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Old 06-14-2015, 04:48 PM
 
48,487 posts, read 45,684,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
Looks like they are creating a sort of mini-downtown, green_mariner. I can imagine an alternative scenario with incremental infill, as scattered lots become available.

Perhaps in the long run there will be two different suburban populations, one in walkable suburbs, and another out in the cul de sacs.
Some inner ring suburbs in Atlanta are getting refurbished.

I predict a third kind of suburbanite. I predict the poorer suburbanite living in the unincorporated areas/outskirt areas.
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Old 06-15-2015, 08:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I guess you could just look at us GenXers and see what we have done, I am guessing it will be fairly similar with the millenials.
Which is just that--go to the suburbs for family life.

Or in some cases, take over the suburban home from their now elderly Silent Generation parents, who are sadly starting to pass away.
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Old 06-18-2015, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,625,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
Which is just that--go to the suburbs for family life.

Or in some cases, take over the suburban home from their now elderly Silent Generation parents, who are sadly starting to pass away.
That is a bit of a generalization, just like it would be a generalization to assume all or most GenXers moved to the city the moment they were old enough to move out of the house.
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Old 06-20-2015, 12:04 PM
 
1,714 posts, read 3,149,797 times
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I grew up in the Downtown Los Angeles area... I am a city guy at heart. But after I got married, I realized I needed more space for both myself and my wife--space for hobby stuff, work stuff, computer stuff, and various my stuff and her stuff accumulated little by little.

We started renting farther and farther away from the LA core for more space and just general tranquility (from tiny apartment units to small SFRs).

Once our kid was born, we bought a 1300ft SFR in a quaint railroad suburb about 20 miles from the core... for all the reasons you would expect: safety, school, and space.

The reasonable walkability to nearby shops, restaurants, and transit options is a good bonus... a tiny bit of urbanity but with all the benefits of a suburb.
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Old 06-21-2015, 02:04 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,625,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genjy View Post
I grew up in the Downtown Los Angeles area... I am a city guy at heart. But after I got married, I realized I needed more space for both myself and my wife--space for hobby stuff, work stuff, computer stuff, and various my stuff and her stuff accumulated little by little.

We started renting farther and farther away from the LA core for more space and just general tranquility (from tiny apartment units to small SFRs).

Once our kid was born, we bought a 1300ft SFR in a quaint railroad suburb about 20 miles from the core... for all the reasons you would expect: safety, school, and space.

The reasonable walkability to nearby shops, restaurants, and transit options is a good bonus... a tiny bit of urbanity but with all the benefits of a suburb.
This is typically the benefit to streetcar suburbs and old rail stop towns that have been swallowed up in metros, they typically provide that urban walkable community with more space and suburban qualities nearby.
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Old 06-21-2015, 01:21 PM
 
12,325 posts, read 15,257,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genjy View Post
I grew up in the Downtown Los Angeles area... I am a city guy at heart. But after I got married, I realized I needed more space for both myself and my wife--space for hobby stuff, work stuff, computer stuff, and various my stuff and her stuff accumulated little by little.

We started renting farther and farther away from the LA core for more space and just general tranquility (from tiny apartment units to small SFRs).

Once our kid was born, we bought a 1300ft SFR in a quaint railroad suburb about 20 miles from the core... for all the reasons you would expect: safety, school, and space.

The reasonable walkability to nearby shops, restaurants, and transit options is a good bonus... a tiny bit of urbanity but with all the benefits of a suburb.
Now that Metrolink is well established, I guess there are railroad suburbs of LA. But I suppose smaller percentage commuting to downtown LA than in regions like NY and Chicago.
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Old 06-21-2015, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,457 posts, read 60,048,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Much has been written about the migration of young people to live in the cities. But what happens when the urban young grow older and start having families? Do they start migrating back to the suburbs?
Unless the big-city school districts improve their performance remarkably in the next 10 years, then yes, I can see young people moving where they can get the best education for their children; although, there always will be families who stay in the city for whatever reason - home schooling, private schools, charter and magnet schools.

Priorities change as you grow older. I didn't believe it myself when I was 25, but damn, it is so true.
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Old 06-22-2015, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,799 posts, read 10,248,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I predict they will move to the suburbs for the schools, though many will move back to the city after kids are grown. I know, I've seen it with boomers. Of course the children will complain about how boring it is. Incidentally, quality of school districts is determined more by the caliber of student than how much money is spent. This is one reason why commuter rail is so important. If cities want to retain businesses, they should be easy to reach.
Actually, in my suburban neighborhood, many of the residents do NOT move after the kids are grown. The average age is 42. If anything, the neighborhood gets younger because younger people buy the homes from downsizing retirees, but there are still many original owners who enjoy their homes and larger yards. My neighbors, both in their sixties, really enjoy futzing around in their gardens. We're one of only three young families with children in the cul-de-sac. In fact, only 48% of the neighborhood residents have children in the home, so a majority are either retirees or people who do not have children in the home for one reason or another.

Diverting from your post, I agree with Ohiogirl, schools are a big attractant for people with families. I used to be an urban youth but I can tell you, I've always wanted to raise my children in the suburbs and live a suburban lifestyle. I did the party/hang out in the city thing in my early to mid twenties. Once I married and had a family, my priorities and desires definitely changed. I don't want my children going to failing schools. We don't make enough money to live in the urban areas that zone to decent schools, and even if we could afford to drop money on a 900k house, why would we when we could get a top notch education at a fraction of the price, plus more space, plus bigger yard?

That is why the suburb isn't going to die despite the "non-walkability". There's enough amenities, hospitals, etc. within a ten minute drive to keep us in our neighborhood past retirement. Probably the only reason why we'd leave is due to me no longer being able to handle stairs.
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Overland Park, KS
187 posts, read 192,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Actually, in my suburban neighborhood, many of the residents do NOT move after the kids are grown. The average age is 42. If anything, the neighborhood gets younger because younger people buy the homes from downsizing retirees, but there are still many original owners who enjoy their homes and larger yards. My neighbors, both in their sixties, really enjoy futzing around in their gardens. We're one of only three young families with children in the cul-de-sac. In fact, only 48% of the neighborhood residents have children in the home, so a majority are either retirees or people who do not have children in the home for one reason or another.

Diverting from your post, I agree with Ohiogirl, schools are a big attractant for people with families. I used to be an urban youth but I can tell you, I've always wanted to raise my children in the suburbs and live a suburban lifestyle. I did the party/hang out in the city thing in my early to mid twenties. Once I married and had a family, my priorities and desires definitely changed. I don't want my children going to failing schools. We don't make enough money to live in the urban areas that zone to decent schools, and even if we could afford to drop money on a 900k house, why would we when we could get a top notch education at a fraction of the price, plus more space, plus bigger yard?

That is why the suburb isn't going to die despite the "non-walkability". There's enough amenities, hospitals, etc. within a ten minute drive to keep us in our neighborhood past retirement. Probably the only reason why we'd leave is due to me no longer being able to handle stairs.
Our neighborhood is a similar demographic, but I believe our average age is closer to 50-55. Many built their houses in the 80s and 90s, raised their kids, and have now stayed through retirement. The nice/unique houses, great yards, big trees, gardens, calm and quiet.. why would you move away from that, especially in retirement? When we bought the house a few years ago we were the youngest couple in the neighborhood, and now we have several more neighbors moving in from downtown and urban/apartment living so they can raise their kids in a nice house with a large yard and access to top schools - all for far cheaper than accommodations in the city.

I have to admit that my viewpoint is biased, as I was raised in the suburbs as well. I had my time of urban living during college but even then I knew it was not a sustainable lifestyle for myself. Sure it was fun to walk to restaurants and bars, but that was the only advantage. With my hobbies I need a house with space, a garage, a yard, etc. We bought this house with the plan of living in it for 30+ years, and I do not foresee us moving to a downtown-style urban environment upon retirement.
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Old 07-08-2015, 12:38 AM
 
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I think a lot of them might move to inner suburbs as a lot of them have been gentrifying. They get the benefits of being close to the city, while also having benefits of suburbs like more space. And I think new urbanism will also have a big impact. Areas surrounding commuter rail stations will be upzoned and developed, so that families can have a quiet suburban lifestyle that is also very walkable. So perhaps the post war sprawling suburbs won't be popular anymore.
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