reasons.



map via wikipedia
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Old 02-19-2015, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
I think that's a typo, Milton is rather affluent.
I was originally going to use Quincy or Braintree. I knew Milton had a plurality black neighborhood, which is why I presumed it was not particularly wealthy.
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Old 02-19-2015, 08:04 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I was originally going to use Quincy or Braintree. I knew Milton had a plurality black neighborhood, which is why I presumed it was not particularly wealthy.
Eh. Still, Quincy or Braintree are both middle-class, maybe lower-middle class for Boston standards but not close to Everett or Chelsea. I guess historically they were still more blue-color in culture, but that's going away.

There's two tracts in Milton that come close (35% ish). Both are middle-class, one a bit affluent. Randolph to the south has plurality black neighborhoods they're about the same as Braintree or Quincy. It does seems on average the inner-ring suburbs are somewhat less affluent than further out, at least if you exclude Brookline and Newton.
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Old 02-21-2015, 09:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Philadelphia is similar. The older mill towns outside of the city proper were mostly confined to Delaware County, along with a few along the Schuykill. But the center of wealth for the metro - the railroad suburbs which grew up along the "Main Line" is right outside of city limits as well.
Right. Near the Schuylkill you have Wynnewood and Havertown and Bala Cynwyd right outside the city, and they're all wealthy. Then Gladwyne and Haverford and the rest of the main line, also wealthy. A little to the north, Lafeyette Hill and Plymouth Meeting (wealthy). First mill town you come to on the west is Conshohocken (though it's wealthy now too), which is further out.
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