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Old 04-15-2015, 10:34 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059

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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
Anyone else notice that we, at some point, switched from talking about the title of the thread, millennials, to retirees?
Well, the title of the thread is "What happens when urban youth (ie: millenials [sic]) aren't so young anymore?"

Eventually, they'll retire. Looking at what past retirees have done may give some clue.
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Old 04-15-2015, 10:44 AM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,005,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Well, the title of the thread is "What happens when urban youth (ie: millenials [sic]) aren't so young anymore?"

Eventually, they'll retire. Looking at what past retirees have done may give some clue.
Maybe, but what each generation does depends a lot upon the context in which they grew up, something that changes from generation to generation. So, looking at 70-somethings whose youth was in the 1950s and 1960s means a employment, education, financial, cultural, and historical contexts that are in stark contrast to different slices of the millennial generation (ie, those who came of working age pre-recession,recession, and post-recession). I doubt we can take the comparison very far unless we're very careful about who we're comparing to whom.
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Old 04-15-2015, 11:57 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
Maybe, but what each generation does depends a lot upon the context in which they grew up, something that changes from generation to generation. So, looking at 70-somethings whose youth was in the 1950s and 1960s means a employment, education, financial, cultural, and historical contexts that are in stark contrast to different slices of the millennial generation (ie, those who came of working age pre-recession,recession, and post-recession). I doubt we can take the comparison very far unless we're very careful about who we're comparing to whom.
I have worked a lot with the elderly in my illustrious () nursing career. The main difference between now and 1970 when I graduated is the proliferation of assisted living facilities and senior apartments, also there are more services available now such as transportation, home health care, etc. Not much difference in lifestyles between the elderly of 1970 and of 2015. Also, there are probably more differences among the elderly of a certain generation than between the elderly of different generations.
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Old 06-07-2015, 11:57 AM
 
12,299 posts, read 15,196,725 times
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I predict they will move to the suburbs for the schools, though many will move back to the city after kids are grown. I know, I've seen it with boomers. Of course the children will complain about how boring it is. Incidentally, quality of school districts is determined more by the caliber of student than how much money is spent. This is one reason why commuter rail is so important. If cities want to retain businesses, they should be easy to reach.
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Old 06-08-2015, 01:05 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,837 posts, read 21,142,259 times
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There are valid points about needing more space and wanting good schools but this isn't 1970 when all suburbs were crime free paradises. Today there are urban schools that surpass suburban ones. More places allow school choice so where you live doesn't determine school choice. And there are risks in the burbs that people don't think about. How many kids drown in private pools? How many teenagers die in car wrecks? How many are injured or killed by lawn mowers?

I would not raise a child in a condo but I think a lot of Victorian style neighborhoods are quite family friendly.
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Old 06-08-2015, 03:04 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
There are valid points about needing more space and wanting good schools but this isn't 1970 when all suburbs were crime free paradises. Today there are urban schools that surpass suburban ones. More places allow school choice so where you live doesn't determine school choice. And there are risks in the burbs that people don't think about. How many kids drown in private pools? How many teenagers die in car wrecks? How many are injured or killed by lawn mowers?

I would not raise a child in a condo but I think a lot of Victorian style neighborhoods are quite family friendly.
The suburbs weren't all crime-free paradises in 1970, either. But even today, crime rates are generally higher in the city than the burbs, by a fairly large margin. There's a thread about this somewhere here on CD; I've been on the computer all morning researching a vaccine article so I don't feel like looking this up right now.

Some school districts have some choices. These high-performing urban schools are usually charter and/or magnet schools that enroll by lottery, test scores, etc. Drowning is a common cause of accidental death in children, as are motor-vehicle accidents. Lawn mowers, not so much. Yeah, I know, I sound like a know-it-all! I am, but I've also spent a career in public health. It's my job to know this stuff. Urban kids get injured/killed in auto-pedestrian accidents.
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Old 06-12-2015, 11:33 AM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,296,241 times
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Perhaps Millenials will retro fit the inner ring suburbs, making them more walkable.

I wouldn't assume that there will be an exodus to the cul de sacs.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 06-12-2015 at 11:49 AM..
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Old 06-12-2015, 03:05 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 12 days ago)
 
48,128 posts, read 45,484,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
The article says there are 107K children in Seattle and 150K dogs.
Considering that Seattle has over 650,000 people, that means children make up less than 1/6 of the human population.

It would also be important to consider who in Seattle owns dogs.
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Old 06-12-2015, 03:10 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 12 days ago)
 
48,128 posts, read 45,484,200 times
Reputation: 15334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
Perhaps Millenials will retro fit the inner ring suburbs, making them more walkable.

I wouldn't assume that there will be an exodus to the cul de sacs.
Some of that might be taking place. New Suburbanism: Reinventing Inner-Ring Suburbs - Urban Land Magazine
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Old 06-14-2015, 11:45 AM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,296,241 times
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Looks like they are creating a sort of mini-downtown, green_mariner. I can imagine an alternative scenario with incremental infill, as scattered lots become available.

Perhaps in the long run there will be two different suburban populations, one in walkable suburbs, and another out in the cul de sacs.
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