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Old 10-29-2014, 02:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I have to disagree on this one. "In-law's cottages" are a convenient way to bring in income without sharing a living space, and the demand is present, both from property owners and potential renters, in residential-supply-impacted areas. Strictly speaking, the size of these units are no more troublesome for renters than would be a studio apartment or having roommates.

From a different perspective, they're a great way to add unit supply and population (ie, consumers) to an area without drastically impacting the built form (as opposed to 'plexes or apartments).
The issue with in-law cottages is that they may or may not be legal to rent out and people really don't like strangers(renters) living in close proximity to them. To quote an neighbor who had an two flat "It makes you want to get out your gun. Having people who are late paying rent and making noise on top of your house."

In law cottages would mostly be used for guest and family members. In the case of that neighbor she stopped renting it out and put some relatives up there.
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Old 10-29-2014, 02:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
The issue with in-law cottages is that they may or may not be legal to rent out and people really don't like strangers(renters) living in close proximity to them. To quote an neighbor who had an two flat "It makes you want to get out your gun. Having people who are late paying rent and making noise on top of your house."

In law cottages would mostly be used for guest and family members. In the case of that neighbor she stopped renting it out and put some relatives up there.
I am aware of the unfortunately fuzzy legality of in-law units. But that's a policy choice at the local level. And it's not really a smart one, as, so long as the unit is up to code, it should be up to the property owner.

And that's just it with in-law units, if the owner doesn't want another person living on their property, don't rent it out at all or don't rent it to a particular potential tenant.

But, in supply-impacted areas where land prices are high as a result, it makes sense to make that choice legal. Some people, especially younger individuals and couples, would gladly offset some of their mortgage by renting out an in-law unit. And, as I said before, it adds supply without changing the appearance--that all-important built form--of a neighborhood.
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Old 10-29-2014, 03:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post

And that's just it with in-law units, if the owner doesn't want another person living on their property, don't rent it out at all or don't rent it to a particular potential tenant.

But, in supply-impacted areas where land prices are high as a result, it makes sense to make that choice legal. Some people, especially younger individuals and couples, would gladly offset some of their mortgage by renting out an in-law unit. And, as I said before, it adds supply without changing the appearance--that all-important built form--of a neighborhood.
It is more than that. There are costs, risks and liabilities to renting. Only a person interested in being an landlord would do so and it is probably best to keep business and home separate. An person in an in-law apartment isn't just on property you own, they are on you own personal property near your house.

If you need to serve them an eviction notice they CAN take it out personally on you with ease. Any noise, parties, police coming over after being called is on the very house you are living in. There are very good and compelling reasons not to rent that kind of unit out. Even where I live two flat housing is often bought by one family and not rented out or if it is rented out the land lord does not live in the same building.
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Old 10-29-2014, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
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Default Does development create segregation?

Segregation is created and perpetuated by property values, simply enough.

Therefore, when you work hard to make a community visually attractive, safe, convenient and generally pleasant for residents you inadvertently segregate it by raising the property values and pricing out the "unwashed masses".
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Old 10-29-2014, 08:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
It is more than that. There are costs, risks and liabilities to renting. Only a person interested in being an landlord would do so and it is probably best to keep business and home separate. An person in an in-law apartment isn't just on property you own, they are on you own personal property near your house.

If you need to serve them an eviction notice they CAN take it out personally on you with ease. Any noise, parties, police coming over after being called is on the very house you are living in. There are very good and compelling reasons not to rent that kind of unit out. Even where I live two flat housing is often bought by one family and not rented out or if it is rented out the land lord does not live in the same building.
That said, it is still a choice by the property owner. Everything has risk. Risk alone shouldn't be the reason for a thing being illegal. If a property owner is willing and able to rent out an up-to-code in-law unit, that should be the owner's choice.
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Old 10-29-2014, 09:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chango View Post
Segregation is created and perpetuated by property values, simply enough.

Therefore, when you work hard to make a community visually attractive, safe, convenient and generally pleasant for residents you inadvertently segregate it by raising the property values and pricing out the "unwashed masses".
Segregation is perpetuated by property values, but property values do not create segregation. A person chooses to or not to spend more of his or her dollars--a scarce resource--on living in a nicer, safer, more convenient community, and thus self-segregates. But if the individual is willing to make that choice in the affirmative, the demand was already present, and the development was only a vehicle for that individual's will to self-segregate.
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Old 10-29-2014, 10:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
It is more than that. There are costs, risks and liabilities to renting. Only a person interested in being an landlord would do so and it is probably best to keep business and home separate. An person in an in-law apartment isn't just on property you own, they are on you own personal property near your house.

If you need to serve them an eviction notice they CAN take it out personally on you with ease. Any noise, parties, police coming over after being called is on the very house you are living in. There are very good and compelling reasons not to rent that kind of unit out. Even where I live two flat housing is often bought by one family and not rented out or if it is rented out the land lord does not live in the same building.

Sounds like rents necessarily skyrocket because people intentionally keep supply of the market.
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Old 10-29-2014, 10:20 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,062,610 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chango View Post
Segregation is created and perpetuated by property values, simply enough.

Therefore, when you work hard to make a community visually attractive, safe, convenient and generally pleasant for residents you inadvertently segregate it by raising the property values and pricing out the "unwashed masses".

Sounds like renters have a DISincentive to improve their neighborhoods.

Or as I like to say, renters are negative stakeholders in their neighborhoods.
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Old 10-29-2014, 10:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
That is because of limited demand for them. The three bedroom house is much more flexible than the one or maybe two bedroom tiny Granny flats. The only people an granny flat could appeal to are single maybe childless couples(and there are lots of other options for them such as apartments, condos, and mobile homes/trailer parks.). These options however are less attractive for people with kids(major home buyers).

An larger three bedroom house would appeal to families with more than one kid(the parent's room, boy's room, girl's room). To families with one kid(parent's room, kid's room, guest room). To childless couples(bedroom, guest room, office or den). This kinds of dictates an min. size that can accommodate at least these three cases and resulting increases in other rooms to accommodate this.

Limited demand by whom? Rental demand by singles is strong for these units. When offered, they rent quickly and often to long-term tenants.
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Old 10-29-2014, 10:45 PM
 
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Frankly I hate to say it but more and more its by scale of income. Often that has driven to two workers middle and even upper middle class income families. Once ordinances where enough in a area but now more and more are adopting stricter contracts of HOA's. Life style between one income area and another can even vary greatly. private holloween in gated communities is one sign of that. Even looking at retired ;many now free of work requirement move to smaller towns to escape the violence and get back to year past days in culture. The very rich go to very elite cost wise areas to retire; if only for a country estate same as thru out history.
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