U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-05-2014, 07:15 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,259,093 times
Reputation: 2924

Advertisements

Much has been written about the migration of young people to live in the cities. But what happens
when the urban young grow older and start having families? Do they start migrating back to the suburbs?

I would think so. As young people get older I think they tend to move away from the urban core to the suburbs, or to more suburb-like neighborhoods within the city. Having a high-density of people also means high-density of vehicle traffic congestion, and the noise and stress that comes with it. I got tired of living in downtown San Francisco and moved for that reason. It's not a very family-friendly environment. The urban core of SF is not a very large area, but the vehicle congestion is very bad. Despite popular perception, most of SF is actually more suburban than urban in nature. The downtown area is rather small compared to the rest of the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-05-2014, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,054 posts, read 29,454,811 times
Reputation: 7830
I guess you could just look at us GenXers and see what we have done, I am guessing it will be fairly similar with the millenials.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2014, 08:15 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,259,093 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I guess you could just look at us GenXers and see what we have done, I am guessing it will be fairly similar with the millenials.
Despite all the efforts to revitalize cities in recent years, it may not go far enough. They still tend to be very car-oriented. So yes, as millenials age and start families they are likely to follow boomers and Xers in a reverse migration to the suburbs and cul-de-sacs. Suburbs are very car-oriented as well, but things are more spread apart so the congestion isn't as bad as in the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2014, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,054 posts, read 29,454,811 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Despite all the efforts to revitalize cities in recent years, it may not go far enough. They still tend to be very car-oriented. So yes, as millenials age and start families they are likely to follow boomers and Xers in a reverse migration to the suburbs and cul-de-sacs. Suburbs are very car-oriented as well, but things are more spread apart so the congestion isn't as bad as in the city.
There are a number of cities that have seen amazing revitalization work, so I am not sure I follow what you are saying. Also, this doesn't mean there can't be walkable communities in the suburbs as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2014, 09:01 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,259,093 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
There are a number of cities that have seen amazing revitalization work, so I am not sure I follow what you are saying.
Which is great for attracting loads of (mainly young) single people. But not enough to keep them there as they get older and start having families. But that's why cities have ample supplies of residential duplexes and (small lot) single family housing, to better compete with the suburbs.


Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Also, this doesn't mean there can't be walkable communities in the suburbs as well.
In theory.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2014, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,054 posts, read 29,454,811 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Which is great for attracting loads of (mainly young) single people. But not enough to keep them there as they get older and start having families. But that's why cities have ample supplies of residential duplexes and (small lot) single family housing, to better compete with the suburbs.




In theory.
I am not sure I agree with you here. Just in Portland I know a number of people who use to be young and single here who now have a kid and setting roots down in the city.

Not all stay in cities when it is time to start a family, but I think there are more than you think that are staying to raise families as they put down roots in the cities they have come to love.

Of course there are still lots of American cities still struggling to get this attention from young Americans in hopes to get them to put down roots.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2014, 09:21 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,608 posts, read 54,185,975 times
Reputation: 30846
A few years ago it made the news that Seattle had more dogs than children. The main problem with big cities is the quality of the schools. Those young parents who want the best for their kids end up moving when the oldest is 3-4 years old, looking for the best performing suburban schools. When the kids are younger they are fine with living in the quieter avenues of the city where shops and restaurants are withing a walkable distance but with much less crime than downtown areas.

Seattle Magazine | Arts & Culture/News & Features | Seattle's Dog Obsession






Seattle Magazine | Arts & Culture/News & Features | Seattle's Dog Obsession
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2014, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,054 posts, read 29,454,811 times
Reputation: 7830
Also you have to consider that those that live in cities want to have less children. My wife and I are planning on staying in Portland and only having one child. A number of our friends that have children in Portland also are only having one child.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2014, 09:54 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,849,843 times
Reputation: 1439
When people have families the car becomes much more useful and the things that appeal to youth don’t appeal to people with families. What makes city living so exciting is all the events, bars, clubs and restaurants that you can go to. With a family these are much less of a draw. Can’t take kids into bars and clubs and the kind of restaurant you take a date to impress or to dine for yourself is different than the kind you would take a kid to esp. young children.

Public transit which can be very time inefficient for trips other than to the CBD during rush hour creates problems when you have more to carry, more place to go and less time to do so. If you need to pick one kid up before 6(else they charge you) and get another kid somewhere by 7:00, the CTA is not your friend. Walkability is great, but what do you do when your kids are too young to walk alone(and you need to be somewhere else by 9:00) or too young to use public transit by themselves(under say 11 or 12 for an simple route)? Places that lack parking pose problems when you actually do need the car for more than a trip to the office.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2014, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,054 posts, read 29,454,811 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
A few years ago it made the news that Seattle had more dogs than children. The main problem with big cities is the quality of the schools. Those young parents who want the best for their kids end up moving when the oldest is 3-4 years old, looking for the best performing suburban schools. When the kids are younger they are fine with living in the quieter avenues of the city where shops and restaurants are withing a walkable distance but with much less crime than downtown areas.

Seattle Magazine | Arts & Culture/News & Features | Seattle's Dog Obsession






Seattle Magazine | Arts & Culture/News & Features | Seattle's Dog Obsession
The article says there are 107K children in Seattle and 150K dogs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:49 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top