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Old 10-14-2014, 11:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
I don't think anyone is suggesting that conditioning students is the typical reason schools often have walkable campuses or nearby neighbourhoods, but this can still happen as a secondary effect of planning choices that were made for practical reasons.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
Exactly. I'm not saying this is some big conspiracy where universities do it intentionally to cultivate a walkability culture. I'm just saying that interest in walkable spaces has arisen as a byproduct of increased college enrollment over the past few decades.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
So the main question here is- do colleges and universities condition today's college-age youth to want walkable spaces? In other words, do college campuses create that desire?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyxius View Post
No. Universities have limited space and parking so they have to make use of what they have. I do not believe it is their intention to condition students. Students are more concern about socializing and exams.
Am I missing something?
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:54 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
So the main question here is-do colleges and universities condition today's college-age youth to want walkable spaces? In other words, do college campuses create that desire?
College campuses have existed for hundreds of years. Walkability is a fad, like swallowing goldfish and joining Students for a Democratic Society.
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Old 10-15-2014, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
College campuses have existed for hundreds of years. Walkability is a fad, like swallowing goldfish and joining Students for a Democratic Society.
How exactly is walkability a fad when it has been around since the birth of the city? If anything, people are starting to understand what it means to build to the human scale and to design places that don't rely on only one form of transportation.
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Old 10-15-2014, 07:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
....Student housing is typically pretty crowded as well and often consists of dense structures, sometimes high rises. College campuses are conditioned primarily for walking, and some even enforce it by banning cars for certain year students.

So the main question here is-do colleges and universities condition today's college-age youth to want walkable spaces? In other words, do college campuses create that desire?
One might argue that colleges promote "density" through dormitory/hamster style housing. On the other hand, how many former students are actually interested in pursuing dorm as opposed to seeking anything but. From that perspective one might argue that colleges/universities expose students to such an environment to condition them to seek something else. In short, I don't think the college/university is "conditioning" students as you have proposed but merely performing some educational function within the geographic territory it is limited to. How many jobs require employees to get from one site at the employer to another multiple times per day and only require 1 to 1.5 hours attention span at a time? Do universities also condition students to want to work for free, live in cramped, crowded housing without privacy, and to pay a tax (tuition) for the privilege? You may find a correlation but I don't think you will find causation. As Ohiogirl81 suggested at best you may have identified a fad.
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Old 10-15-2014, 08:37 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
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My kids were required to live in dorms for a year or 2 (different schools had different requirements), and they could NOT wait to get out of the crowded dorm life. One is now in an apartment about a mile from campus, and another rents a house about 1/2 mile from campus. Each has their own private bedroom, as opposed to having to live in a 10x12 room with another person.
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Old 10-15-2014, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeachSalsa View Post
My kids were required to live in dorms for a year or 2 (different schools had different requirements), and they could NOT wait to get out of the crowded dorm life. One is now in an apartment about a mile from campus, and another rents a house about 1/2 mile from campus. Each has their own private bedroom, as opposed to having to live in a 10x12 room with another person.
I will say one thing about being in a dorm - whenever I had a roommate I did everything I could to be out and about for most of the day, only returning to my room to sleep. In contrast when I had a room to myself I was much less apt to be out and socializing, and more likely to stay in my room and read/be on the computer. So in a very real way even though I disliked sharing a room, it was great for my social life.
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Old 10-15-2014, 09:02 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I will say one thing about being in a dorm - whenever I had a roommate I did everything I could to be out and about for most of the day, only returning to my room to sleep. In contrast when I had a room to myself I was much less apt to be out and socializing, and more likely to stay in my room and read/be on the computer. So in a very real way even though I disliked sharing a room, it was great for my social life.
My kids are all so involved in clubs, groups, student government, and activities, besides studying at the library, they are rarely ever in their apartments. But I can see your point if a child was shy or not apt to get out and involved in life.
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Old 10-15-2014, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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My university has 27,000 undergraduate students, and I think traditional dorm style housing with two students per bedroom for only about 2000 students. There's some single student bedroom dorms and a fair bit of apartment style residences where you have your own bedroom and share a kitchen/common room and bathroom with just 2-3 other students.

I think most out of town students stay in campus housing for 1st year, although you're not required to, and then for the rest of their undergrad they rent a house or apartment with several bedrooms where they have their own bedroom but share a kitchen and maybe 1-2 other common rooms and maybe bathrooms (although some higher end students apartments have ensuite bathrooms and 1-2 bedroom apartments are getting more common).
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Old 10-15-2014, 09:48 AM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,673,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyxius View Post
Am I missing something?
It's not an intentional "conditioning." If to condition is by definition intentional then I apologize for using the wrong vocab.
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Old 10-15-2014, 10:02 AM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,673,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
One might argue that colleges promote "density" through dormitory/hamster style housing. On the other hand, how many former students are actually interested in pursuing dorm as opposed to seeking anything but. From that perspective one might argue that colleges/universities expose students to such an environment to condition them to seek something else. In short, I don't think the college/university is "conditioning" students as you have proposed but merely performing some educational function within the geographic territory it is limited to. How many jobs require employees to get from one site at the employer to another multiple times per day and only require 1 to 1.5 hours attention span at a time? Do universities also condition students to want to work for free, live in cramped, crowded housing without privacy, and to pay a tax (tuition) for the privilege? You may find a correlation but I don't think you will find causation. As Ohiogirl81 suggested at best you may have identified a fad.
First off, as I have said twice before, the universities aren't intentionally creating this trend, it is merely a byproduct of increased enrollment in colleges. The natural organization of university campuses is inadvertently creating the increased demand for walkable spaces.

Second, it might be conditioning them to dislike density, but perhaps it's also getting them used to it. But that's beside the point. My point is that college life is creating a preference for walkable environments, where the destinations are much closer together. Frankly, the conditions of college classes vs typical employment is irrelevant, but if you really want to get into that I will counter with the fact that students also like to walk to their amenities, such as bars, restaurants, and shops in the college town, as well as places like sports stadiums or rec centers on the campus itself.
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