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Old 10-08-2014, 09:21 AM
 
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I'm 31, my husband is 32. We are officially Millenials (although culturally, we are not.) I grew up working class rural, he grew up working class urban (Northeast Philly. Irish, Italian, Polish neighborhoods.)

Anyway, what is driving us out of the city is without a doubt the school situation. I am running as if being flogged, and yes I mean to be dramatic. I absolutely, positively cannot put my tiny, innocent, bright, love to learn Kindergartener in a Philadelphia public school. The kids in our elementary catchment are already cussing and talking about body parts at age 5, come from homes where books are nonexistant, and she will not spend 8 hours a day with them, period.

So yes, you try for a charter spot. If you can't get a charter spot, you figure out whether to pay the local Catholic of Baptist parochial school $500 a month (literally) to school your kiddo. That $500 a month on top of our Philly mortgage would pay for a house in a South Jersey town with much better schools, so that is where we'll end up within a year or two.

Philly is in worse shape than most when it comes to public schools. We have this whole alternate system of Catholic school, which is the only real alternative for B students (magnet schools are fiercely competitive and charters have few slots.)
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Old 10-08-2014, 10:29 AM
 
245 posts, read 243,925 times
Reputation: 174
get the right job and you can do really well, living in a small town. Nurse anethecists make millions of $ in career that only requires a master's degree. :-)
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Old 10-08-2014, 10:31 AM
 
245 posts, read 243,925 times
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if more people understood that each kid costs 1/2 million $ to raise (properly) there'd be many less kids. So you can retire in 10 years, or you can have a couple of kids and still be working 30 years from now. Take your pick.
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Old 10-08-2014, 10:54 AM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,274,492 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't think you understand how public school funding works. All schools in a district get the same per-pupil allotment, plus then schools with high number of students in poverty, high numbers of English language learners, and the like get extra funds on top of that. In addition, cities generally have decent tax bases and often have higher per-pupil allotments than suburban schools.

I find that hard to believe, as the best ranked public schools are almost always located in the wealthier school districts, with the exception of some magnet schools. And it's not the case in California according to the LA Times, which says that districts in CA with poorer students are not treated equally at all in regard to funding, but that Governor Brown is currently working to correct the problem.


Fairly funding California's schools - Los Angeles Times
By The Times editorial board
May 28, 2013
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Old 10-08-2014, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,312 posts, read 26,335,336 times
Reputation: 11780
Quote:
Originally Posted by rohirette View Post
I'm 31, my husband is 32. We are officially Millenials (although culturally, we are not.) I grew up working class rural, he grew up working class urban (Northeast Philly. Irish, Italian, Polish neighborhoods.)

Anyway, what is driving us out of the city is without a doubt the school situation. I am running as if being flogged, and yes I mean to be dramatic. I absolutely, positively cannot put my tiny, innocent, bright, love to learn Kindergartener in a Philadelphia public school. The kids in our elementary catchment are already cussing and talking about body parts at age 5, come from homes where books are nonexistant, and she will not spend 8 hours a day with them, period.

So yes, you try for a charter spot. If you can't get a charter spot, you figure out whether to pay the local Catholic of Baptist parochial school $500 a month (literally) to school your kiddo. That $500 a month on top of our Philly mortgage would pay for a house in a South Jersey town with much better schools, so that is where we'll end up within a year or two.

Philly is in worse shape than most when it comes to public schools. We have this whole alternate system of Catholic school, which is the only real alternative for B students (magnet schools are fiercely competitive and charters have few slots.)
$500 per month is pretty damned good. 9 months of school works out to $4,500 per year. I'm sure there are other fees but it's workable nonetheless. My cousin sent her kid to a Catholic school in Center City and they are very much a working-class family.

In DC, the Catholic schools are only a little cheaper than private schools. St. John's, which is probably the most notable one, is $17,200 per year. Gonzaga is $20,125. Holy Cross is $20,725 per year. If you have two kids, you're talking about dropping $40,000 per year.
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Old 10-08-2014, 08:25 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,120,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post

And I'm not sure what part of Chicago's south side you live(d) in but the walkscore is not that high. Mostly around 55-70 compared to 85 to 95 (or even more?) for denser (but still not super dense downtown/highrise dominated) urban neighbourhoods... and Toronto's biggest suburbs, Mississauga and Brampton are at 50-55, with the Vancouver suburbs ranking about the same if not a bit higher (Burnaby is at 65). So South Chicago doesn't seem like the best example of urban walkability.
Chicago's south side might have a worse retail density for its population density compared to other urban black neighborhoods. Not sure why. To begin with, the South Side is less than the North Side pushing to the realm not enough will be in walking distance.

Why Is So Much of Chicago a Commercial Desert? | Chicago magazine | The 312 May 2013

Chicago

Translated: that means Chicago’s poorest neighborhoods are tremendously business-poor, even compared to other cities’ poorest neighborhoods. As the author, Marco Luis Small, puts it: “In some cases, the difference is stark. Chicago has 82% fewer small restaurants, 95% fewer small banks, and 72% fewer small convenience stores than a black poor ghetto in the average city…. The average black poor neighborhood in the U.S. does not look at all like the South Side of Chicago.”

No, not saying chirack lives in a poor neighborhood, but making some comments on Chicago
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Old 10-08-2014, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,079 posts, read 102,815,223 times
Reputation: 33147
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I find that hard to believe, as the best ranked public schools are almost always located in the wealthier school districts, with the exception of some magnet schools. And it's not the case in California according to the LA Times, which says that districts in CA with poorer students are not treated equally at all in regard to funding, but that Governor Brown is currently working to correct the problem.


Fairly funding California's schools - Los Angeles Times
By The Times editorial board
May 28, 2013
You many not believe it, but it's true, in general.

Find your district’s 2012-13 funding numbers | Chalkbeat
Douglas County is one of the wealthiest counties in the US. Cherry Creek is also a wealthy area. Aurora and Denver, by contrast have a lot of poor students. The LA Times article did not support your post.
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Old 10-08-2014, 08:40 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,120,818 times
Reputation: 14811
Those per pupil numbers look so low. An entire county is a school district? Nassau County (Long Island) is the same wealth-wise as Douglas but spends 3-4 times more per pupil.
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Old 10-08-2014, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,079 posts, read 102,815,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Those per pupil numbers look so low
Colorado has fairly low per-pupil expenditures, but good results.
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Old 10-09-2014, 07:25 AM
 
Location: USA
6,229 posts, read 5,382,906 times
Reputation: 10643
I never plan on leaving the city. I spent my entire childhood, and up to mid 20s living in a rural area and hated it dearly. I wouldn't want to be old and stuck in some house in the middle of nowhere. There is always something interesting to do or someone interesting to talk to in the city.
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