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Old 10-14-2014, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
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And I'm not using the word 'staggering' lightly either.

Consider than in its 50 year history it has logged 7 billion passenger trips that have averaged between 198 miles in 1968 to 145 miles in 2007. That is over a trillion passenger miles in its history while recording a single fatality.

Then consider in the US the fatality rate on our highways was 1.14 per 100 million miles in 2012. Even if you say 2 or 3 people per vehicle when you extrapolate that to 1 trillion passenger miles the result is .
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Old 10-18-2014, 07:17 AM
 
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Total lack of grade crossings is a major factor, as violating railroad crossings is the cause of most rail fatalities. Second is trespassing, I assume Japanese know better.
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Old 10-18-2014, 02:46 PM
 
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The worst high speed train disasters were due to derailment (Spain and Germany) or collision with another train (China).
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Old 10-19-2014, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
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It's worth noting that basic track maintainence for both freight and passenger railroads have made huge advances since a larger, but less-heavily-sed rail network fell apart back in the Fifites and Sixtioes. Freight cars have increased in size and lenghth, and nearly doubled in capacity since that time, and both yearly freezing and thawing and the old-fasioned "jointed" cail could create forces which destabilized the track.

Continuous welded, rather than jinted rail, is just about standared on all mainlines today, and the use of rail anchoers, screw-type spikes, and reinfocement of major curves have reduced the probability of a derailment. And at 155 lbs per yard, the rail used on Amtrak's Northeast Corridor is the heaviest and most stable in the nation.
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Old 10-19-2014, 10:04 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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How much freight is on the Shinkansen lines? I assume it's little.
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Old 10-19-2014, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
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Shinkansen carries no freight (the Japanese economy relies heavily on water and, recently, highway transport). The point is that heavier rail is more resistant to cracks and breaks due to the stresses of heavier vehicles and higher speeds; but the improvements in technology have made all forms of rail transit safer.

Research in he safey and stabolity of rails goes back a long way.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperry_Rail_Service
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Old 10-19-2014, 05:32 PM
 
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I stand corrected. Trespassing is actually the leading cause. Highway-Rail Grade Crossing and Trespass Prevention | Federal Railroad Administration
The Japanese are very law abiding. Also the tracks are isolated and it would be very difficult to trespass.
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Old 10-20-2014, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Total lack of grade crossings is a major factor, as violating railroad crossings is the cause of most rail fatalities. Second is trespassing, I assume Japanese know better.
No, there are people everywhere that don't better. Massive barriers and good security keep tresspassers off the shinkansen ROW.

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Old 10-21-2014, 07:17 PM
 
1,128 posts, read 1,519,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
No, there are people everywhere that don't better.
Actually, culture has a huge effect on these sorts of things, they have an extremely law-abiding society. If they're told not to do something, they actually don't do it.

I know a few people who've gone over there to ski, and they're always amazed that absolutely no one except the Westerners visiting ever violates the rules on what is open to ski even when there's great terrain just outside the officially open area. In contrast, in the US no one obeys the rules unless it's closed for avalanche danger (and unfortunately, not even always then).
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Old 10-23-2014, 02:01 AM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,874,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by millerm277 View Post
Actually, culture has a huge effect on these sorts of things, they have an extremely law-abiding society. If they're told not to do something, they actually don't do it.

I know a few people who've gone over there to ski, and they're always amazed that absolutely no one except the Westerners visiting ever violates the rules on what is open to ski even when there's great terrain just outside the officially open area. In contrast, in the US no one obeys the rules unless it's closed for avalanche danger (and unfortunately, not even always then).
Um, actually they do have a problem with it. I have been to Japan, and my statement was based on first hand experience. There is a reason for those high fences in the picture I posted. The barbed wire on top is not for looks. It's a big problem for them.

Trends in railway accidents
In the fiscal year ending March 2013, JR East recorded 147 railway accidents, including 34 accidents at level crossings involving people or automobiles being hit by trains, accounting for approximately 20 percent of the total accidents. Additionally, JR East recorded 108 accidents involving injury or fatality, including customers on platforms or trespassers on tracks coming into contact with trains, and customers falling onto the tracks from platforms, totaling approximately 70 percent of the total number of accidents. Approximately 80 percent of these injuries or fatalities occurred on platforms, and approximately 60 percent these involved intoxicated customers.


https://www.jreast.co.jp/e/environme...013/p45_46.pdf
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