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Old 10-08-2014, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Read it here.

Basically they looked at the migration of college-educated people from 2000 to 2012 into cities as a proxy for gentrification. They chose to look at three groups of cities: magnet cities, sunbelt cities, and legacy cities. Magnet basically equals cities everyone agrees are gentrifying, and legacy means rustbelt. They broke down college-educated adults in to four groups 25-34 (top demographic for gentrification), 35-44 (which they identify as a proxy for parents in childrearing years), 45-64, and 65+.

For each city, they took a look at three metrics. First, a ratio of the number of college-educated people in that bracket compared to the state at large for 2012. Then, the same ratio for 2000. Finally, what percentage of the numeric growth in the total state population of college-educated folks was captured within the state by said city.

In terms of 25-34 year olds (millennials) all of the "magnet cities" showed significant growth. In the sunbelt only Atlanta and to a lesser extent Miami showed appeal, with Dallas, Phoenix, and Las Vegas showing little appeal. In the rust belt Baltimore, Philly, Pittsburgh, and Saint Louis attract millennials, but the rest do not.

Younger gen-Xers show attraction to a more limited set of cities. To a certain extent they like most of the "magnet cities" - but less than millennials. They are not moving to the Sun Belt except for Atlanta and Miami (growth in Gen-Xers is stronger than millennials in Miami). No rust-belt city other than Saint Louis was found to have gained significant numbers in this demographic.

In terms of the over 45 college-educated demographics, they both behave the same - they just don't seem to like cities, and don't seem to be returning to them. They don't particularly like any cities in the rust belt or the sun belt. They seem to be moving to Seattle, San Francisco, and Austin to a certain degree, but that's about it. There's no evidence that "empty nesters" are going into cities.

Last edited by eschaton; 10-08-2014 at 01:27 PM..
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Old 10-08-2014, 12:41 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Sounds interesting, but your link is a streetview in Pittsburgh. Nice streetscape, though.
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Old 10-08-2014, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Sounds interesting, but your link is a streetview in Pittsburgh. Nice streetscape, though.
Goddamnit. I hate it when the cache doesn't clear when I copy and paste. It's fixed now.

That's a house in Troy Hill one of the richest men in Pittsburgh lived in at one point, FWIW.
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Old 10-08-2014, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,653,336 times
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I'm still seeing the street view.
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Old 10-08-2014, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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It is a good looking old house.
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Old 10-08-2014, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Damnit...I dunno why control+V sometimes doesn't work. Fixed now for realz.
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Old 10-08-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
It is a good looking old house.
But it has no garage! You really need that in the snowy weather.
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Old 10-08-2014, 02:21 PM
 
56,538 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Read it here.

Basically they looked at the migration of college-educated people from 2000 to 2012 into cities as a proxy for gentrification. They chose to look at three groups of cities: magnet cities, sunbelt cities, and legacy cities. Magnet basically equals cities everyone agrees are gentrifying, and legacy means rustbelt. They broke down college-educated adults in to four groups 25-34 (top demographic for gentrification), 35-44 (which they identify as a proxy for parents in childrearing years), 45-64, and 65+.

For each city, they took a look at three metrics. First, a ratio of the number of college-educated people in that bracket compared to the state at large for 2012. Then, the same ratio for 2000. Finally, what percentage of the numeric growth in the total state population of college-educated folks was captured within the state by said city.

In terms of 25-34 year olds (millennials) all of the "magnet cities" showed significant growth. In the sunbelt only Atlanta and to a lesser extent Miami showed appeal, with Dallas, Phoenix, and Las Vegas showing little appeal. In the rust belt Baltimore, Philly, Pittsburgh, and Saint Louis attract millennials, but the rest do not.

Younger gen-Xers show attraction to a more limited set of cities. To a certain extent they like most of the "magnet cities" - but less than millennials. They are not moving to the Sun Belt except for Atlanta and Miami (growth in Gen-Xers is stronger than millennials in Miami). No rust-belt city other than Saint Louis was found to have gained significant numbers in this demographic.

In terms of the over 45 college-educated demographics, they both behave the same - they just don't seem to like cities, and don't seem to be returning to them. They don't particularly like any cities in the rust belt or the sun belt. They seem to be moving to Seattle, San Francisco, and Austin to a certain degree, but that's about it. There's no evidence that "empty nesters" are going into cities.
I find this sentence to be very interesting, given what I've heard and seen locally and in a couple of other cities. I wonder if it is a matter of research not being done/incomplete or if the trend is overstated.
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Old 10-08-2014, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I find this sentence to be very interesting, given what I've heard and seen locally and in a couple of other cities. I wonder if it is a matter of research not being done/incomplete or if the trend is overstated.
My guess is in some cases the total number of empty nesters is stagnant or declining, but the locations of them in cities is changing a bit. E.g., less in outer, semi-suburban residential areas, and more in central city neighborhoods.
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Old 10-08-2014, 02:33 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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I wonder why they chose Brooklyn but not Manhattan? Both Brooklyn and Chicago were near the bottom of the list for an increase in college educated "Millenialials" as they're both large with lots of non-gentrifying areas.
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